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John Aston For CIBSE Home Counties North West March 8, 2006 Approved Documents L2A and L2B The contribution of good lighting control.

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Presentation on theme: "John Aston For CIBSE Home Counties North West March 8, 2006 Approved Documents L2A and L2B The contribution of good lighting control."— Presentation transcript:

1 John Aston For CIBSE Home Counties North West March 8, 2006 Approved Documents L2A and L2B The contribution of good lighting control

2 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 2 Contents A little bit about the Approved Document L Rather more about lighting controls Some other legislation and norms to think about Plus bonus feature: Commissioning Code L

3 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 3 Approved Document L2A New buildings other than dwellings Not less than 45 luminaire- lumens/circuit-watt average for office, industrial and storage areas In other spaces initial lamp + ballast efficacy of not less than 50 lamp lumens/circuit-watt Local switching – now within 6 metres or twice the height of the light (whichever is larger) No ‘controls factor’ – the calculation tool for the Building CO 2 Emission Rate (BER) accounts for their impact The 500W exemption has gone

4 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 4 Pretty much the same as ADL2A, except: –The ‘control factors’ are retained Approved Document L2B Work in existing buildings that are not dwellings Control functionFactor In a day lit space and controlled by photoelectric switch or dimming 0.90 In a space that is unoccupied for a significant time and a sensor switches lighting OFF, but ON is manual 0.90 Combining the above 0.85 None of the above1.00

5 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 5 Local switching – the changes for 2006 Maximum distance from switch to light: 6m or 2 x mounting height 2 Consider switching perimeter luminaires in day lit areas separately

6 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 6 Summarising the intent of ADL2A & ADL2B Improve the energy efficiency of non-domestic building by 25% Provide a measure that is non-prescriptive in order to allow better design Cover both new construction AND significant refurbishments (100m 2 +) Meet the target CO 2 emissions – now and during life Allow compliance through certification – based on delivering the design intended and commissioned accordingly

7 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 7 Lighting controls are already widely used and accepted There are 1,000’s of lighting control installations in the UK Specified today on most new commercial developments Used in offices, public buildings, education premises, shopping malls and retail developments

8 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 8 Energy saving..or having the right light in the right place but only when it is needed!

9 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 9 Time control Energy saving All of these control functions can reduce costs Examples include: -limiting light pre- and post-trading in retail applications -changing the mode of operation -parts of education buildings

10 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 10 Time control Daylight and controlled luminance Energy saving All of these control functions can reduce costs Integrating daylight -best practice uses dimming control -use care when switching

11 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 11 Time control Daylight and controlled luminance Occupancy Energy saving All of these control functions can reduce costs Matching lighting in use to the numbers of people present -all current products rely on ‘movement’ -use care when applying

12 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 12 Time control Daylight and controlled luminance Occupancy Wall switch IR / RF wireless operation Telephone override PC link (TCP/IP) Energy saving All of these control functions can reduce costs Used in combination with all the automatic functions to achieve: -manual ON -auto OFF = better energy savings!* * Ref: Moore TA, Carter DJ, Slater AI: Long-term patterns of use of occupant controlled office lighting

13 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 13 Time control Daylight and controlled luminance Occupancy Wall switch IR / RF wireless operation Telephone override PC link (TCP/IP) Logging and measuring Energy saving All of these control functions can reduce costs If you don’t know how much you are using – you won’t know how much you are saving.

14 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 14 Energy saving Lighting is still a significant element of a building’s electricity cost – 40% is easily possible. Take an unusual ‘case study’ – from 10 years ago: Energy Saving each year through: –dimming on the Sales Floor: £3, approx. –control in stock rooms etc: £ plus

15 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 15 Additional standards and regulations  EN Indoor Lighting  CIBSE Lighting Guides 3, 7 and…. Comfort  The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992  EN50172 and others Safety

16 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 16 Controls and EN let’s take a typical modern, flexible use, office interior….

17 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 17 Controls and EN12464 Light the task area Make sure the ‘surround area’ is correctly lit Maintain 200 lux in the ‘occupied space’ …and keep the 200 lux if someone leaves..zoom in – and look at some of the control issues….

18 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 18 Controls and EN zoom out – and look at some more of the control issues…. Maintain safe circulation lighting Provide ‘scene setting’ Control the light levels Take account of daylight Provide local control

19 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 19 Safety and convenience..and the emergency lighting needs testing and monitoring. Emergency light Exit signs

20 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 20 So what’s the secret of success? Understand the needs of the client and the staff Draw up a specification that defines the required functionality and performance. List your preferred suppliers – based on your knowledge of their abilities. Make sure there is a full method statement for the lighting installation. Looking at some of this in more detail…..

21 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 21 Understanding the application Type of spaceExamples OwnedCell office, small workshop, consulting room SharedOpen plan office, production area, ward Temporarily ownedMeeting room, ‘hot’ office, classroom Occasionally visitedStore room, book-stack, toilet Un-ownedCorridor (open or closed), stairs ManagedHotel lounge, museum, foyer, terminal …and each ‘day lit’ or not and ‘high or low occupancy’ leading to the appropriate selection of controls. Let’s look at some…

22 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL The elements of a multi-sensor - 1 The light sensor –the sensor looks at a square area approx 3m x 3m. –Photo sensor with built-in colour correction filter for visible radiation (more closely matching the eye) –Excellent linearity (better control) –No cadmium (sustainability) –Separate sensor unaffected by other elements or stray light ingress (no compromise)

23 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL The elements of a multi-sensor - 2 Infra-red receiver –RC5 coded solution –includes ‘self calibration’ function as well Push-button –provides convenient ‘set-up’ facility to self-calibrate the light sensor (when an IR controller is unavailable)

24 58 Coded infra red = greater flexibility The ‘room flooding’ approach to IR control Allows multiple transmitters and receivers in an area 7 groups and 5 channels Pre-set and scene setting capability Interface for pushbutton control also available.

25 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 25 Normal IR control…. …each IR transmitter could offer ON, OFF and dimming

26 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 26 ….using RC5 code to give personal light control… each personal IR controller operates selected lights room controller can set- scenes and manage all lights in the room

27 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL The elements of a multi-sensor - 3 Movement sensor –An integrated solution that gives improved sensitivity –A 120° shade is added to allow masking of part of the detection area –The walk test LED shines through the sensor surround –Available in ‘Presence Detector’ only version –Rectangular detection pattern

28 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL Movement detection area Sensor mounted at 2.5m orientation Sensitivity increases towards the centre

29 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL Movement detection area - 120° shade deployed Sensor mounted at 2.5m Shaded area shows maximum screen cover

30 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 30 So – How do we comply with all of this? Commissioning as a solution Even a quick review of the process from concept to completion gives these obvious results: –There needs to be a connection between the concept and the reality –Everyone needs to know their role and responsibility …which is why ‘commissioning’ became the subject of a new Code!

31 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 31 Why do we need another ‘Code’? Unfortunately the guides, standards, regulations and European Norms already exist – and those responsible for verification need help. Particularly those seeking to meet ADL2A and B!..which is why the Code received substantial Government support.

32 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 32 Use the CIBSE Commissioning Code L: 2003 Effective Commissioning enables and/or ensures: –compliance with Building Regulations Approved Document L2 –compliance with all other relevant regulations / legislation –the design intent is met Leading to: –better lighting standards –more productive and satisfied occupants –added competitiveness for the building owner

33 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 33 Use the CIBSE Commissioning Code L: 2003 Scope and some of the tools provided Covers lamps, gear, luminaires, controls, commissioning and installation issues. Includes –Definitions –Examples –Checklists Example method statement for lighting system including automatic controls Sample completion certificates Safety matters Notes about the design of lighting and lighting control systems

34 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 34 Approved Documents L1 and L2 Declaration of conformity Requires a ‘qualified’ person to sign –Designer and/or manufacturer Applies to Parts L1 and L2 Gives evidence of compliance : –Type of equipment installed –Works identification –Method of verifying achievement –Declaration signatures Covers scheme design and/or installation Effectively ‘self-certification’ Stop press: ECA and NIC/EIC to run training courses from April 2006

35 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 35 The benefits of effective commissioning … a concluding summary Lighting system components are verified as those specified Substitution can only be done with the agreement of the lighting designer The design intent is actually delivered Legal and standards obligations are met A benchmark is set for future reference

36 Lighting Controls, John Aston, March 8, 2006, CIBSE – ADL2 36 Final conclusion: Lighting controls help us to meet ADL2A & B Or to put it another way….. …I said “an Aston” – not “an Austin”….. The revised 2006 documents confirm the importance of effectively controlled lighting in reducing carbon emissions. And the Declaration of Conformity has real additional benefits for the lighting installation!

37 Home Counties North West


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