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Welcome to the April General Assembly!. Announcements.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the April General Assembly!. Announcements."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the April General Assembly!

2 Announcements

3 CWRU Psychology Clinic Gender Researchers Meet & Greet - April 23 rd, 5-7:30 pm (Women’s Center): Meet & greet for all the gender researchers on campus; - Find interdepartmental coauthors, faculty members to sit on your committee, and social support from other researchers interested in similar topics! - I’m collecting contact information for everyone who studies gender (graduate students & faculty) so that I can invite them, please let me know who in your department studies gender issues.

4 GSS Year-End Celebration ALL senators and executives are invited. If you have not received an invitation, please let Queenie know at hxc319@case.edu

5 GSS Year-End Celebration Three awards will be presented: an Outstanding Senator, Outstanding Executive and Graduate Student Organization of the Year. Outstanding Senator – selected by GSS executive board (3/23) Outstanding Executive – selected by GSS senators (Please fill out the ballots during GA today and give them to Queenie before you leave.) Outstanding Graduate Student Organization – SAL/ Tirth

6 Graduate & Professional Student Appreciation Week GPSAW 2015: Schedule- https://students.case.edu/events/gpsa week/https://students.case.edu/events/gpsa week/ Kick-Off Pizza Party- April 6 th 12-1:30pm -Free! Please pass on to constituents! -Need volunteers. 19 awesome events from partners across campus! 26 special deals when you show you ID (Arts, culture, entertai nment, fitness, food and retail)

7 Alumni Networking Night RSVP Online! “How to Network” THIS Friday at 12:30 Clapp Hall

8 Activities Committee Update Melody Maxson

9 Health & Wellness Committee Update Stacey Chung

10 Student Medical Plan Updates Dental Plan (Aetna or Discounted option) Vision plan (discounted) Integrate Pharmacy & Medical Plan (no more CVS caremark) Out of pocket max (TBD; currently $5000) Trying to see if Co-insurance or Co-pay can be adjusted Deductible is still $100 Will update website https://students.case.edu/health/

11 University Counseling Services - Perception & Awareness - Appointments- UCS (Sears building) & UHS - Tiers based on urgency - Ways to improve graduate student mental health & wellness - https://students.case.edu/counseling/

12 Athletics Facility - Kristin Conway, Athletics Facilities Supervisor kec76@case.edu - Suggestion Box - Upcoming: - Remodeling website - Install directories in Veale - Intramural sport hours

13 CWRU Psychology Clinic New Graduate Student Alumni Mentorship Program Launch - Recruitment update: 57 graduate students applied to be mentees 46 alumni applied to be mentors -Matching soon -Standardize workflow for the program

14 CWRU Psychology Clinic GSS Resolution 2015.01 Travel and Research Funding Why? Graduate students at CWRU best represent the university by presenting at leading national and international conferences in their fields. Quality research funding is key to scholarly impact and progress toward degree. More than 2/3 of our peer institutions are offering better travel and / or research funding from the university level. Students with lower stipends receive less support for travel and research.

15 CWRU Psychology Clinic GSS Resolution 2015.01 Travel and Research Funding What? University leadership leads the major fundraising offices in developing new and enhanced sources for funding graduate student travel and research. Graduate students will have voting membership on any task force assigned to improving travel and research funding. Equitable availability of new funds. No negative impact on students. Ambitious goal: top third in three years, leader among peers in six years.

16 CWRU Psychology Clinic Appendix A: CWRU compared with twelve peer institutions 1.Emory University 2.Duke University 3.Carnegie Mellon University 4.Brandeis University 5.New York University 6.Vanderbilt University 7. Northwestern University 8. University of Rochester 9. Johns Hopkins University 10. CWRU 11. Washington U, St. Louis 12. Syracuse University 13. University of Chicago * Rankings are based on inexact comparison because each university funds differently. Determining factors included size of travel and research awards, frequency with which students can access awards during their careers, and availability of awards to aid students in disciplines that, at CWRU, tend to receive less departmental assistance for travel and research.

17 CWRU Psychology Clinic Appendix B: Funding at CWRU *Data taken from GSS stipend survey. Travel Funding by School: 1.Engineering 2.Biomedical Sciences 3.Arts & Sciences 4.MSASS 5.Nursing 6.Weatherhead *Significant gap between top two and bottom four schools. Funding and Stipend Size: Statistically significant correlation between stipend size and travel / research funding. (Higher stipends = more funding; lower stipends = less funding.) Stipends perceived to be less competitive correspond to higher need to use stipends to cover travel expenses.

18 CWRU Psychology Clinic Appendix C: Recent Actions Taken By GSS 1.Spring 2014: Expanded Verhosek Fund travel grant to $250 by shifting $50 for thesis binding toward travel funding. 2.Spring 2014: Voted to increase student activity fee (0.1% of tuition credit hour, roughly $1) to enhance V-Fund endowment. 3.Fall 2014: Contributed $10,000 of 2013-14 budget surplus to V-Fund principal. 4.Spring 2015: Requested modifications to SGS Travel Award. (Eliminate $1,000 international option; Distribute award over three separate terms for greater accessibility.)

19 CWRU Psychology Clinic GSS Resolution 2015.01 Travel and Research Funding VOTE! Yes or No Based on March 16, 2015 meeting with university leaders, there is a strong indication that this resolution will be supported and acted upon by the President, the Provost, and the School of Graduate Studies. Questions? Email Ray Horton, GSS VP rlh137@case.edu

20 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Acknowledgements—THANK YOU! Nirmala Lekhak (TF) Melody Maxson (TF) Michael Bane (TF) John Baden (TF) Imre Treufeld (TF) Katherine Schaub (TF) Jenny Birkrant (TF) Hannah Bergman (Vol) Claire Wallace (Vol) David Bradley (Vol) Alex Uzdavines (Vol) Chantal Van Esch (TF) Christine May (TF) Nick Stauner (Vol) GSS O&A Chair Tirth Bhatta GSS President Queenie Cheong GSS VP Ray Horton GSS CAS Exec Shu Situ SAO Assoc. Director Jennifer Brown SAO Director Colleen Barker- Williamson Assoc. Dean Lynmarie Hamel (GS) Director of Institutional Research Jean Gubbins Dean Cyrus Taylor (CAS) Dean Charles Rozek (GS) Deputy Provost Lynn Singer Provost and Exec VP Bud Baeslack President Barbara Snyder And many more!

21 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results N = 699 Participants* 598 Complete + 101 Partial 507 Doctoral + 188 Masters + 4 Staff/Faculty About 30% of GSS constituency 49.3% female, 48.5% male, 2.2% other Analyzed the doctoral student data only See report for survey questions *185 Missing removed

22 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Table 1: Number of Doctoral Survey Participants by School Schooln Percent of Participants Percent of the Doctoral Students within that School Arts and Sciences20340.0%59.9% Biomedical Sciences/Investigation15029.0%35.6% (?) Engineering9719.1%26.9% FPBS Nursing244.7%54.5% Weatherhead224.3%16.9% MSASS112.2%25% Total507100%

23 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Table 3: Number (Cumulative Percent within School) of doctoral students who… OverallArts/Sci Biomed Sci/Inv.EngineeringNursingMSASSWSOM Never received a stipend30 (6.7%)6 (3.3%)5 (3.7%)6 (7.6%)7 (31.8%)2 (20%)4 (22.2%) Stipend now $017 (10.5%)6 (6.6%)1 (4.5%)6 (15.2%)--- 4 (44.4%) $1 to $11,970 (Federal Poverty Line)48 (21.3%)25 (20.2%)5 (8.2%)4 (20.3%)10 (77.3%)4 (40%)--- $11,971 to $12,50018 (25.3%)15 (28.4%)--- 1 (81.8%)1 (50%) $12,501 to $16,826 (CWRU Undergrad Cost of Living)47 (35.9%)42 (51.4%)1 (9%)2 (22.8%)2 (90.9%)--- $16,827 to $17,194 (2010 CLE Living Wage)4 (36.8%)--- 4 (27.8%)--- $17,195 to $20,00046 (47.1%)33 (69.4%)1 (9.7%)7 (36.7%)---3 (100%)2 (61.1%) $20,001 to $25,000102 (70%)50 (96.7%)12 (18.7%)33 (78.5%)2 (100%)---5 (88.9%) Above $25,000134 (100%)6 (100%)109 (100%)17 (100%)--- 2 (100%)

24 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Table 6: Percentiles of doctoral students stipends amounts overall and by school Percentile Overall Arts & Sciences Bio. Sciences EngineeringNursing MSASSWSOM 10 th $6,000$8,000$25,000$1,680$6,000$650$0 25 th $15,297$12,000$27,000$19,000$6,000$3,000$0 33 rd $18,000$15,000$27,500$20,680$6,000$5,880$11,400 50 th $23,000$17,500$27,500$24,000$6,000$10,740$20,080 66 th $25,000$20,000$27,500$25,000$9,360$17,640$20,940 75 th $27,500$23,000$27,500$25,000$13,000$18,000$21,900 90 th $27,500$24,000$27,500$29,000$22,800$18,000$30,000 100 th $36,000$32,000 $36,000$24,000$18,000$30,000 Note: Federal Poverty Line = $11,970; CWRU Undergrad Cost of Living = $16,826; 2010 Cleveland Minimum Living Wage Estimate = $17,194

25 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Table 8: Comparison of Stipend Related Variables Between Schools School Stipend Satisfaction (1-7) Mean (SD) Stipend Mean (SD) Stipend Competitiveness (1-4) Mean (SD) Arts and Sciences3.66 (1.79) AB $16,913.71 ($6,574.96) AB 1.77 (.07) A Biomedical Sciences4.59 (1.53) AC $26,108.98 ($5,352.50) ACD 2.14 (.66) A Engineering4.59 (1.51) BD $21,951.48 ($8,621.86) AB 2.09 (.73) Nursing2.46 (2.07) CD $9,261.54 ($6,533.70) BC 1.80 (.92) MSASS3.50 (1.92)$13,500.00 ($5,744.56) D 2.00 (.82) WSOM4.45 (1.70)$17,836.36 ($10,108.84) C 2.00 (.94) Similar superscripts in the same column denote significant differences between those two schools.

26 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Higher stipends linked to… Greater satisfaction with research progress Higher motivation to succeed with: Professional achievements Research progress Stipends are more sufficient in: Covering basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Additional income/funds are less necessary to: Cover basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Stipends perceived as more competitive Greater satisfaction with stipends

27 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Higher stipend satisfaction linked to… Greater satisfaction with Professional achievements Research progress Stipends are more sufficient in Covering basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Additional income/funds are less necessary to Cover basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Stipends perceived as more competitive Higher overall life satisfaction Less negative mood in general

28 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Higher perceived stipend competitiveness linked to… Greater satisfaction with professional development Stipends are more sufficient in Covering basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Additional income/funds are less necessary to Cover basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Higher overall life satisfaction

29 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Over 7% use stipend to pay for tuition Over 22% have stipends that end before expected graduation Over 70% of students report supplementing their stipend income Over 70% consider this to be “Some” to “Completely” necessary to meet their basic living expenses.

30 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results The larger the program is… The higher are stipends Stipends are more sufficient in Covering basic living expenses Helping maintain physical and psychological well-being Helping reach professional and research goals Additional income/funds are less necessary to Helping reach professional and research goals Stipend variables do not mediate any links between program size and variables re: satisfaction, motivation,or well-being = reducing program size is not an effective way to increase stipends, student well-being, satisfaction, or motivation

31 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results by Program Results are also reported by program in the report, alongside benchmark data Please keep the AAUDE data confidential A non-confidential report to be emailed out soon Per Grad Studies, lowest stipend Clinical Psychology PhD (6 year program) at $12,000/year for 4 years Per Grad Studies, highest stipends Biomedical Studies programs at $27,500/year However…

32 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Grad Studies’ numbers for most programs only represent the 1 st year. Students in a variety of programs report receiving less than Grad Studies listed, some even getting $0 Stipends vary greatly by student, year/cohort, and program.

33 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Many programs’ 1 st year stipends fall below stipends of Case’s aspirational institutions

34 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Several programs’ 1 st year stipends fall below benchmark data: 1.Anthropology PhD; MA/PhD; PhD/MPH 2.Clinical Psychology PhD 3.English PhD 4.History PhD 5.Mathematics PhD 6.Mathematics (Applied) PhD 7.Music (Historical Performance Practice) DMA 8.Computer Engineering PhD 9.Nursing PhD 10.Bioethics PhD 11.Computing and Information Sciences PhD (for some students) 12.Electrical Engineering (for some students) 13.Systems and Control Engineering PhD (for some) 14.Design and Innovation PhD 15.Designing Sustainable Systems PhD 16.Probably more

35 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Several programs’ 1 st year stipends fall below or near the 2010 minimum living wage estimate for Cleveland: 1.Anthropology PhD; MA/PhD; PhD/MPH 2.English PhD 3.History PhD (1 st year only) 4.Mathematics PhD 5.Mathematics (Applied) PhD 6.Music (Historical Performance Practice) DMA 7.Musicology PhD (current students) 8.Sociology PhD 9.Bioethics PhD 10.Probably more

36 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Several programs’ 1 st year stipends fall below or near the federal poverty line: 1.Clinical Psychology PhD 2.Music Education PhD 3.Nursing PhD 4.History PhD (after 1 st year) 5.Physics PhD (for some) 6.Computer Engineering PhD 7.Computing and Information Sciences PhD (for some) 8.Electrical Engineering (for some) 9.Systems and Control Engineering PhD (for some) 10.Design and Innovation PhD 11.Designing Sustainable Systems PhD 12.Probably more

37 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Remember, these are first year stipends. More than 25% of students report losing their stipends before their program’s expected graduation.

38 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Qualitative results are also telling. Look at the report! Many depend on an outside job, family, or partner’s income At least one student is on food stamps while many others qualify for similar government assistance Several students are in debt, some over $100,000 Many were unaware that their stipend would decrease or be gone altogether at some point in their program Some students believe that all Case grad students receive the same stipend Most students live with a partner or roommate to split costs

39 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Students use a wide variety of strategies to cut costs Most students want this issue addressed Several reported extending their time in program due to having to take on outside work to cover basic living expenses

40 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Survey Results Summary 1.Stipends are a significant concern for many students, several falling below competitive levels, a 2010 estimate of Cleveland minimum living wage, and even the federal poverty line. 2.Stipends are consistently linked to student productivity and well-being. 3.Students are unclear about the details of their stipends. 4.Many stipends decrease or end before expected graduation. 5.Reducing program size OR the stipends of other programs are not effective means to increase stipends or maintain/improve student well-being.

41 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolution Purpose Request that the University 1.significantly increase transparency around graduate student stipends, 2.improve competitiveness of graduate student stipends in comparison to similar programs at other universities, 3.and identify and address graduate student stipend issues associated with graduate student well-being and productivity.

42 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 1. Resolved, that the university provide an annual stipend equal to or more than current estimates for minimum living wage in Cleveland (e.g., adjusted amount based on 2010 estimate $17,194) to all doctoral students until their program’s expected graduation date

43 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 2. Resolved, that for each program, the university intentionally and annually establish and provide competitive stipend amounts that support student well- being and productivity

44 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 3. Resolved, that within this process, the university first address those stipends that fall below Cleveland living wage estimates, beginning with those below or near the poverty line and those that end before their program’s expected graduation

45 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 4. Resolved, that the university ensures students are fully informed of the stipends and tuition waivers they are guaranteed to receive each year, starting when the student is made an offer to attend

46 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 5. Resolved, that the university post and annually update a publicly accessible online list of each program’s baseline stipend, range of stipend by program year, benchmark data, and years of tuition waivers

47 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 6. Resolved, that the university and graduate student government annually review stipend, tuition waiver, and benchmark data to ensure competitive stipends and tuition coverage for all programs

48 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 7. Resolved, that the university track data on applicants who do not accept offers based on stipend and tuition support and report this information to graduate student government

49 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 8. Resolved, that graduate student representatives shall be given voting membership on any university task forces and committees established for the purpose of addressing tuition and stipend funding, and that said representatives shall be appointed by graduate student government

50 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 9. Resolved, that each school’s management centers present a plan to the university and graduate student government by September 1, 2015 for how they will increase all low stipends within each school to at least minimum living wage for the Cleveland area and identify competitive stipend goals for each program within their school

51 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 10. Resolved, that any financial actions taken on behalf of this resolution will not negatively impact any other remuneration or compensation currently offered to graduate students, including stipends currently above the minimum living wage or competitive levels, nor on student enrollment, faculty employment, faculty hiring, or the funding and budgets of those departments that are currently poorly funded

52 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions 11. Resolved, that this resolution be sent to the following individuals listed in the resolution

53 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends: Resolutions Questions or concerns re: the resolution? Errors to the report?

54 GSS Resolution 2015.02 Graduate Student Stipends VOTE! Yes or No Based on meetings on March 11 th, 16 th, and 25 th, 2015, with university leaders, there is a strong indication that this resolution will be supported and acted upon by the President, the Provost, the Deputy Provost, and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Questions? Contact Steffany Homolka Stipend Task Force Chair and Psychological Sciences Senator sjh100@case.edu

55 Stipend Survey Report and GSS Resolution on Stipends Thank you!

56 Graduate Student Council: What’s next? - Vote passed! - GSS: 26 in favor, 7 against, 1 abstain - GPC: 22 in favor, 0 against, 0 abstain - Upcoming this month: - Recruit representatives for election - Informational event for those interested in executive positions in Mid-April - Nominations for executive positions due one week before elections - Elections for executive positions end of April - More information to come soon by e-mail! - Questions, comments? E-mail gss-gpc@case.edu

57 Graduate Student Council: Student Funding and Finances Committee Idea brought about from the stipend, travel funding task forces of GSS Brought idea to GPC executive team, they want to get more information about committee purpose, bring to their constituents, but supportive of idea Support for idea also from GSC’s partners More deliberation needed, will be brought to new government Questions, Comments? E-mail gss-gpc@case.edu

58 New Business –Comments on the Year? –Announcements? Motion to Adjourn? –Second?


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