Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment A Topic:

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment A Topic:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment A Topic: History and Definitions

2 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 2 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS DESIGN Numerical Control, Robotics and Programmable Controllers History and Definitions

3 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 3 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Overview Numerical Control and RoboticsNumerical Control and Robotics –History –Definitions

4 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 4 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics - A Brief History (1) ---- Music Boxes, Clocks, Mechanical Toys, etc. (Hard Programming)---- Music Boxes, Clocks, Mechanical Toys, etc. (Hard Programming) 1725 Falcon (France) Used “decks” of punched card/blocks to control looms1725 Falcon (France) Used “decks” of punched card/blocks to control looms 1936 Ford Motor Co. Introduction of “Building Block” Automation Concept1936 Ford Motor Co. Introduction of “Building Block” Automation Concept Feedback/Control Mechanisms Developed for Fire Control in US and Briish Navies Feedback/Control Mechanisms Developed for Fire Control in US and Briish Navies

5 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 5 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics - A Brief History (2) 1947 First Computers Developed1947 First Computers Developed 1947 Parsons Jig/Borer Coupled with Computer (Did Not Function)1947 Parsons Jig/Borer Coupled with Computer (Did Not Function) 1949 DeVol Develops Recording and Playback Capabilities1949 DeVol Develops Recording and Playback Capabilities 1951 USAF Contract with MIT for NC Development1951 USAF Contract with MIT for NC Development 1951 JWN born1951 JWN born

6 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 6 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics - A Brief History (3) 1952 First Parts Cut at MIT on Modified Cincinnati HydroTel1952 First Parts Cut at MIT on Modified Cincinnati HydroTel 1952 MIT Demonstrates NC to USAF1952 MIT Demonstrates NC to USAF 1954 USAF Solicits Proposal for NC Use to Reduce Aircraft Production1954 USAF Solicits Proposal for NC Use to Reduce Aircraft Production 1955 USAF Authorizes NC Equipment Purchases (GFE)1955 USAF Authorizes NC Equipment Purchases (GFE) 1956 MIT Develops NC Program for MIT Whirlwind Computer1956 MIT Develops NC Program for MIT Whirlwind Computer

7 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 7 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics - A Brief History (4) 1956 Automatic Programmed Tool (APT) Introduced1956 Automatic Programmed Tool (APT) Introduced 1960 First Commercial Robot Application1960 First Commercial Robot Application 1964 ADAPT (Version of APT) Introduced1964 ADAPT (Version of APT) Introduced Late 1960’s Versions of NC Languages Introduced (COMPACT II, etc.)Late 1960’s Versions of NC Languages Introduced (COMPACT II, etc.)

8 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 8 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics - A Brief History (5) 1970’s Graphical Aids Developed1970’s Graphical Aids Developed 1980’s Personal Computer Versions of NC Developed (Computer Assisted Numerical Control Programming)1980’s Personal Computer Versions of NC Developed (Computer Assisted Numerical Control Programming) 1980’s Robotic Applications Spread1980’s Robotic Applications Spread

9 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 9 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control – Definitions (1) Running a Machine Tool By Tape to Make It Produce More for Less (Bendix Industrial Controls NC Handbook)Running a Machine Tool By Tape to Make It Produce More for Less (Bendix Industrial Controls NC Handbook) A System in which Actions are Controlled by The Direct Insertion of Numerical Data at Some Point With At Least Some Portion of the Data Automatically Interpreted (Electronics Industries Association (EIA))A System in which Actions are Controlled by The Direct Insertion of Numerical Data at Some Point With At Least Some Portion of the Data Automatically Interpreted (Electronics Industries Association (EIA))

10 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 10 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control – Definitions (2) A Technique for Automatically Controlling Machine Tools, Equipment, or Processes by a Series of Coded Instructions (American Society of Tool and Manufacturing Engineers )A Technique for Automatically Controlling Machine Tools, Equipment, or Processes by a Series of Coded Instructions (American Society of Tool and Manufacturing Engineers ) A Technique that Provides Prerecorded Information in a Symbolic Form Representing the Complete Instructions for the Operation of a Machine (Computer aided Manufacturing International (CAM-I))A Technique that Provides Prerecorded Information in a Symbolic Form Representing the Complete Instructions for the Operation of a Machine (Computer aided Manufacturing International (CAM-I))

11 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 11 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control – Definitions (3) A Form of Programmable Automation In Which the Process is Controlled by Numbers, Letter, and Symbols which Form the Program of Instructions for a Particular Workplace or Job (Mikell Groover )A Form of Programmable Automation In Which the Process is Controlled by Numbers, Letter, and Symbols which Form the Program of Instructions for a Particular Workplace or Job (Mikell Groover )

12 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 12 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control -- Advantages for Design Less Expensive, More Accurate PrototypesLess Expensive, More Accurate Prototypes Better Adherence to SpecificationsBetter Adherence to Specifications Better Assessment of Production Times/CostsBetter Assessment of Production Times/Costs “Impossible” Parts Can be Made“Impossible” Parts Can be Made Integration/Reuse of Computer Models From Design In ManufacturingIntegration/Reuse of Computer Models From Design In Manufacturing

13 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 13 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control -- Advantages for Manufacturing (1) Greater FlexibilityGreater Flexibility –Shape –Part Volumes Increased AccuracyIncreased Accuracy More Operations from a Single Set-UpMore Operations from a Single Set-Up Less Manufacturing Time VariabilityLess Manufacturing Time Variability Better SchedulingBetter Scheduling Increased CapacityIncreased Capacity

14 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 14 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control -- Advantages for Manufacturing (2) Greater Machine UtilizationGreater Machine Utilization Reduced Tooling CostsReduced Tooling Costs Reduced Tool CostsReduced Tool Costs Reduced Flow TimeReduced Flow Time Reduced Workpiece HandlingReduced Workpiece Handling Greater SafetyGreater Safety Improved IntegrationImproved Integration

15 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 15 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control and Robotics Essentially the Same ThingEssentially the Same Thing –Same Basic Technologies Servo Mechanisms and Feedback for Positioning NC => Machine Tool Movement (Fixture(Table), Tool, Part) Robotics => Arm Movement (Fixture (Arm), Tool, Part) –Different Psychology –Solve Different Manufacturing Problems NC => Technological and Ergonomic Problems Robotics => Economic and Ergonomic Problems

16 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 16 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robotics -- Definition A programmable, multi-functional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or special devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks -- Robotics Institute of AmericaA programmable, multi-functional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or special devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks -- Robotics Institute of America

17 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 17 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robotics -- Advantages Cost per HourCost per Hour –3 Shifts, Same Capital Investment Able to Work in Monotonous JobsAble to Work in Monotonous Jobs Able to Work In Hazardous EnvironmentsAble to Work In Hazardous Environments ConsistentConsistent –Paths –Time –Quality

18 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 18 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Applicability Long Series of Operations Where an Error in the Sequence Would Destroy the Value of the PartLong Series of Operations Where an Error in the Sequence Would Destroy the Value of the Part Wide Variety of Parts/Sequences on the Same EquipmentWide Variety of Parts/Sequences on the Same Equipment Complex Sequences of OperationsComplex Sequences of Operations Human Operation Impractical Due to Health or Psycho-Motor RequirementsHuman Operation Impractical Due to Health or Psycho-Motor Requirements

19 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment A Topic: History and Definition END OF SEGMENT

20 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment B Topic: Types and Control

21 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 21 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control and Robotics -- Classification Numerical ControlNumerical Control –Type of Control System –Number of Axes/Degrees of Freedom –Type and Number of Tools RoboticsRobotics –Type of Control System –Degrees of Freedom/Number of Axes –Type of Joints –Configuration

22 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 22 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Basic Types Open LoopOpen Loop Closed LoopClosed Loop IncrementalIncremental AbsoluteAbsolute Point to PointPoint to Point Continuous PathContinuous Path DNCDNC –Direct Numerical Control –Distributed Numerical Control CNCCNC –Computer Numerical Control Adaptive ControlAdaptive Control

23 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 23 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Types Number of AxesNumber of Axes –Numerical Control 2, 2 ½, 3, 3 ½, 4, 4 ½, 5, 6 Axis Machines Translational and Rotational Axes –Robots [Arm, Hand] [1,1], [3,0], [3,1], [3,2], [3,3] Rotational, Linear, Translational Also – “Named” Configurations

24 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 24 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC Axes Part or Tool MovementPart or Tool Movement –½ Axis When Axis Movement Limited (Must complete move Before Other Axes Can Move (e.g., Drill – Must Move Up/Down with Table Stopped.

25 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 25 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC Axes Lathe Movement (Top View – 2 Axis)Lathe Movement (Top View – 2 Axis) Tool and Tool Post (Index Rotation) Head Workpiece Turret

26 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 26 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC Axes Machining Center Movement (Top View)Machining Center Movement (Top View) –Tool or Table Movement (2-6 Axis) –Translation and Rotation

27 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 27 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robot Axes Joint (Rotational) and Link (Linear) MovementJoint (Rotational) and Link (Linear) Movement R-R RobotR–R-L Robot

28 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 28 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robots – Named Configurations Polar –(R HORIZ, R VERT, Linear) Cylindrical –(R HORIZ, Translate VERT, Linear IN/OUT ) Cartesian –(R HORIZ, Translate VERT, Translate IN/OUT ) Jointed –(R HORIZ, R BASE, R ARM )

29 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 29 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robots – Wrist Wrist –(Roll, Pitch, and Yaw)

30 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 30 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Basic Components (1) Program Prep/InputProgram Prep/Input –GUI and Data Import –Syntax Checking –Graphic Simulation Machine Control UnitMachine Control Unit –Signals to Servos –Error Detection

31 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 31 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Basic Components (2) Servo Mechanisms –“Motion Components” –Electrical, Hydraulic, or Pneumatic Machine ToolMachine Tool –Executes Programmed Movements, Commands

32 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 32 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Basic Components (3) Feedback Unit(s)Feedback Unit(s) –“Optional” –Internal to Machine Tool Position –Monitoring of Process Temperature Forces

33 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 33 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Physical Problems InertiaInertia –Static (UnderShoot) –Dynamic (OverShoot) –Torque/Speed (Acceleration/Deceleration) Control/ResolutionControl/Resolution –Measurement/Causation of Small Movements –Deflection of Components Error Buildup (Robots)Error Buildup (Robots)

34 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 34 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Physical Components (1) MovementMovement –Lead Screws/Cylinders –Optical Comparitors/Encoders Process SensorsProcess Sensors –Accelerometers –Temperature –Contact Sensors –Torque –Vibration, etc.

35 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 35 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Physical Components (2) Process ControlProcess Control –Interlocks –Process Control Programs (Robots) Part InterfacesPart Interfaces –Hands (Robots) Pneumatic Magnetic Fingered –Fixtures (NC)

36 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 36 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Physical Components (3) Prime MoversPrime Movers –Pneumatic (Robotic, NC Tooling and Controls) –Electrical (NC and Robotic) –Hydraulic (Robotic and NC, e.g. Punch)

37 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 37 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC -- Physical Control (1) Components and ControlComponents and Control –Stepping Motors –Lead Screws (Rotational to Translational) –Encoders “Read” Rotations, Portions of Rotation Can be 200 “pulses/rotation” or more –Gear Lear Screw or Table to Encoder –Potentiometer to Count Revolutions

38 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 38 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC -- Physical Control (2) Components and Control (Resolution Example)Components and Control (Resolution Example) –Lead Screws (20 Threads/Inch) –Encoders (200 Pulses/Revolution) –Resolution = 1/20 x1/200 = 1/4000 inch – = inch

39 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 39 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC -- Physical Control (3) Components and Control (Resolution Example)Components and Control (Resolution Example) –Stepping Motor (1.8 o per step) –Geared 10:1 –Controllable Step = 1/(200x10) = 1/2000 =.0005 inch –Axes Error is Independent

40 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 40 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Robot -- Physical Control Components and Control (Resolution Example)Components and Control (Resolution Example) –Same as NC –Measures Rotation of Joint –Deflection a Problem Cantilever Loading of Arm Accumulation of Errors

41 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 41 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems NC and Robotics -- Programming “Manual NC Part Programming”“Manual NC Part Programming” –Punch or Key in N, M, G, S, X, Y, Z, T, I, J Commands –These Constitute the “Assembly Language” for NC “Computer Assisted NC Programming”“Computer Assisted NC Programming” –Native Language Commands Which are Translated into Assembly Language –GUI Plus Keyboard to Develop Assembly Language

42 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 42 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Computer Assisted NC and Robotic Programming CAD MODEL INITIALIZATION MOVEMENT TOOL CHANGES PART CHANGES SYNTAX GRAPHICAL VERIFICATION CUTTER LOCATION POSTPROCESSOR MACHINE TOOL

43 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 43 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Command Comparison

44 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 44 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Command Comparison

45 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 45 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Command Comparison

46 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 46 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Numerical Control Programming -- Beyond Postprocessors EIA Standard “32 Bit Binary CL Exchange Input Format for Numerically Controlled Machine Tool”EIA Standard “32 Bit Binary CL Exchange Input Format for Numerically Controlled Machine Tool” –Machine Independent –Allows Machine Interchangeability –Possible Because of de facto Standard for NC Assembly Language (CL files) –Not Possible or Likely in Robotics -- No Standard Assembly Language

47 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment B Topic: Types and Control END OF SEGMENT

48 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment C Topic: Programmable Logic Controllers

49 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 49 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS DESIGN Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Programmable Logic Controllers

50 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 50 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Overview DefinitionDefinition Physical Structure and ComponentsPhysical Structure and Components ProgrammingProgramming –Digital Logic –Ladder Logic UseUse –Motion Control –Process Control

51 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 51 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers -- Definition An programmable, industrially hardened microprocessor with extensive, modular I/O capabilities that are electrically isolated from the microprocessor. Volatile memory is usually safeguarded by battery backup.An programmable, industrially hardened microprocessor with extensive, modular I/O capabilities that are electrically isolated from the microprocessor. Volatile memory is usually safeguarded by battery backup.

52 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 52 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers - Physical Structure INPUT PORTS MICRO- PROCESSOR OUTPUT PORTS SENSORS ACTUATORS KEYBOARD BATTERY

53 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 53 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers – Relays/Transistors (1) N S i Control Circuit Output Circuit Load Source Normally Open Relay Energize Control Circuit To Close

54 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 54 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers – Relays/Transistors (2) S N i Control Circuit Output Circuit Load Source Normally Closed Relay Energize Control Circuit to Open

55 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 55 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers – Module Control (2) S N i Relay Circuit Output Circuit Load Source LED from PLC closes Relay Circuit (Normally Closed or Open) Which, in turn, Activates Output Circuit S i LED PLC Control Circuit

56 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 56 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers - Programming Symbols Digital Logic Ladder Logic AND OR NOT INPUT OUTPUT TIMER OR AND NOT

57 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 57 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programmable Controllers - Programming Define Entities in the SystemDefine Entities in the System Develop Logical RelationshipsDevelop Logical Relationships Set up Digital and/or Ladder DiagramsSet up Digital and/or Ladder Diagrams Use Computer Aided Programming to check Syntax, Simulate OperationUse Computer Aided Programming to check Syntax, Simulate Operation

58 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 58 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems PLCs - Programming Example Definition Farmer Jones Problem (1)Farmer Jones Problem (1) –Farmer Jones has just been approached for lodging by a Traveling Salesman whose car has broken down. It is 100 miles to the nearest town with a motel. Farmer Jones’ daughter has expressed (positive) interest in the salesman, and his dog, Killer, has also expressed (negative) interest in the salesman.

59 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 59 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems PLCs - Programming Example Definition Farmer Jones Problem (2)Farmer Jones Problem (2) –Farmer Jones has a smart house and a smart barn. This allows him to receive a set of signals indicating who is where on the farm (he modified the cow ID tags!). –Develop the digital logic he needs in order to be advised of all potentially undesirable situations.

60 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 60 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programming Example Farmer Jones Problem (3)Farmer Jones Problem (3) –Step 1 – Identify all potentially undesirable situations Salesman and Killer alone together in either the barn or the house. Salesman and Daughter alone together in either the barn or the house.

61 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 61 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programming Example Farmer Jones Problem (4)Farmer Jones Problem (4) –Step 2 – Define Input A high (1) signal will indicate the individual is in the barn. A low (0) signal will indicate the individual is in the house.

62 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 62 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programming Example Farmer Jones Problem (5)Farmer Jones Problem (5) –Step 3 – Program Salesman/Daughter “Problems” Farmer (1) Killer (1) Salesman (0) Daughter (0) (1) Salesman (1) Daughter (1) Farmer (0) Killer (0) (1) Alarm

63 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 63 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programming Example Farmer Jones Problem (6)Farmer Jones Problem (6) –Step 4 – Program Salesman/Killer “Problems” Farmer (1) Daughter (1) Salesman (0) Killer (0) (1) Salesman (1) Killer (1) Farmer (0) Daughter(0) (1) Alarm

64 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 64 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Programming Example Farmer Jones Problem (7)Farmer Jones Problem (7) –Step 5 – Program Ladder Logic for Salesman/Killer “Problems” with 30 second delay. Timer 30 sec. F D K S Alarm F D K S Salesman/Daughter Problem (House (0)) Salesman/Daughter Problem (Barn (1)) Salesman/Killer Problem (House (0)) Salesman/Killer Problem (Barn (1))

65 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 65 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems PLCs and NC and Robots All CNCs and Robots Use PLCsAll CNCs and Robots Use PLCs Two FunctionsTwo Functions –Motion Control –Process Control

66 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 66 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Motion Control Send Pulse Train to Stepping MotorsSend Pulse Train to Stepping Motors –Control Rotation –Control Speed

67 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 67 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Process Control Input Signal to Controller (On/Off)Input Signal to Controller (On/Off) –Sensors Used to Detect Physical State Done Continuously –State of Signals Indicates Status Can be Interrupt Signal (e.g. Alt/Cntr/Del) Can be Polled (Cyclic Program Review) –Action Taken when Appropriate –Often Done in Background –Latching Circuit (Read like Memory Location)

68 © 2000 John W. NazemetzSlide 68 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems Motion and Process Control Within Program, Check Status of ProcessWithin Program, Check Status of Process –Machine Loading Check Status of Machine Door (Open) Before Robot Moves in to Remove/Load Part Check Part is in/out of Chuck/Robot Hand Before Moving –Path/Location Control Check Status of Position Sensors (Within Tolerance/Not) And Activate Correction Subroutine or Next Move

69 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment C Topic: Programmable Logic Controllers END OF SEGMENT


Download ppt "Advanced Manufacturing Systems Design © 2000 John W. Nazemetz Lecture 7 Topic : Numerical Control, Robotics, and Programmable Controllers Segment A Topic:"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google