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1 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Mark Katsouros Director of Network Planning, Penn State Emergency Communications.

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Presentation on theme: "1 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Mark Katsouros Director of Network Planning, Penn State Emergency Communications."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Mark Katsouros Director of Network Planning, Penn State Emergency Communications Management & The Clery Act Improvements in ECM/ENS Capabilities Recommended Implementation Strategies, Requirements, & Desirables Implications of the Clery Act Mobile “Killer Apps”

2 2 Poll #1 Which best describes your interest in this webinar? (Please check all that apply.) 1.You want to learn more about recent improvements in ECM/ENS capabilities & how they might apply to you. 2.You’re about to embark on an ENS RFP, & are interested in recommended requirements & desirables. 3.You’re about to deploy an ENS, & are interested in recommended implementation strategies. 4.You’re interested in implications of the Clery Act. 5.You’re interested in learning more about mobile “killer apps.” 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

3 3  Within last 2-3 years: –(More-)Multi-modal (social networking, RSS, etc.) –Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping –Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) compliance –Single dashboard, but variant messages (for each mode) 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act ECM/ENS Capability Improvements

4 4  More recently: –Additional Integrations, via EDXL, RSS, Shib, etc. Sirens (Broadcast-capable) “Blue phones” Cisco VoIP phone broadcasting (via Singlewire) Digital signage Campus websites 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act ECM/ENS Capability Improvements

5 5  More recently (cont’d): –Campus-address-friendly GIS –More powerful message templates –Tiered messaging –More mobile-friendly 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act ECM/ENS Capability Improvements

6 6 Recommended Implementation Strategies  Emergency use only (no spam)  Pre-approved, pre-developed emergency templates  Text-to-speech (or, better yet, “blended”) notifications  Opt-out (vs. opt-in) for all relevant modes (See graph on next slide.) 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

7 7 Recommended Implementation Strategies Percentage of Institutions Surveyed that Use Each of Five Notification Types Source: Casey Green of The Campus Computing Project TM (http://www.campuscomputing.net). 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

8 8 Recommended Implementation Strategies Percentage of Institutions Surveyed that Still Use “Opt-in” (requiring sign-up to receive notifications) Source: Casey Green of The Campus Computing Project TM (http://www.campuscomputing.net). 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

9 9 Recommended Implementation Strategies  Branding  Leveraging the enterprise directory to automatically create groups  Being cognizant of the methods by which hosted solutions prioritize message delivery  Not adding parents to the notification contacts 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

10 10 Recommended Implementation Strategies  Weekly testing (by individual users)  Regular training (of all notifiers)  Institutional Policy on ENS use must be well-defined and well-documented!  Designing, implementing, & operating in a partnership between executive institutional leadership, campus police, risk, GC, UR, & IT! 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

11 11 Poll #2 Please answer the following policy-centric questions for your institution: 1.Do you use your ENS only for emergencies (including emergency weather closings)? Please answer “Yes” or “No” (or “Don’t know”). 2.Who sends emergency notifications? (Please select all that apply.) (1) Police / Public Safety / Security, (2) University/Public Relations/Communications, (3) Presidents Office, (4) Other, or (5) Don’t know? 3.Who provides follow-up communication? (Please select all that apply.) (1) Police / Public Safety / Security, (2) University/Public Relations/Communications, (3) Presidents Office, (4) Other, or (5) Don’t know? 4.Do you include parents of students in your emergency notification population? Please answer “Yes” or “No” (or “Don’t know”). 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

12 12 More Implementation Peer Data 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

13 13 Poll #3 Which one best describes your institution’s present situation? 1.You DO NOT HAVE an Emergency Notification System (ENS) in place. 2.You presently HAVE an ENS in place, but it is LIMITED to one or two modes. 3.You presently HAVE an ENS system in place that is MULTI- MODAL, but you are looking into alternative solutions, as it generally IS NOT MEETING YOUR NEEDS. 4.You presently HAVE an ENS in place that is MULTI-MODAL, & it generally IS MEETING YOUR NEEDS. 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

14 14 Recommended Requirements  Multimodal notifications – Voice calls, text messages (SMS/SMPP), , RSS, & social networking  Hosted (no local hardware)  High calling capacity w/a geo-dispersed communications infrastructure  Web-accessible (for notification initiators)  Electronic notification templates  Prerecorded, text-to-speech, & “blended” (combined) notification phrases 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

15 15 Recommended Requirements  Ability to throttle calls based on NPA/NXX  GIS mapping  Customizable branding  Group support (campus, departments, buildings, etc.)  Customizable Caller ID  Backend data transfer automation (either real-time- transaction- or batch-based)  Segmentation of system so as to be able to provide different notifying constituents w/separate contacts, templates, etc. 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

16 16 Recommended Requirements  Notification authentication –Interoperability w/Shibboleth –InCommon federation membership –Attributes per eduPerson Schema  Notification authorization –Interface capabilities w/LDAP v3 per RFC 4510 –Transport of data via Shibboleth 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

17 17 Recommended Desirables  Tiered logic Some of the following scenarios may be mutually exclusive, some may work in combination. The main idea is to provide a level of intelligence to the notification logic that optimizes resource utilization while maximizing notification effectiveness. This can best be done by recognizing both infrastructure constraints (i.e., enterprise landline trunks) & the diversity of individual circumstances/preferences (cell coverage issues, personal communication preferences, work schedules, etc). – 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

18 18 Recommended Desirables –Scenario 1: Desk phones only for those who can’t be reached by cell – Since calling many campus phones in a small window of time can be problematic & stress local infrastructure (or, w/throttling, simply take an unreasonable amount of time to complete), there’s a need to minimize the number of local phones being called. Mobile phones are an alternative, except that there are some significant pockets of low-to-no cell coverage on campus, such as in lower floors. So, when we have both a mobile & desk/work phone number for a person, it would probably make the most sense to 1st attempt to contact the person’s cell, & only try the desk/work phone if no live delivery could be made via cell. This tiered logic would ensure that we’re utilizing the local landline infrastructure as effectively as possible. 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

19 19 Recommended Desirables –Scenario 2: Multi-pass – It would be desirable to ensure that a distributed 1st tier of folks (1st responders, main department contacts, etc.) are contacted initially, followed by everyone else. The idea is to maximize word of mouth, which is most effective when the initial receivers are equally distributed. –Scenario 3: Non-medium-specific communication preferences – Allow for any 1 endpoint to be specified as “primary,” regardless of whether a phone number, SMS or e- mail address, etc. –Scenario 4: Time-of-day preferences – Allow the preferences above to be specified based on time of day (& day of week). 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

20 20 Recommended Desirables  Additional modes – “Sirens”/Loudspeakers, network pop-ups, video/CATV (digital TV & IP), instant messaging, fire panel alarms w/voice enunciation, digital signage (including changeable message signs on roads), 2-way radio, UC, etc.  (User-definable) Notification variable support (e.g., “location”), including speech phrase variables (in order to be able to reuse speech phrases, such as “This is PSU Police Chief Tyrone Parham. Please listen to this important PSU Alert.”) 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

21 21 Recommended Desirables  CAP and/or EDXL compliance  National EAS compatibility  Presence support (i.e., UC/calendar integration) towards an even-smarter tiered- logic approach  Campus address (building vs. street) support (in terms of GIS mapping)  Unlimited-usage (vs. pay-per-message) cost model 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

22 22 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act The Clery Act 1  Federal law enacted 1990 (last amended in 2000), following the murder & sexual assault of Jeanne Clery, a Lehigh University, & the discovery that campus had not been apprised of 38 violent crimes on campus in the 3 years preceding that attack.  Applies to all institutions receiving Federal Title IV student financial aid funds (e.g., virtually all of higher ed).  US Department of Education (ED) is charged w/enforcement.  Penalties –Fines of $27,500/incident –May even include revocation of institutional permission to participate in all federal student financial aid programs.  Clery Act Handbook available from “http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/handbook.pdf”.  Why is this relevant here? The Clery Act includes a "timely warning" provision for specific enumerated crimes. 1 - Some “Clery Act” slides liberally borrowed from Dr. Joe St Sauver’s “Mass Real Time Emergency Notification” a recent Internet2 Member Meeting, w/his kind permission.

23 23 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Timely Warning: 34cfr668.46(e) (1)An institution must, in a manner that is timely & will aid in the prevention of similar crimes, report to the campus community on crimes that are – (i) Described in paragraph (c)(1) & (3) of this section; (ii) Reported to campus security authorities as identified under the institution's statement of current campus policies pursuant to paragraph (b)(2) of this section or local police agencies; & (iii) Considered by the institution to represent a threat to students & employees. (2)An institution is not required to provide a timely warning w/respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor. [emphasis added to the above]

24 24 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Section c(1) Reportable Crimes (i) Criminal homicide: (A) Murder & non-negligent manslaughter. (B) Negligent manslaughter. (ii) Sex offenses: (A) Forcible sex offenses. (B) Non-forcible sex offenses. (iii) Robbery. (iv) Aggravated assault. (v) Burglary. (vi) Motor vehicle theft. (vii) Arson. (viii)(A)Arrests for liquor law violations, drug law violations, & illegal weapons possession. (B)[as (A), except referred for campus disciplinary action]

25 25 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Section c(3) Reportable Crimes Reported crimes if a hate crime: An institution must report, by category of prejudice, any crime it reports pursuant to paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section, & any other crime involving bodily injury reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority, that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability.

26 26 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Some Clery Act Questions From ED Clery Act Handbook, pages 75-76: "By now you are probably asking, "What do you mean by 'timely'?" & "How do you expect me to alert everyone?" Neither the Clery Act nor ED define "timely." The warning should be issued as soon as the pertinent information is available because the intent of a timely warning is to alert the campus community of continuing threats especially concerning safety, thereby enabling community members to protect themselves. [emphasis added] "Although the format for the warning has not been mandated, the notice must be timely & reasonably likely to reach the entire campus community & aid in the prevention of similar crimes. Therefore, timely warnings must be issued in a manner that gets the word out quickly communitywide. They may be ed, posted around campus, or otherwise distributed according to your institution’s policy. A combination of dissemination methods may be used. Timely warnings may not be issued in a manner or posted in a location that requires the campus community to make requests for them or to search for them. The responsibility for the warning rests solely w/the institution."

27 27 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Lessons Penn State  An ED statement announcing an investigation into Penn State's handling of the Sandusky case mentions both the annual reporting & timely warning requirements.  The investigation also reported “a lack of awareness of child abuse issues, the Clery Act, & whistle-blower policies & protections.”

28 28 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Lessons Penn State  Awareness training & clear reporting policies are critical. (Almost all of us are mandatory reporters.)  A handful of universities have been fined under the Clery Act since its inception: –Virginia Tech (2007 rampage) –Eastern Michigan University (Laura Dickinson murder, 2006) –Salem International University (2005 annual report) –Mount St. Clare College / Ashford University (2000 annual report)

29 29 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act Lessons Penn State  In the past five years, the ED has ramped up Clery Act enforcement. It now has a staff dedicated solely to conducting investigations. It also has partnered w/the FBI to audit a random sample of universities, a practice that has revealed widespread problems w/crime data reporting & a lack of policies to ensure compliance.  PSU officials, including the school's president, Rodney Erickson, have pledged that Penn State will be a leader nationally in the dialogue about and fight against child abuse.  Penn State’s Clery compliance coordinator, Gabriel Gates, said the University “strives to exceed the requirements of the Clery Act” and that “We aim to build a higher education community standard of excellence.”  To read Penn State’s Annual Security Report, visit “http://www.police.psu.edu/cleryact/documents/UniversityParkPolicySaf etyU2012.pdf”.

30 30 Poll #4 How well does your institution comply with the Clery Act? Please answer each question with “Yes” or “No” (or “Don’t know”). 1.Do you have an ENS in place that is “timely & reasonably likely to reach the entire campus community?” 2.Do you have a dedicated Clery compliance officer? 3.Do you produce an annual safety & security report? 2/28/2013ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

31 31 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Emerg. Radio Free 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

32 32 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

33 33 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

34 34 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

35 35 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

36 36 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Mobile Alert 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

37 37 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have WebMD Mobile  Emergency health diagnostics  First-aid feature that works w/o an internet connection –CPR instructions –How to put a broken arm in a sling –Etc. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

38 38 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have First Aid (by American Red Cross)  Step-by-step instructions for handling everyday emergencies  Instructional videos  Mostly locally-stored content  Built-in & EMS call buttons 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

39 39 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Hurricane, Earthquake, Wildfire (by American Red Cross)  Suite of disaster-specific apps  Disaster preparedness  Disaster tracking  Evacuation routes  Etc. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

40 40 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have FEMA  Disaster preparedness  Maps of disaster shelters  Emergency numbers  Etc. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

41 41 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have GotoAID  Runs the full gamut of medical care—everything from bee stings to broken bones.  Same for natural disaster preparedness—snowstorms, volcanic eruption, damn failure, landslides, etc.  Morse code translator/transmitter  No longer free. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

42 42 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Emergency Flashlight  A flashlight when the real thing is unavailable  Uses phone’s camera flash.  SOS feature Beware: Prolonged use drains battery. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

43 43 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Red Panic Button  Sends panic & text message to list of people you set up.  Sends coordinates to emergency contacts.  Posts to Facebook & Twitter. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

44 44 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Disaster Readiness  More e-book than app.  Contains over 275,000 disaster guides—from terrorist attacks to chemical emergencies.  No longer free. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

45 45 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have Disaster Alert  Created by the Pacific Disaster Center.  Alerts users to every natural disaster & "active hazards" happening on the Pacific coast.  When traveling, there’s a global view so you can see what disasters & hazards are happening all over the world. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

46 46 Free Mobile “Killer Apps” Everyone Should Have AroundMe  Some may not see as emergency app, but handy when disaster strikes.  Use it to find gas stations, hospitals, pharmacies, etc, wherever you are. 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act

47 47 Q&A Thank you! 2/28/2013 ELive! Webinar: Emergency Communications and the Clery Act


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