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OWENS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISABILITY SERVICES Volunteer Notetaker Training 5/11/20151Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training.

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Presentation on theme: "OWENS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISABILITY SERVICES Volunteer Notetaker Training 5/11/20151Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 OWENS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISABILITY SERVICES Volunteer Notetaker Training 5/11/20151Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training

2 Congratulations on being selected as a Volunteer Notetaker for Disability Services! Read the guidelines located on the back of the Volunteer Notetaker Card, fill-out the back side of the card, and return it to Disability Services (Alumni Hall 103 on the Toledo Campus or Enrollment Services, room 112 on the Findlay Campus. ) Review this PowerPoint presentation and send an to to let us know that you completed the Here are a few items you need to complete: 5/11/20152Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training

3 Why does Disability Services provide notetaking accommodations? The Government has established laws to protect the civil rights of citizens/students with disabilities. For further information, click on the following links. –Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) –Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of /11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 3

4 Students eligible for notetaking services There are many different reasons why students registered with Disability Services may be requesting a volunteer notetaker. Examples include: Students who are hard of hearing or deaf. Students with low vision or who are blind. Students with dexterity/motor skill difficulty. Students with learning disabilities. Students with ADD/ADHD. 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 4

5 Academic situations were a notetaker might be needed Class or lab lectures Class discussion Class guest speakers Class videos or films Class field trips or experiential learning 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 5

6 What are the benefits for the student receiving notes? Allows student to focus on the instructor. Provides student with accurate information. Increases student’s confidence- –Student knows that he/she is receiving accurate information. Gives student access to classroom information that may have otherwise been missed. Gives student the opportunity to participate in classroom discussion. Supplements the student’s notes and provides a tool for notetaking improvement. 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 6

7 What are the benefits for the volunteer notetaker? Volunteers will receive a stipend at the end of the semester. Volunteering is a valuable experience that students can include on their resumes. 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 7

8 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 8 Volunteer Notetaking Guidelines 1.Be on time. 2.Take notes for assigned student only. 3.Give notes to student after each class, or drop off notes (labeled with course and section number) at Disability Services (Alumni Hall, room 103 on the Toledo campus; Enrollment Services, room 112 on the Findlay campus.) 4.If unable to attend class, attempt to arrange for a replacement notetaker. 5.If replacement is not available, contact Disability Services at Amount of stipend will be prorated if student drops course. 7.Volunteers who do not fulfill notetaking commitments for semester may be not eligible for a stipend. 8.Students who have a volunteer notetaker understand that receiving notes is not a substitute for class attendance. When you sign and return the Volunteer Notetaker card, you are agreeing to the following guidelines:

9 Other important items to consider Volunteers must practice confidentiality and not share any information regarding the student that they are providing notes for. Volunteers must provide notes in a timely manner. Notes could be provided to a student after each class, or could be ed to a student. Volunteers may also leave notes at Disability Services or Enrollment Services on the Findlay campus. Students and volunteers should work out a method that is suitable for each party. Volunteers should do their best to provide the instructor’s information, views and opinions and should refrain from interjecting their own opinions in this information. Volunteers are not be expected to tutor, and are not obligated to provide notes to a student who is not attending class. Volunteers should follow up with Disability Services, if there are any questions/concerns. 5/11/20159Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training

10 Volunteer Notetaking Materials Volunteers may use free notetaking paper available at Disability Services or at Enrollment Services, room 112 on the Findlay campus. Volunteers may also use their own paper and make free copies of their notes at Disability Services or at the Mail/Copy Center, room 115CC on the Findlay Campus. 5/11/201510Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training

11 Strategies to assist you in taking more accurate, complete, and organized notes Use a ball point pen for notetaking. If using carbonless paper, do not stack paper on top of each other. Put a heading and a date on your notes for each class session. If possible, use a similar notetaking format throughout the semester. Leave margin space on the paper for the student to add his/her own comments later. Make sure your handwriting is legible. Correct spelling errors and make sure all abbreviations have been properly identified. 5/11/201511Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training

12 Notetaking Formats The following slides provide you with examples of notetaking formats you might wish to use. –Two-Column Format –Outline Format –Paragraph Format 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 12

13 Example of a Notetaking Format 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 13 Fold paper or use ruler to make dividing line. Take notes as usual in larger column. Fill in key points column with words or phrases to alert you. Two-Column Format

14 Example of a Notetaking Format 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 14 Label outline levels. Be consistent in your labeling. Each level can be one word or short phrase. Leave space for editing later. Outline Format

15 Examples of Notetaking Format 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 15 Each sentence should express a complete thought. Keep paragraphs short. Make sure important info is not buried in the text. Leave plenty of white space for editing notes. Paragraph Format

16 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 16 Other Strategies “Teacher Clues” Lecture Cues Right before a teacher presents important lecture points he/she may say something like, “it is really important to remember that…” or “you should remember that…” Teachers say these statements to let students know that the information that follows is really important stuff. Of course, the obvious lecture cue is “this will be on the test.”

17 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 17 Other Strategies “Teacher Clues” Notes of the Board (Or Overhead) If the teacher writes or spells words, write them down along with detailed information about the word. Usually, a teacher will spell new vocabulary or really important words. If the teacher places information on the board or overhead, it should be in your notes.

18 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 18 What to know if you are taking notes for a student who has a hearing loss. Get the student’s feedback on the quality of the notes. Face student and speak directly to him/her. Obtain the student’s attention by waving your hand or lightly tapping on student’s shoulder. Visit The National Technical Institute for the Deaf for further information on training of notetakers for a student with hearing loss.www.ntid.rit.edu/elearning

19 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 19 Completing Volunteer Notetaker Training Verify completion of your volunteer notetaker training by clicking on this address and place the following information exactly as stated in the subject line of the “Volunteer Notetaker Training Completed ________________________” (insert your first & last name here) Please leave the body of your blank

20 5/11/2015Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 20 Boyle, Joseph R. PhD. (2001). Enhancing the Note-Taking Skills of Students with Mild Disabilities Learning Disabilities OnLine. Retrieved September 8, 2003, from Boyle, Joseph R. (2001). Helping Students to Become Better Note-Takers Through Better Lectures Learning Disabilities OnLine. Retrieved September 8, 2003, from Boyle, Joseph R. & Weishaar, Mary Konya. (n.d.) Note-Taking for Students with Mild Disabilities: The Art of Note-Taking Family Education Network. Retrieved September 8, 2003, from University of Colorado at Boulder. (n.d.) Online Notetaker Training. Retrieved 04/17/2008, from University of Florida. (n.d.) Note-taker Training Disability Resource Center Retrieved 04/17/2008, from References

21 5/11/2015 Disability Services Volunteer Notetaker Training 21 Disability Services Contact Information: Contact Information Toledo Disability Services, Alumni Hall 103 Phone: (567) or GO OWENS, Ext Fax: (567) Findlay Phone: (567)


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