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Notes on the Poetry Essay: A: Free Choice – Tone B: “Jocasta” by Ruth F. Eisenberg.

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Presentation on theme: "Notes on the Poetry Essay: A: Free Choice – Tone B: “Jocasta” by Ruth F. Eisenberg."— Presentation transcript:

1 Notes on the Poetry Essay: A: Free Choice – Tone B: “Jocasta” by Ruth F. Eisenberg

2 THE BREAKDOWN  16 Prompt A: Free Choice from Summer Reading  6 upper half / 10 lower half  Wide variety of topics and time periods in poems explored: “To Althea, From Prison,” “Hippopotamus,” “Body’s Beauty,” “London, 1802,” “To The Virgins, To Make Much Of Time” (popular, among males only), “Po’ Boy Blues,” “Ozymanidas” (also a dude poem), “To His Coy Mistress,” “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers,” “Death Be Not Proud,” “Mending Wall,” “The Tiger and the Lamb,” “Hysteria,” “Blackberry Picking”  11 Prompt B: “Jocasta”  7 upper half / 4 lower half

3 WHAT IS (MOSTLY) WORKING:  Writing demonstrates thoughtful understanding of poetry and depth of analysis  Clearly identified MOWAW (more than plot or theme)  Improvement in identifying specific literary devices AND their function  Sophisticated vocabulary and syntax  Some well-crafted thesis statements!  Appropriate text support

4 A PRETTY PERFECT POSITION… In his poem, “To Althea, From Prison,” Richard Lovelace uses a controlling metaphor and a peaceful, content tone despite being locked in prison, to examine the idea that freedom rests in the mind, not in the body....With the use of a controlling metaphor comparing himself to a caged bird that still has the freedom to sing, as well as a tone of tranquility, Lovelace conveys his attitude of disregard towards Parliament and prison.

5 A PRETTY PERFECT POSITION… In his poem, “To Althea, From Prison,” Richard Lovelace uses a controlling metaphor and a peaceful, content tone despite being locked in prison, to examine the idea that freedom rests in the mind, not in the body....With the use of a controlling metaphor comparing himself to a caged bird that still has the freedom to sing, as well as a tone of tranquility, Lovelace conveys his attitude of disregard towards Parliament and prison.

6 A PRETTY PERFECT POSITION… In his poem, “To Althea, From Prison,” Richard Lovelace uses a controlling metaphor and a peaceful, content tone despite being locked in prison, to examine the idea that freedom rests in the mind, not in the body....With the use of a controlling metaphor comparing himself to a caged bird that still has the freedom to sing, as well as a tone of tranquility, Lovelace conveys [an] attitude of disregard towards Parliament and prison.

7 MAKE IT SO…MARK IT UP! In his poem, “To Althea, From Prison,” Richard Lovelace uses a controlling metaphor and a peaceful, content tone despite being locked in prison, to examine the idea that freedom rests in the mind, not in the body....With the use of a controlling metaphor comparing himself to a caged bird that still has the freedom to sing, as well as a tone of tranquility, Lovelace conveys his attitude of disregard towards Parliament and prison.

8 APPROPRIATE EVIDENCE, IF NOT ANALYSIS… Within the poem, Eisenberg employs metaphor and juxtaposition to highlight the contrast between the highest high and the lowest low of Jocasta’s life. Once Jocasta is married to Oedipus (unaware he is her son), she spouts “I am the poppies / bright little blooms with milk in them,” and “I walk among the roses, feel / [Aphrodite’s] blush upon my cheeks.” Once she discovers he is not who she believes, her “flesh crawls with worms.” These metaphors are put in place in order to make her emotions less abstract, and therefore more relatable. These changes in her feelings mark the change in tone and better describe them so the audience could note the difference. By juxtaposing the two very contrasting moods, Eisenberg places an emphasis on the situation that Jocasta is suffering in.

9 APPROPRIATE EVIDENCE, IF NOT ANALYSIS… Within the poem, Eisenberg employs metaphor and juxtaposition to highlight the contrast between the highest high and the lowest low of Jocasta’s life. Once Jocasta is married to Oedipus (unaware he is her son), she spouts “I am the poppies / bright little blooms with milk in them,” and “I walk among the roses, feel / [Aphrodite’s] blush upon my cheeks.” Once she discovers he is not who she believes, her “flesh crawls with worms.” These metaphors are put in place in order to make her emotions less abstract, and therefore more relatable. These changes in her feelings mark the change in tone and better describe them so the audience could note the difference. By juxtaposing the two very contrasting moods, Eisenberg places an emphasis on the situation that Jocasta is suffering in.

10 APPROPRIATE EVIDENCE, IF NOT ANALYSIS… Within the poem, Eisenberg employs metaphor and juxtaposition to highlight the contrast between the highest high and the lowest low of Jocasta’s life. Once Jocasta is married to Oedipus (unaware he is her son), [Jocasta gushes] spouts “I am the poppies / bright little blooms with milk* in them,” and “I walk among the roses, feel / [Aphrodite’s*] blush upon my cheeks.” Once she discovers [Oedipus] is not who she [at first believed], her “flesh crawls with worms*.” These metaphors are put in place in order to make [Jocasta’s] emotions less abstract, and therefore more relatable. These changes in her feelings mark the change in tone and better describe them so the audience could note the difference. By juxtaposing the two very contrasting moods, Eisenberg places an emphasis on the situation that Jocasta is suffering in. *Needs analysis!

11 MAKE IT SO…MARK IT UP! Within the poem, Eisenberg employs metaphor and juxtaposition to highlight the contrast between the highest high and the lowest low of Jocasta’s life. Once Jocasta is married to Oedipus (unaware he is her son), she spouts “I am the poppies / bright little blooms with milk in them,” and “I walk among the roses, feel / [Aphrodite’s] blush upon my cheeks.” Once she discovers he is not who she believes, her “flesh crawls with worms.” These metaphors are put in place in order to make her emotions less abstract, and therefore more relatable. These changes in her feelings mark the change in tone and better describe them so the audience could note the difference. By juxtaposing the two very contrasting moods, Eisenberg places an emphasis on the situation that Jocasta is suffering in.

12 WHAT NEEDS WORK:  Still struggling to identify the MOWAW  Discussing specific literary devices AND their function (in other words, HOW they illuminate MOWAW)  Attempting to do too much: multiple themes, meanings and messages and/or device-o-rama  History lessons, cheerleading, plot and platitudes  Writing to fill space

13 HOW DOES FUNCTION DETERMINE FORM?  Eisenberg’s use of a both foreboding and somber tone along with foreshadowing illustrates the plight of a woman who lacks agency in her life and pays the consequences. When looked at from a broader scope, Eisenberg’s poem serves as a cautionary tale towards women and the dangers of passiveness.  The author uses metaphor and internal monologue to recreate Jocasta’s perspective....Eisenberg critically analyzes Oedipus Rex to elaborate on Jocasta’s side of the story. By employing a shift in tone from passionate to distraught, Eisenberg shows Jocasta’s powerlessness in society.

14 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  In her poem “Jocasta,” Ruth F. Eisenberg re-imagines “Oedipus” through a contemporary feminist lens with success, due to her employment of a variety of different literary devices, such as imagery, perspective, and tone, which throughout the poem ranges from dark and hollow to peaceful and light-hearted. Eisenberg makes these devices function with her use of structure and diction, and, along with the contemporary feminist lens she gives the poem, accomplishes her purpose to make a statement advocating women’s rights and to also give women a voice in literature.

15 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  In her poem “Jocasta,” Ruth F. Eisenberg re-imagines “Oedipus” through a contemporary feminist lens with success, due to her employment of a variety of different literary devices, such as imagery, perspective, and tone, which throughout the poem ranges from dark and hollow to peaceful and light-hearted. Eisenberg makes these devices function with her use of structure and diction, and, along with the contemporary feminist lens she gives the poem, accomplishes her purpose to make a statement advocating women’s rights and to also give women a voice in literature.

16 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  The poem seeks not only to mock the lack of domination this ruler has, but also to criticize all dictators and tyrants who naively believe in the immortality of their legacy and reign. To achieve these purposes and goals, Shelley uses a majestic tone in order to mock Ozymandias, and utilizes a myriad of literary devices such as allusions, personification, and irony to illustrate that all great rulers, no matter how invincible they might seem, are mortal beings, and will fall.

17 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  The poem seeks not only to mock the lack of domination this ruler has, but also to criticize all dictators and tyrants who naively believe in the immortality of their legacy and reign. To achieve these purposes and goals, Shelley uses a majestic tone in order to mock Ozymandias, and utilizes a myriad of literary devices such as allusions, personification, and irony to illustrate that all great rulers, no matter how invincible they might seem, are mortal beings, and will fall.

18 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  By crafting a proud and hollow image of “Death,” John Donne executes a dramatic anti-thesis to the ominous figure of eternal rest; in “Death be Not Proud” as a result, he is able to utilize an assortment of literary devices including, but not limited to, imagery, personification, and rhytmic patterns. Despite this mockery of “Death”, Donne expertly plays on the reader’s fear of “Death”, not by empowering their fear, but by supressing it, he further instills the confidence required to live life to its fullest extent.

19 AVOID TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH  By crafting a proud and hollow image of “Death,” John Donne executes a dramatic anti-thesis to the ominous figure of eternal rest; in “Death be Not Proud” as a result, he is able to utilize an assortment of literary devices including, but not limited to, imagery, personification, and rhytmic patterns. Despite this mockery of “Death”, Donne expertly plays on the reader’s fear of “Death”, not by empowering their fear, but by suppressing it, he further instills the confidence required to live life to its fullest extent.

20 YOU, THE EXPERT?  When standing at the face of tradition, we have all been able to defend our reasons for our beliefs.  When it comes to love, many would argue that it should be had during youth, in order to fully take advantage of youthful characteristics that can make love more enjoyable.  Eisenberg’s “Jocasta” beautifully manipulates the imagery, metaphor, and repetition of words in such a way that it reimagines the human condition of woman.  The 1970’s was a time in which women were just beginning to collect rights—feminists fought for equal treatment. A new demnd for more literature with female leads.

21 AND PLOTTING ON…  In “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers,” author Adrienne Rich takes on the perspective of a niece or nephew who acts as a sympathetic fly on the wall of a timid and unhappy woman only known to the audience as Aunt Jennifer.  In her poem “Jocasta,” Ruth Eisenberg recounts the life and tribulations of Oedipus’ wife.

22 AND ON AND ON AND ON…  In the poem “Hysteria”, TS Eliot quite accurately describes the subject, a hostess of a tea party, by so revealing her current and true state of melancholic emotion By the use of describing her actions through a desperate and despairing lens, Eliot highlights the mask which this woman hids and buries herself under. Also, by writing in a free verse and blunt style using no meter of any kind the reader is forced to see that nothing is what it seems, for a woman that smiles, she may not be joyful but instead use it as a means of camoflage, to cover another darker disposition entirely.

23 AND ON AND ON AND ON…  The epic tale of Oedipus is given a new perspective in the modern and pro-feminist poem, “Jocasta.” Ruth Eisenberg utilizes a highly personal point of view as Jocasta tells her story both candidly and emotionally. Throughthe use of sensitory extended metaphor and foreshadowing blinded by love, “Jocasta” gives light to paralleling allusions and adds dimmension to Oedipus Rex. With it’s feminist angle of the story, “Jocasta” reshapes the views of fate and free-will discussed in its precursor.

24 FINALLY, OWN IT WITH A TITLE  __________________________  Poetry Poem  Seize the Day

25 FINALLY, OWN IT WITH A TITLE Seize the Day: The Urgency of Love and Youth in Robert Herrick’s “To The Virgins, To Make Much of Time”


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