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Importation of Invasive Species Joncarlo Alvarado, Muaz Billoo,Paolo Esguerra, Alexander Lin, Evan Tsiklidis,

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Presentation on theme: "Importation of Invasive Species Joncarlo Alvarado, Muaz Billoo,Paolo Esguerra, Alexander Lin, Evan Tsiklidis,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Importation of Invasive Species Joncarlo Alvarado, Muaz Billoo,Paolo Esguerra, Alexander Lin, Evan Tsiklidis,

2 What are Invasive Species?

3 - A species that are not native to a particular area, and whose introduction causes harm to other organisms. kidspages/images/cartoon1. JPG

4 Africanized Bees (Killer Bees) - They were imported from Africa in 1956 by Brazilian Scientists

5 Africanized Bees (Killer Bees) - They were imported from Africa in 1956 by Brazilian Scientists - In 1957, some bees escaped quarantine and they slowly bred with local Brazilian Honey Bees.

6 Africanized Bees (Killer Bees) - They were imported from Africa in 1956 by Brazilian Scientists - In 1957, some bees escaped quarantine and they slowly bred with local Brazilian Honey Bees. - They have slowly migrated to North America, and are now killing off local honey bees all over Mexico and some states in Southern United States. They have the same niche as the local honey bee's, except africanized bee's are more capable of surviving.

7 Africanized Bees (Killer Bees) Spreading bees.com/images/bee- map.jpg 4/images04/bee4.gif

8 How do they affect ourselves and other organisms? (1:40 - 2:36)

9 How do they affect ourselves and other organisms? - Africanized Bees defend their hives much more rapidly and aggressively than local honey bee's and are significantly more dangerous - They "suck up" nutrients that other organisms need. This can and does lead to a significant drop in other organisms population because their are less nutrients to be divided. - In some severe cases, africanized bees have taken human lives

10 How do they affect ourselves and other organisms? Source:

11 Solution? - The amount of Africanized Bee's have grown all over the South of the United States. - Pesticides appear to be the only option, however their are simply to many of them to eradicate them completely. * Africanized Bee's will most likely reach New York in just a few short years.*

12 Rabbits - In 1859, 12 rabbits were imported into Australia. - Due to the lack of significant predators in Australia, the rabbit population grew quickly. - Their current population in Australia has grown to over a million, and have caused the destruction of grass and soil all over the continent. Australian Rabbit

13 es/aap0022l.jpg Although just a cartoon, this summarizes how influential the rabbits have become in Australia.

14 How do they affect other organisms? - Since the rabbits have such a large population and eat most of the producers, there is less food for other organisms such as birds and insects.

15 How do they affect other organisms? - Since the rabbits have such a large population and eat most of the producers, there is less food for other organisms such as birds and insects. - As the rabbit population increases, many other organisms population decreases due to a shortage of food.

16 Solution? - In the mid 20th century, myxomatosis was introduced. This disease is fatal to rabbits and was believed to be the solution to the rabbit problem.

17 Solution? - In the mid 20th century, myxomatosis was introduced. This disease is fatal to rabbits and was believed to be the solution to the rabbit problem. - At first it appeared to be working as rabbits died all over the continent(about 99.5% of the rabbit population), however.....

18 Solution? - In the mid 20th century, myxomatosis was introduced. This disease is fatal to rabbits and was believed to be the solution to the rabbit problem. - At first it appeared to be working as rabbits died all over the continent(about 99.5% of the rabbit population), however The rabbits slowly developed a tolerance for the disease, and it stopped effecting them.

19 Solution? - In the mid 20th century, myxomatosis was introduced. This disease that was imported from Brazil, is fatal to rabbits and was believed to be the solution to the rabbit problem. - At first it appeared to be working as rabbits died all over the continent(about 99.5% of the rabbit population), however The rabbits slowly developed a tolerance for the disease, and it stopped effecting them. - Even if all the rabbits were removed from Australia, some animals have grown to depend on them. Eagles and other predators may also see a decline in population if rabbits were removed from the ecosystem.

20 Graph(tolerance to virus) mbiosis.html

21 f

22 CK_UPLOADS/RABBIT%20FEN CE%20FIG_%202.jpg This picture shows how large the rabbit problem is Australia has grown. Basic fences are needed just to protect certain areas from rabbits

23 Purple Loosestrife They inhabit many wetlands and freshwater areas.

24 How does it affect other Organisms? - It's ability to grow in different soils, as well as in different water depths allows it to outcompete many native aquatic vegetation such as cattails. - This can create problems with the habitat of some organisms that use the native vegetation, which can limit the biodiversity of flora and fauna

25 States infested by Loosestrife The Purple Loosestrife occupies 48 states 08/images/loosestrifedistribution jpg

26 Impact of Purple Loosestrife The estimated percentage of biomass between 1964 and Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge.

27 Solution? - Just like the rabbit population in Australia and the bee population in the South, there are simply to many Purple Loosestrife for pestisedes or chemicals to be effective. -Galerucella beetles are being tested on their impact on the purple loosestrife.

28 References Anderson, I. (2006) Rabbits in Australia. Retrieved from in-australia-enve-02/ Not, Available (1999, February 3). Definition of Invasive Species?. Retrieved from /DefineIS.html

29 References Continued Not, Available. (n.d.). Killer bee's. Retrieved from /kbees.html Shmidt, J.O. (2008, February 9). Dr.killer bee. Retrieved from Thompson, Daniel. (2006, September 22). Spread, impact, and control of purple loosestrife (lythrum salicaria) in North American Wetlands. Retrieved from npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/plats/losstrf/index.htm

30 References Continued Encyclopedia of LifeEncyclopedia of Life (Lead Author);USGS (Content Source);Stephen C. Nodvin (Topic Editor). "Purple loosestrife". In: Encyclopedia of Earth. Eds. Cutler J. Cleveland (Washington, D.C.: Environmental Information Coalition, National Council for Science and the Environment). [First published in the Encyclopedia of Earth October 27, 2009; Last revised Date October 27, 2009; Retrieved October 19, 2010 Stephen C. Nodvinhttp://www.eoearth.org/article/Purple_loosestrife


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