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Developed by KS Design Team Facilitation by Towers & Watson

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1 Developed by KS Design Team Facilitation by Towers & Watson
Kamehameha Schools Professional Development Strategic Framework Strategy, Guiding Principles and Professional Development Framework Details Developed by KS Design Team Facilitation by Towers & Watson November 2010

2 Topics Background Professional Development Strategy Guiding Principles
Additional Detail on Guiding Principles Professional Development Employee Groupings Definitions of Key Priority Areas Definitions of Key Developmental and Experiential Learning Experiences Governance Recommendations Professional Development Activities & Timelines Appendix Revised Professional Development Framework Details ADDIE Process Map KS Standardized Training Format

3 Background The Kamehameha Schools (KS) Design Team contracted Towers Watson to facilitate the development of a professional development framework for Kamehameha Schools. The proposed framework was then expanded to encompass professional development perspectives and elements which all contribute to supporting the strategic priorities of the organization. The resultant framework provides both organizational (e.g., KS Competencies, Nohona Hawaii, Technology), role specific (i.e., general staff training, managers, leaders), and group specific (i.e., Education, Endowment, etc.) pathways for training and development needs. KS’ aim is to create an Professional Development framework that is geared toward the coaching and development of staff to best reach our strategic goals, mission, and the Lähui Hawaiÿi thereby driving organizational success. The framework is likely to go through multiple generations of updates from this initial development. Initially the framework should confirm the core curricula and experiential offerings in each role – shape the framework, messaging, and process for use, including an annual operational cycle of review, update and communication. Second generation is to tie the career ladders and integrate with reward, recognition and performance management processes, including the ability to develop more specific individual development plans.

4 Professional Development Strategy
KS’s Professional Development Strategy is to execute an organization-wide Professional Development framework that is deeply embedded in the strategic needs of KS and drives organizational success for the betterment of the Lähui Hawaiÿi

5 Guiding Principles Mission Aligned: Professional Development offerings will be geared towards equipping/enabling staff capacity with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to best serve our mission, beneficiaries, and the Lähui Hawaiÿi. Shared Kuleana: KS is committed to providing Professional Development as a key part of KS’ total rewards program while recognizing that Professional Development is a shared kuleana between KS and the employee. KS provides the opportunity for Professional Development; while the employees’ kuleana is to pursue and apply those development opportunities to further the mission of Kamehameha Schools. Organization-wide: Professional Development will focus on three groups: Staff Managers Leaders (i.e., Director, CEO Team) Multiple Measures: KS will follow a multi-tiered/multi-metric approach to measure effectiveness of Professional Development. This may include climate survey results, participation numbers, evaluation surveys, etc. Holistic: KS takes a holistic view of Professional Development that includes: Key priority areas (e.g., KS Organizational Competencies, KS Leadership Competencies, etc.). Various experiential and developmental earning experiences. Shared Administration: Organization wide Professional Development is coordinated by HR and focuses on organization wide issues; while group/function-specific Professional Development is coordinated by each group and focuses on functional area or competencies. HR’s kuleana is to steward the governance of the Professional Development framework using the developed guiding principles and coordinate organization-wide and group specific/functional offerings.

6 Additional Detail on Guiding Principles
The following sections provide additional details on these guiding principles and administrative/governance issues: Development to target three distinct staff groups Definitions of key priority areas Definitions of key developmental and experiential learning experiences Governance recommendations

7 Professional Development Classification
Classification (Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes) Steward Organization Wide Development HR Core Required Training (Violence in the Workplace, Sexual Harassment, etc.) KS Organizational Competencies KS Leadership Competencies Topics of Opportunity Group Specific Development Group Education Endowment Support Ka Pi’ina Educational Leadership Kula Hawaii Moenaha 5 Values Policies and Procedures Fiscal Officer Project Mgmt Communication Rosemary’s comments: Slide # 7 – it would be helpful if there was a description of what these classifications mean. For instance, I could describe – org wide productivity suite training (MS Office) as Org-wide and not IT User based. Plus it is not clear where you differentiate IT technical skills training – in Group Specific? Though the example there for project management under Support – could be org-wide. Finally, for the IT User Development classification – can you change that to IT End User Development? That is if I am interpreting correctly, that it contains training that may not be org-wide but on various end users (i.e. Sharepoint Admin training, SMS training, Peoplesoft training, etc…) please remove KS Desktop Apps – as that is mis-leading. Perhaps a conversation may help clarify this, but in the end, please clarify in the presentation. IT End User Development ITD KS Desktop Apps Phones SharePoint Hawaiian Cultural Commitment Development Ho`okahua Olelo Hawai’i Ike Hawai’i Nohona Hawai’i

8 Competencies are at the Core of KS’ people programs…
Presentation Title 8 Competencies are at the Core of KS’ people programs… Rewards and Recognition: Individual rewards and recognition are based on consistent and progressive demonstration of both organizational and functional competencies. Competencies will help determine the key knowledge, skills, and attitudes to focus on when developing the next generation of Kamehameha Schools’ leaders Rewards and Recognition Succession Planning Managers can use competencies as a starting point for coaching employees on areas of strengths and areas for further growth, referencing the Professional Development Framework for developmental opportunities Competencies can help managers and employees in determining career paths Interview questions gauge a candidate’s skills and behaviors as they relate to Kamehameha Schools’ competencies Competencies will help provide direction and set expectations during employee’s career with Kamehameha Schools Recruitment and Retention Career Development Competency Model Saturday, April 15, 2017 Career Ladders Performance Management Career ladders help employees understand future career opportunities in a given area, as they develop their technical skills as well as their competencies Competencies help managers provide feedback to employees consistent with KS’s strategic aims Managers can gauge employee development from year to year

9 …and the Professional Development is a representation of how staff develop in their career(s)…
We have structured the offerings into the following key layers of the organization as follows: Refer to the following slides for further details Rewards and Recognition Career Ladders (selected units) Performance Management Development Succession Planning Recruitment Retention Competency Model Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies Core Requirements Group Specific Requirements Leadership Competencies 9

10 Professional Development Targets Three Staff Groups
For the purposes of the Professional Development framework, we have structured the majority of offerings into the following three staff groups in the organization: Staff Managers (supervisors) Leaders (Directors, CEO Team) For compliance/regulatory-related training requirements we have included: General Staff Training (including long-term temps, staff augmentation) Managers As the framework matures and evolves, KS may consider additional offerings targeted to individuals that consistently perform at highly effective levels (via organization competencies) and/or accomplish goals and assignments. In addition, such individuals may be identified as consistent contributors that demonstrate: capabilities in the functional requirements or roles of their area; the personal motivation and drive to excel now and in the future; and the behaviors that lead to the delivery of results.

11 Definitions of Key Priority Areas
KS Organizational Competencies (i.e., accountability, communication, collaboration and teamwork, change effectiveness, Hawaiian cultural commitment, innovation) Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance, and enhanced contribution. Group Specific: Components of the Professional Development framework specific to a group or functional areas; these will need to be developed by that specific group like Endowment Group’s PD model and what the Education Group is developing via Ka Pi’ina Core Requirements (i.e., new hire orientation, performance management, code of conduct/ethics, technology, computer privacy and security, etc.) Critical baseline training that is mandatory for all KS employees KS Leadership competencies (i.e., accountability, team management, communication & influence, managing change, problem solving & decision making) Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to accomplishing KS’s strategic goals

12 Governance Recommendations
Identify organization-wide enablers Organization Wide Focus HR through the Professional Development Framework and the CEO Team HR on behalf of CEO Team identifies and prioritize needs and issues, including mandatory, compliance related matters. Professional Development framework process is identified as the enabling mechanism. HR manages content with functional input to ensure relevance and consistency. Each functional group has a “sponsor” to help localize; weigh if priority for them or “tested out” AND Education Group Executives (EGE), Campus Executive Council (Tri-Campus) or the senior executive of group (e.g., Headmaster, Vice President, Division Director, Program Director) Group Specific Focused

13 Professional Development Activities and Timeline
Presentation Title Saturday, April 15, 2017 Professional Development Activities and Timeline Prof Dev Organization Education Unit OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JUL AUG SEP 1st Quarter Milestones  Obtain and review final Towers Watson draft of the Strategic Professional Development Framework 2nd Quarter Milestones  10/18/2010 – HRLT Approval with Modification for Larger Framework and Construct 10/25/10 – VP of Admin Approval 11/6/2010 – Develop consistent training templates Prepare deck for Senior Leader sharing 11/12/10 12/9/10 – Share with HRELT and CPT 3rd Quarter Milestones  2/21/2011 – First draft of the Professional Development Calendar completed; 1/13/2011 & 2/23/2011 – Iterative update and design via meetings with the POCs; 3/31/2011 – Finalize KS Organization Wide PD Calendar 3/31/2011 – Finalize budget 4th Quarter Milestones  4/30/2011 – Develop communication of PD events and activities; 5/31/ Implement (or reaffirm) offerings by 5/31/2011 6/30/2011– Prepare to launch communication of PD events and activities 7/15/2011 – Launch communication of PD events and activities for Mtg on lessons learned on or before 9/30 Calendar Timeline Budget Communication Plan Deliverables for Org Wide Prof Develop: KS Strategic PD Framework Development Approach-ADDIE Templates for training Library of all training List of PD Points of Contact (POC) 2nd Quarter Milestones  10/29/2010 – Determine Education Group training construct for education management, education leadership, Danielson training, rubric, etc. 11/5/2010 – Coordinate use of consistent training development templates 11/12/2010 – Share with Senior Leaders 3rd Quarter Milestones  1/31/2011 – First draft of the Professional Development Calendar completed; 2/1/2011 to 3/31/2011 – Iterative update and design; 3/31/2011 – Finalize Education Group Segment 3/31/2011 – Finalize budget Deliverables for Education Prof Develop:

14 Me ka mahalo (with thanks)
The Workforce Investment Group (WIG) in HR wishes to thank the following Kamehameha Schools (KS) Design Team members or the time and effort invested to develop this organizational framework: Phyllis J Unebasami, Director, Literacy Inst & Supp Ann R Botticelli, VP, CR&C Dean K Tomita, Acting Director, ITD Vanda L Hampp, Operations Manager, Endowment Ed Otani, Professional Development Coordinator, Campus Strategies Rosemary Peh, Chief IT Architect, ITD Liuone A Faagai, WIG Leader, HR BJ Mau, Project Manager Partner, HR Alt Kagesa, Performance & Development Partner, HR Melehina Groves, Cultural Development Spec, Ho’okahua Sylvia Hussy, VP, Administration Group In addition, WIG wishes to thank the following Towers Watson contractors as well who facilitated these key conversations: Julie Womack; Director, Towers & Watson Julie Jasica, Senior Consultant, Towers & Watson Bill Greene, Senior Consultant, Towers & Watson Deepti Singh - Consultant Julie Womack - Director Julie Jasica - Senior Consultant Bill Greene - Senior Consultant Deepti Singh - Consultant

15 Kou mana`o?

16 APPENDIX Revised Professional Development Framework Details
ADDIE Process Map KS Standardized Training Format

17 Definitions of Key Developmental and Experiential Learning Experiences
On-the-Job Training: Involves real life job assignments and projects being used as the learning method Shadowing: Involves getting exposure to another area/person for a temporary period of time, to learn by seeing/watching/doing Reflection/Debriefing: Involves a conversation between a supervisor and employee or in-tact team to talk about the learning experience, what was the take-away, and how the individual/team intends to apply the learning within the context of the job or team Action Learning: Learning method where individuals participate in small teams to work on a challenging business issue and share learning/recommendations Books: Hard copies are available through the KS Resource Center, where indicated KS Course: These include courses that are offered by KS through classroom interventions with an instructor in which participants interact face-to-face E-Learning: Computer enhanced training delivered via personal computer or other communications technologies Note: There is a cost associated with these courses ($250 – $5,00, depending on the course) External Training: Classroom interventions available outside of KS with an instructor in which participants interact face-to-face Note: There is a cost associated with these courses ($500 – $2,000, depending on the course). The courses vary in length, may be off-site and may have specific participant requirements

18 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Accountability
Staff Managers Leadership Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Accountability – Takes responsibility for decision making and accomplishing objectives Takes initiative to accomplish tasks and make decisions, using the appropriate resources Demonstrates a strong sense of commitment and timeliness in executing on goals and solving problems, while ensuring quality Recognizes linkages between actions and the organizational vision (i.e., line of sight) and uses this knowledge when making decisions On-the-Job Training: Volunteer to work on a project with a challenging timeline, from start to finish Organize fun and simple activities within your department or group that gives colleagues a chance to engage in team building or Nohona Hawai‘i activities. Manage a project with a challenging timeline, from start to finish Analyze current conditions/ environment and list-out potential opportunities for process improvements. Then initiate a plan of action to make one or more process improvements Lead a project to make one or more process improvements Role model a “thought of the day” or “word of the day” at staff meetings that encourages staff to learn and share more about ‘Ike or Nohona Hawai‘i Shadowing: Identify a peer you or others consider to be accountable. Talk with him/her to understand the process he/she goes through to handle various situations. Try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Identify a leader you or others consider to be accountable. Follow him/her over the course of a project and note how he/she executes the project. Try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Identify a peer you or others consider to be accountable. Request to follow him/her over the course of a project and note how he/she executes the project. Try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment

19 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Accountability (cont’d)
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Accountability – Takes responsibility for decision making and accomplishing objectives Takes initiative to accomplish tasks and make decisions, using the appropriate resources Demonstrates a strong sense of commitment and timeliness in executing on goals and solving problems, while ensuring quality Recognizes linkages between actions and the organizational vision (i.e., line of sight) and uses this knowledge when making decisions Reflection/Debriefing: Identify the obstacles you face in achieving your goals. Develop a set of action items that will help you overcome these obstacles and discuss them with your manager to get feedback Identify the obstacles you faced while working on a particularly difficult assignment. Develop a set of action items that will help you overcome these obstacles in the future and discuss them with your manager or peers to get feedback Identify a peer that is also reading a book or attending a course on accountability and setup a time to meet and debrief on key learnings and perspectives and what changes you might make Action Learning: Review what you learned in the “Accountability” with Alt Kagesa training and share key learnings/perspectives with a group/team you are a part of; also share how you can apply these learnings within your own group/team/ area of work Develop a plan of action to monitor progress against goals. Share your plan/ideas with your manager and/or peers and solicit feedback Teaching/training own or other groups Review past organizational decisions that have worked well and some that have not and develop some rules of thumb to use in future decision making processes (distinguish bad decisions from bad outcomes). Make sure that you review the following three categories of decisions: those that needed to be made with incomplete information, those that were made under a time constraint, and those that impacted others. Work through this with a team of leaders or hare your learnings with a peer Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

20 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Accountability (cont’d)
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Accountability – Takes responsibility for decision making and accomplishing objectives Takes initiative to accomplish tasks and make decisions, using the appropriate resources Demonstrates a strong sense of commitment and timeliness in executing on goals and solving problems, while ensuring quality Recognizes linkages between actions and the organizational vision (i.e., line of sight) and uses this knowledge when making decisions Books: “Sticking to It: The Art of Adherence” by Lee Colan; available at KS Resource Center “Now Discover Your Strengths” - Marcus Buckingham “Leadership Is An Art” – Max Dupree “Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done” by Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, and Charles Burck; available at KS Resource Center KS Course: “Performance Management for STAFF” with Alt Kagesa “Accountability - “Paulele” with Kaala Souza “Performance Management for SUPERVISORS” with Alt Kagesa “Setting Clear Expectations and Holding Folks Accountable” with Alt Kagesa N/A E-Learning: “Goal Setting In The Workplace;” online course available through KS “Performance Appraisals: Strategies for Success” (self-study course offered by American Management Association) ”Maximizing Employee Performance;” online course available through KS Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

21 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Accountability (cont’d)
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Accountability – Takes responsibility for decision making and accomplishing objectives Takes initiative to accomplish tasks and make decisions, using the appropriate resources Demonstrates a strong sense of commitment and timeliness in executing on goals and solving problems, while ensuring quality Recognizes linkages between actions and the organizational vision (i.e., line of sight) and uses this knowledge when making decisions External Training: IS 105B: Self Awareness and Decision Making: University of Hawai`i, Hawai`i Community College (Undergraduate Course) MGMT 2500: Supervisory Leadership: Hawai‘i Pacific University (Undergraduate Course) MGT 120: Principles of Management: University of Hawai‘i, Windward Community College (Undergraduate Course) Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

22 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Change Effectiveness
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Change Effectiveness – Readily adjusts to and embraces changes to meet organizational needs and/or conditions Demonstrates openness and willingness to change; adjusts in ambiguous situations where conditions change, or information available is incomplete Enables change through the development and execution of change strategy and processes On-the-Job Training: Serve as a team member to help implement change in your area Seek opportunities to talk with others, or communicate in writing, about a change and its benefits Identify individuals who are expressing resistance to the change and/or spreading negative information about the change. Ask them questions to understand their perspective and troubleshoot ways to address their needs Coach others on how to lead a change management initiative Shadowing: Observe others at KS who identify opportunities for change and manage the change process effectively. Identify strategies you can use in your own area Request to follow a leader at KS, for a period of time, who is implementing a change process. Identify strategies you can use in your own area Request to meet regularly with a peer for a period of time, who is implementing a change process. Identify strategies you can use in your own area Reflection/Debriefing: Meet with your supervisor to share key concepts/learnings from the “Change Management” with Alt Kagesa training and how they specifically apply to your own area Solicit feedback from others at KS on how change has positively or negatively affected them or impacted their team; get ideas on how to make change work in your own area/team Assess your own actions during past changes. Evaluate what you did successfully (or not) to manage the change. Debrief with a peer to solicit feedback Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

23 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Change Effectiveness (cont’d) Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Change Effectiveness – Readily adjusts to and embraces changes to meet organizational needs and/or conditions Demonstrates openness and willingness to change; adjusts in ambiguous situations where conditions change, or information available is incomplete Enables change through the development and execution of change strategy and processes Action Learning: Assess your own actions during past changes. Evaluate what you did successfully to manage the change and where you could make improvements; share with your peer or manager to get their input and ideas Ask Directors/Executives about a changing situation to fully understand the rationale and benefits for change; speak with them about what you can do to enable the change in your area Teaching/training own or other groups on change Rotate people to different job functions to give them a broader perspective; invite them to share with you and your team what their key learnings are and what they need from you and others to be successful in these rotational assignments Books: “Who Moved My Cheese” by Spencer Johnson; available at KS Resource Center “Play To Win” by Larry Wilson; available at KS Resource Center “Leading Change” by John P. Kotter; available at KS Resource Center KS Course: “Change Management” with Alt Kagesa KS Course “How to Lead and Communicate Change” with Alt Kagesa N/A E-Learning: “The Power To Change,” online course available through KS “Proaction: Change, Innovation & Opportunity;” online course available through KS Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

24 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Change Effectiveness (cont’d) Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Change Effectiveness – Readily adjusts to and embraces changes to meet organizational needs and/or conditions Demonstrates openness and willingness to change; adjusts in ambiguous situations where conditions change, or information available is incomplete Enables change through the development and execution of change strategy and processes External Training: MGMT 3440: Organizational Change and Development: Hawai`i Pacific University (Undergraduate Course) PSOC 6440: Organizational Change and Development: Hawai`i Pacific University (Graduate Course) Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

25 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Collaboration and Teamwork
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Collaboration and Teamwork – Works cooperatively and collaboratively with others throughout the organization in alignment with the organization's objectives Collaborates with others to build effective relationships, showing respect for individual differences Functions as an effective team member and contributes to group and organizational effectiveness Maintains awareness of own strengths and weaknesses and acquires and/or develops team members with the necessary skills to fill the gaps On-the-Job Training: When on a team, volunteer to take on tasks, projects or leadership roles – don’t wait to be assigned. Offer to partner with another team member if you are not comfortable handling the entire task When assembling teams, ensure a mix of talent, including individuals who are more junior and more senior Ask employees in different positions and functions for feedback or opinions about a work related process. Consciously select an individual in a position lower than yours and a position higher than yours. Use input to plan for process improvement Lead a cross-functional team as part of a project Shadowing: Observe how effective leaders lead their teams and ask them why they did what they did and you can specifically do to contribute Identify a Director/Executive who is well networked around the KS and works well with others. Observe what this individual says and does. Observe interactions between this individual and individuals who you believe are less skilled than him/her. How does this individual act? What does he/she say or do? What might you consider adding to your own approach? Identify a peer who is well networked around the KS and works well with others. Observe what this individual says and does. Observe interactions between this individual and individuals who you believe are less skilled than him/her. How does this individual act? What does he/she say or do? What might you consider adding to your own approach? Reflection/Debriefing: Meet with you people manager to debrief on key concepts and learning as they relate to the “How to be and Effective Team Member” by Ray Ohta training Meet with peers to discuss key learnings from “How to Lead Teams” by Ray Ohta and how these may be applied in day-to-day situations Identify a peer that is also reading a book or attending a course on collaboration and teamwork and setup a time to meet and debrief on key learnings and perspectives with your direct report group Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

26 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Collaboration and Teamwork (cont’d) Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Collaboration and Teamwork – Works cooperatively and collaboratively with others throughout the organization in alignment with the organization's objectives Collaborates with others to build effective relationships, showing respect for individual differences Functions as an effective team member and contributes to group and organizational effectiveness Maintains awareness of own strengths and weaknesses and acquires and/or develops team members with the necessary skills to fill the gaps Action Learning: Seek out feedback on your role within the team. In addition, initiate briefing sessions regularly with team members to discuss team strengths or areas of opportunity Bring together key individuals from different areas or departments and facilitate a process to address mutual business concerns Teaching/training own or other groups Review your more formal work relationships throughout the organization with an eye on assessing the quality and strength of your connections with people who you rely on to get things done. Make a special effort with these people to show a personal interest and to informally share personal information about you; solicit input/feedback from them relative to your relationship and how to strengthen it Books: “Coyote Power — Team Building, Courage and Adaptability Skills Motivational Training Seminar” with Joel Weldon “The First-Time Manager's Guide to Team Building” with Gary Topchik “The Five Dysfunctions of Team” with Patrick M. Lencioni; available at KS Resource Center KS Course: “How to be an Effective Team Member” with Ray Ohta “Becoming ONE: The Pursuit of Lökahi in the Workplace” = Teamwork with Ka’ala Souza “How to Lead Teams” with Ray Ohta “Learning to Lead Collaboratively” with Donna Ching N/A E-Learning: “Participating in High Performance Teams;” online course available through KS “Handling Conflict;” online course available through KS “Making Teams Work;” Self-study course offered by American Management Association

27 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Collaboration and Teamwork (cont’d) Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Collaboration and Teamwork – Works cooperatively and collaboratively with others throughout the organization in alignment with the organization's objectives Collaborates with others to build effective relationships, showing respect for individual differences Functions as an effective team member and contributes to group and organizational effectiveness Maintains awareness of own strengths and weaknesses and acquires and/or develops team members with the necessary skills to fill the gaps External Training: COM 3350: Team Building: Hawai`i Pacific University (Undergraduate Course) MGT 122: Human Relations in Business: University of Hawai`i, Leeward Community College (Undergraduate Course) Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) BIOM 651: PhD Team Building Seminar: University of Hawai‘i, Mânoa (Graduate Course) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

28 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Communication
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Communication – Interacts effectively and persuasively with others in the workplace to solicit and share both written and verbal information, and generate commitment Creates succinct written and verbal material to clearly articulate point of view to the appropriate audiences Utilizes active listening skills to ensure understanding Utilizes a variety of communication and facilitation techniques to convey information persuasively and generate commitment where necessary On-the-Job Training: Work on a presentation that is particularly challenging to communicate Be familiar with the various media of communication at your disposal and identify which medium works best for what types of communications. Use a variety of media to engage the audience if you are making a formal presentation Lead an organization-wide communication effort Shadowing: Identify a couple of outstanding speakers in KS. Observe how he/she talks in formal and informal settings. Take note of the techniques he/she employs to interact with and engage the audience. Consider how you can apply the technique he/she used in your own communication Identify a peer who is viewed as an outstanding speakers in KS. Observe how he/she talks in formal and informal settings. Take note of the techniques he/she employs to interact with and engage the audience. Consider how you can apply the technique he/she used in your own communication Reflection/Debriefing: Think about a time when you were able to very effectively communicate a new idea to others. Write down what you did that you believe contributed to your success. Also, think about a time when you had difficulty getting your message across. Write down what you think you did that decreased the effectiveness of the event. Finally, compare your lists and try to determine the manner, style, and context in which you communicate best and worst. Share with your manager and ask for input and support Read “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” by Steven Covey. In particular habit five – see first to understand then to be understood. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with a peer Read “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” by Steven Covey. In particular habit five – see first to understand then to be understood. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with your direct report group. Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

29 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Communication (cont’d)
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Communication – Interacts effectively and persuasively with others in the workplace to solicit and share both written and verbal information, and generate commitment Creates succinct written and verbal material to clearly articulate point of view to the appropriate audiences Utilizes active listening skills to ensure understanding Utilizes a variety of communication and facilitation techniques to convey information persuasively and generate commitment where necessary Action Learning: Ask a peer or manager to identify a section of a meeting for you to practice listening and note-taking. Afterward, ask him/her to discuss or quiz you on what you heard and to give you feedback on your notes Video record a rehearsal of a presentation if the presentation is an important one; review the video recording and identify possible strengths and areas of refinement with a peer or manager Teaching/training own or other groups To improve informal communication, hold monthly meetings with a large Q&A component. Solicit feedback from participants on ways to make the monthly meetings more relevant/meaningful and modify accordingly Books: “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” by Steven Covey “”Fierce Conversations” – Scott “”FAST Feedback” - Tulgan ““The Articulate Executive in Action: How the Best Leaders Get Things Done” by Granville Toogood “Leading Out Loud: Inspiring Change Through Authentic Communications” by Terry Pearce KS Course: “How to Give a Presentation Tomorrow and Sleep Well Tonight” with Pam Chambers Two-part “Business Writing” with Pam Chambers “How to Give Feedback” with Alt Kagesa “Coaching & Communicating” with Ray Ohta “Raising the Bar with Constructive Feedback” with Pam Chambers N/A E-Learning: “Effective Business Writing;” online course available through KS “Interpersonal Communication;” online course available through KS “Are You Really Listening?;” online course available through KS External Training: ENG 209: Business Writing: University of Hawai`i, Leeward Community College SP 251: Principles of Effective Public Speaking: University of Hawai`i, Leeward Community College Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) COM 6200: Organizational Communication: Hawai’i Pacific University Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

30 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Hawaiian Cultural Commitment Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Hawaiian Cultural Commitment – Demonstrates cultural commitment by learning, promoting, and modeling, ‘Ike and Nohona Hawai‘i On-the-Job Training: Incorporate Hawaiian language into your greetings and leave-takings, including and phone conversations Begin staff meetings with pule. Include a “thought of the day” or “word of the day” at staff meetings that encourages staff to learn and share more about ‘Ike or Nohona Hawai’i Shadowing: Identify someone who embodies the Hawaiian culture. Take note of how they incorporate the culture into their daily tasks and routines. Identify techniques that would work for you and incorporate them into your daily life Identify a peer or organization leader that does a good job of promoting the Hawaiian culture among their staff. Take note of specific things that are done to encourage and reward Nohona Hawai‘i. Incorporate these learnings into daily routines Identify a leader inside or outside of the organization who embodies the Hawaiian culture. Arrange for this leader to share with the organization his/her knowledge, philosophies, etc. Reflection/Debriefing: Take advantage of resources offered online, on television and through various other media to further your knowledge of ‘ike and olelo Hawai’i. Note key learnings and debrief with a peer Participate in Hawaiian Culture workshops and fieldtrips. Reflect on how the workshops/fieldtrips impact the mission, values and daily life at KS. Share these reflections with peers and the organization Develop and conduct a workshop for the organization, based on personal expertise in Hawaiian culture Action Learning: Learn and memorize a new Hawaiian word or phrase each week. Learn the names of the days of the week in Hawaiian, the nights of the moon or the Hawaiian names of the calendar months. Practice and share with coworkers Identify someone in your division or department who speaks or has an interest in learning Hawaiian language and engage that person on a regular basis to practice conversation skills Teaching/training own or other groups Allow for participation in Cultural Staff Development offerings that occur throughout the year. Set time aside for fun and simple activities throughout the organization that give employees a chance to engage in Nohona Hawai‘i activities

31 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Hawaiian Cultural Commitment (cont’d) Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Hawaiian Cultural Commitment – Demonstrates cultural commitment by learning, promoting, and modeling, ‘Ike and Nohona Hawai‘i Books: “Hawaiian-English Dictionary” by Mary Kawena Pukui and Samuel Elbert “Olelo No’eau: Hawaiian Proverbs and Poetical Sayings” by Mary Kawena Pukui “Nana I Ke Kumu,” Vol I & II “Tales and Traditions of the People of Old: Na Moolelo a ka Poe Kahiko” by Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau “The Works of the People of Old: Na Hana a Ka Poe Kahiko” by Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau “Ka Poe Kahiko: The People of Old” by Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau “Fragments of Hawaiian History” by John Papa ‘I’I “Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism” by Noenoe Silva “Pauahi: The Kamehameha Legacy” by Dr George Hu’eu Sanford Kanahele KS Course: Workplace ‘Olelo I, II, III Maunaala Royal Residences: ‘Iolani Palace, Washington Place Kaniakapupu & Hanaiakamalama “Down KS Memory Lane” with Janet Zisk Paepae o He’eia Hui Ku Maoli Ola Ai Pono Sumida Watercress Helumoa I Ali’I Ke Ali’i N/A E-Learning: A virtual Hawaiian Cultural Center featuring articles, videos, profiles & essays On-line Hawaiian language classes and educational materials on the Hawaiian language Video catalog of Hawaiian documentary and educational videos Collection of historic Hawaiian language newspapers Hawaiian electronic library featuring digital versions of a wide variety of resources on ‘Ike and Olelo Hawai‘i Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

32 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Innovation
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Innovation – Identifies and integrates creative ideas into new or existing products/services and promotes effective problem- solving Utilizes creativity and responsible risk-taking to think outside-the-box when approaching tasks and/or solving problems Challenges boundaries and “the way we have always done things” instead of viewing them as constraints Networks with internal and external peers in search of new and innovative ideas and viable solutions On-the-Job Training: Find a new way to accomplish a task/routine in your area of responsibility. Assume the usual way of solving the problem is not available. Brainstorm alternative ways to solve it. Start with a clean sheet of paper, list all ideas that come to mind. Do not discuss pros/cons until all ideas are listed Identify a challenging problem facing your team or work group. Rather than attempting to solve the problem yourself, encourage team members to generate potential solutions. Discuss pros, cons and potential risks to the various alternative and identify a solution Express your thoughts about innovations and change to your organization and to potential resistors. Understand their apprehensions. Take time to ask questions that make people see things differently. Encourage and reward innovative thinking Shadowing: Seek out several individuals that are considered to be creative or innovative thinkers. Arrange a meeting to discuss how they approach issues and identify new ideas. Incorporate their approach/ideas into your own work Identify someone within the organization or outside of the organization, who performs a similar function to yours. Set up a meeting with them to exchange ideas on how to approach your work and share best practices Identify someone within the organization or outside of the organization, who performs a similar function to yours. Set up a meeting with them to exchange ideas on how to approach your work and share best practices with your direct report group Reflection/Debriefing: Identify a time when you were uncomfortable with a suggestion or idea. Ask yourself why. Assume the suggestion is correct and your position is wrong and reevaluate your thinking. Look for what might be beneficial in using this new approach. Focus on the potential uses of the idea and its feasibility. Communicate lessons learned with your managers and ask for input Read “The Circle of Innovation: “You Can’t Shrink your Way to Greatness” by Tom Peters. Identify specific concepts that can be implemented within your team. Debrief with team and/or peers Seek out feedback from stakeholder groups and peers inside and outside the organization to determine how they view your services and deliverables. Share this feedback with your organization and leverage it to generate innovative and creative thinking Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

33 KS Professional Development Framework Organizational Core Competencies - Innovation (cont’d)
Staff Managers Leaders Organizational Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for organizational, personal performance and enhanced contribution Innovation – Identifies and integrates creative ideas into new or existing products/services and promotes effective problem- solving Utilizes creativity and responsible risk-taking to think outside-the-box when approaching tasks and/or solving problems Challenges boundaries and “the way we have always done things” instead of viewing them as constraints Networks with internal and external peers in search of new and innovative ideas and viable solutions Action Learning: Volunteer to participate in an activity that you normally don’t do. Make a conscious effort to broaden your perspective or thinking when completing the activity and utilize techniques such as brainstorming to promote innovation. Ask for feedback from your manager upon completing the exercise Develop a new/ innovative idea in partnership with peers to address or solve a problem or need your have identified or heard within KS. Consider the pros and cons of the new idea, chart the potential benefits and compare them with the potential costs. Present the new idea to senior management that can offer feedback as well as authority to implement the new idea Teaching/training own or other groups Invite senior leaders and innovative thinkers from inside and outside the organization to discuss innovation in Education (or your respective area of expertise) and moving Education (or your respective area of expertise) forward. Share the vision and outcomes from the discussion with other senior KS leaders for validation and reactions Books: “The Circle of Innovation: You Can’t Shrink Your Way to Greatness” by Tom Peters “Managing Creativity and Innovation” by Harvard Business Essentials “Leading on the Creative Edge: Gaining Competitive Advantage through the Power of Creative Problem Solving” by Roger Firestien KS Course: N/A NA E-Learning: ”Proaction: Change, Innovation and Opportunity,” online course available through KS “Organizational Innovation: Making it Happen in Your Company,” Webinar available through the Center for Creative Leadership “The Essence of Innovation: 5 Principles, part of the Leading Effectively” Podcast series from CCL External Training: MGMT 7011: Creating Innovations: Hawaii Pacific University PSOC 6444: Innovations and Creativity: Hawaiÿi Pacific University COM 354: Communication in Innovation: University of Hawaiÿi at Hilo Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) Innovation Leadership: Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

34 KS Professional Development Framework Leadership Development Competencies - Developing and Mentoring Others Managers Leaders Leadership Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to overall business strategy Developing and Mentoring Others – Develops others through focused attention and effort on continuous learning and performance/career development, utilizing opportunities to provide constructive feedback as well as recognize achievement Helps others identify the specific knowledge, skills and abilities needed to complete work effectively Actively responds to requests for individual feedback, taking time for thoughtful reflection on colleagues’ strengths and developmental opportunities Willingly shares own technical knowledge with others, contributing to a shared knowledge base On-the-Job Training: Allow your team members to make mistakes and review the situation to help them focus on how they might do it differently the next time Assign projects to others based on the potential for them to develop key skills; ask them how you can support them on the project and be a resource to them as identified When your junior team members present an issue or problem, make it a habit to ask them “So what do you think we should do?” Jointly develop an approach or solution Identify employees with great potential and provide focused attention to them by checking-in regularly – be careful not to shortchange high performers who may not appear to need help Shadowing: Identify someone who is a great mentor and sit in on a mentor-mentee discussion to observe the interaction. Think about how you can follow their example and develop a similar relationship with your direct reports/mentee Identify someone who is a great mentor and sit in on a mentor-mentee discussion to observe the interaction. Think about how you can follow their example and develop a similar relationship with your mentee Reflection/Debriefing: Read “High Flyers: Developing the Next Generation of Leaders” by Morgan W. McCall. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with a peer or manager Read “Leader as a Coach: Strategies for Coaching and Developing Others” by David Bank Peterson and Mary Dee Hicks. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with your direct report group Action Learning: Volunteer to be a mentor; form a discussion group with other mentors within KS to discuss opportunities to clarify/refine role and share experiences Teaching/training own or other groups Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

35 KS Professional Development Framework Leadership Development Competencies - Developing and Mentoring Others (cont’d) Managers Leaders Leadership Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to overall business strategy Developing and Mentoring Others – Develops others through focused attention and effort on continuous learning and performance/career development, utilizing opportunities to provide constructive feedback as well as recognize achievement Helps others identify the specific knowledge, skills and abilities needed to complete work effectively Actively responds to requests for individual feedback, taking time for thoughtful reflection on colleagues’ strengths and developmental opportunities Willingly shares own technical knowledge with others, contributing to a shared knowledge base Books: “High Flyers: Developing the Next Generation of Leaders” by Morgan W. McCall “Leader as a Coach: Strategies for Coaching and Developing Others” by David Bank Peterson and Mary Dee Hicks KS Course: “How to Recognize Staff in Low Coast Ways” with Alt Kagesa “Coaching and Communicating with Your Staff” with Ray Ohta “Raising the Bar with Constructive Feedback” with Pam Chambers N/A E-Learning: “Coaching for Development” Available from VideoLearning Systems, Inc “The Art of Giving and Receiving Feedback” Available from VideoLearning Systems, Inc. External Training: Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

36 KS Professional Development Framework Leadership Development Competencies - Decision Making and Problem Solving Managers Leaders Leadership Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to overall business strategy Decision Making and Problem Solving – Diagnoses problems, determines possible solutions, and implements effective solutions in a timely manner Gathers pertinent information about a problem to determine its root cause by posing questions and identifying underlying issues Looks beyond obvious solutions and does not stop at the first answer, thinking through all plausible scenarios and consequences before making a decision Identifies the necessary and relevant information to make informed decisions in a timely manner On-the-Job Training: Learn how to apply various problem solving techniques such as SWOT analysis, Cause & Effect diagrams, Porter’s Five Forces, McKinsey 7s, etc. When a problem persists, retrace the steps you took to determine where a mistake is made or get someone to look at the problem from a fresh pair of eyes Consider more than one solution to a given situation or problem. Discuss pros and cons of each decision with a colleague before making a final decision Lead a business recovery or crisis management plan for a particular area Shadowing: Identify a leader you or others consider to be a good at decision making and problem solving. Request to follow him/her over the course of a project and note how he/she executes the project. Try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Identify a peer you or others consider to be a good at decision making and problem solving. Request to follow him/her over the course of a project and note how he/she executes the project. Try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Reflection/Debriefing: Review past decisions. Determine any misjudgments, solutions, consequences, timing, etc. Come up with ways to improve in the future and share with peers Attend “Problem Solving and Decision Making” by Ray Ohta and share a presentation on key learnings with your peers. Discuss how you can apply these learnings in your day-to-day management of your team Read “Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap .. and Others Don’t” by Jim Collins. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with a direct report group Attend “Problem Solving and Decision Making” by Ray Ohta and share a presentation on key learnings with your peers. Discuss how you can apply these learnings in your day-to-day leadership of your team Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

37 KS Professional Development Framework Leadership Development Competencies - Decision Making and Problem Solving (cont’d) Managers Leaders Leadership Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to overall business strategy Decision Making and Problem Solving – Diagnoses problems, determines possible solutions, and implements effective solutions in a timely manner Gathers pertinent information about a problem to determine its root cause by posing questions and identifying underlying issues Looks beyond obvious solutions and does not stop at the first answer, thinking through all plausible scenarios and consequences before making a decision Identifies the necessary and relevant information to make informed decisions in a timely manner Action Learning: Take a case study from the Harvard Business Review or a recent media event (e.g. recent financial crisis) as a team and share your thinking around strengths/weaknesses as they relate to decision making process and what some of the key takeaways might be Teaching/training own or other groups Take a case study from the Harvard Business Review or a recent media event (e.g., recent financial crisis) as a team and share your thinking around strengths/weaknesses as they relate to decision making process and what some of the key takeaways might be Books: “Decisions, Decisions: The Art of Effective Decision Making” by David A. Welch “Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap .. and Others Don’t” by Jim Collins KS Course: “Problem Solving and Decision Making” with Ray Ohta Business of the Business sessions with Trustees and CEO Team E-Learning: “Problem Solving and Decision Making: Good Decisions, Good Solutions;” online course by American Management Association N/A External Training: Executive coaching Off-site seminars/leadership training Advanced degrees (i.e., MBA, PhD programs) Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

38 KS Professional Development Framework Leadership Development Competencies - Trust and Integrity
Managers Leaders Leadership Competencies: Combination of knowledge, skills, attitudes and other characteristics that are important for leadership performance and are directly linked to overall business strategy Trust and Integrity – Conducts all business activities according to the highest organizational, social, ethical and legal standards Always honest and transparent in communications and dealing with internal and external clients Maintains high organizational standards that are aligned with the organization’s values, principles and code of conduct Confronts and addresses inappropriate and unethical behavior Shadowing: Identify a leader you or others consider to be a role model of integrity and trust. Observe him/her over a period of time and try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Identify a leader within or outside of KS you or others consider to be a role model of integrity and trust. Observe him/her over a period of time (or read about this person) and try to adopt some of his/her techniques in your work Reflection/Debriefing: Read “Managing with a Conscience: How to Improve Performance Through Integrity, Trust, and Commitment”: by Frank K. Sonnenberg. Note key concepts and learnings and debrief with a peer Read “Trust in the Balance: Building Successful Organizations on Results, Integrity, and Concern” by Robert Bruce Shaw. Note down key concepts and learnings and debrief with a peer Action Learning: Brainstorm on difficult scenarios that might demand trust and integrity as KS and how the team would respond Teaching/training own or other groups As a leadership team, review the internal audit findings for your area and others; discuss specific ways to address the findings Books: “Managing with a Conscience: How to Improve Performance Through Integrity, Trust, and Commitment” by Frank K. Sonnenberg “Trust in the Balance: Building Successful Organizations on Results, Integrity, and Concern” by Robert Bruce Shaw “The Accountable Organization: Reclaiming Integrity, Restoring Trust” by John Marchica KS Course: “Hawaiian and Christian Leadership” with Kahu Kordell Kekoa Business of the Business sessions with Trustees and CEO Team Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

39 KS Professional Development Framework Group Specific / Functional Requirements*
Staff Managers Leaders XXX To be added by KS, as necessary On-the-Job Training: Shadowing: Reflection/Debriefing: Action Learning: Books: KS Course: E-Learning: External Training: *Components of the Professional Development framework specific to various functional areas; these will need to be supplemented by KS for functional groups like Endowment or the Education group from Ka Pi’ina **Subject to review and approval by KS Note: The above are suggested offerings as developed by Towers Watson and are subject to further review , approval , development and deployment.

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41 Insert Training Title 48 point font
Standardized Training Format KS Pro Dev Strategy Insert Training Title 48 point font Purpose: The purpose of this PowerPoint is to provide a common and consistent format for all training that are included in the KS Professional Development Strategic Framework. Following these guidelines will provide a best practice foundation for trainings that are based on adult learning theory and facilitates its being posted in an online environment. Facilitator’s Notes: When creating these training the detailed use of Speakers Notes below each slide are required. The goal is to provide enough information so that anyone using this PowerPoint will be able to refer to the speakers notes and provide these training with consistent excellence. The background of this presentation is purposefully bland and non descript to allow you to more easily select the slide design you prefer. Feel free to be creative and select the back ground colors you think best. Please be mindful that Best practice indicates the use of no more than three colors per slide, furthermore these colors should pleasantly contrast so that the font clearly pops out of the background. Every Presentation Needs A Title: Think of the title page as the door to which your audience enters into your presentation. Minus a clear title your audience is forced to figure out or worst yet, guess what you are trying to tell them. Never leave your audience standing at the door of your presentation wondering where you are going. The quickest way to remedy this problem is to warmly invite your audience into your presentation by giving them a catchy and informative title at the beginning. The following bold printed items are required in the speakers notes of the Title Slide. The goal is to provide an up front big picture understanding of this training to those who will be presenting it. Total Training Time: (Insert time requirement to complete training. For example: 3-hour training) Measurable Desired Outcomes of training: (Some examples are…) Example – 80% of participants will their goals into SuccessFactors by 9/31. Example – 80% will agree or strongly agree that they will apply learning on the job. Needed Materials Lists: (Bulleted list of all training materials and equipment a trainer will need to complete this training, some examples are…) Laptop LCD projector Projection Screen or white wall Handouts Flipchart, easel, flipchart pens, tape Etc… (Insert Presenter’s Name & Department – 28pt font)

42 Learning Goals As a result of attending this training participants will be able to: Change in Attitude? Perform a Skill? Increase Knowledge? Learning Goals: Facilitators Note - on the Learning Goals slide please bulleted list top 3-5 learning goals that participants will gain as a result of attending this training. The above ASK model is based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, also known as KSAs: knowledge, Skills, and Abilities which describes what are typically the “ultimate goal of the training process – what learners hopefully acquire as the result of training.” It is not necessary to address all three of the above elements, but to help focus the training on tangible desired outcomes. A related point to consider is how will you measure your success in achieving your desired outcome: pre-post test, survey manager on application on the job, or the return on investment that resulted from the training. For example, as a result of attending this training participants will be able to A.S.K.: Change or strengthen an Attitude toward something Be able to perform a certain Skill Increase Knowledge in a specific topic area. Begin With The End In Mind: Before developing any presentation jot down your learning goals in specific terms at the top of your page and periodically review it to keep your work focused on these goals. Delete anything from your training that does not address your learning goals. The driving question is “by the end of this training how do I want my audience to be changed or different...?” Some examples: new knowledge, change in behavior or attitude. Although it’s true that “the more you know the more places you can go,“ too much detail will lead to mental exhaustion, mental exhaustion leads to confusion, and confusion to frustration. Always remember, when giving a presentation "less is more." A common tendency is to include unrelated points or illustrations just because they are interesting or witty. Although you will be tempted, DON’T do it! As wise King Solomon once said, “The more the words the less the meaning, and how does that profit anyone?” Also before you start developing answer the following question - “Who is my audience?” What is their backgrounds, do they have common interests, what is their knowledge level - as you prepare never lose sight of your target audience.

43 Training Agenda Desired outcomes of attending this training?
First Learning Goal Second Learning Goal (if needed) Third Learning Goal (if needed) How will I apply this learning at work? The goal of the Training Agenda slide is to prepare participants to learn by providing a brief over view of what they will be experiencing so that they can prepare themselves for learning. All too often trainers fail to open their training with an overview of what they will be covering. This is a sure sign that the trainer is self-centered versus audience centered. It is said that the average trainer spends 3-4 hours preparing for each hour of presentation time. Consequently, what seems painfully obvious to the speaker due to hours spent preparing is not obvious to the audience who just sat down moments ago. A brief overview at the beginning of your presentation will give your audience a heads up about what they will be learning. All of us (yes all of us are) are by nature self-centered. We all listen to the same radio station, WIIFM - What’s In It For Me. Effective trainers leverage this reality by quickly grabbing their audiences' attention with a well-sharpened “hook” or attention grabber. If you are trying to catch a mouse - use cheese, if you’re trying to catch bees - use honey, but if you want to snag your audiences' attention don't simply tell them what your presentation will do; tell them what it will do for them. Every audience sits down with this same question in mind and according to researchers unless you answer it in the opening minutes (2 - 5 minutes) of your presentation you will lose most of them before completing your first point. The million-dollar question that all audiences come with is - Why should I listen to you? The sooner you lure your audience into your presentation by answering this question, the sooner you will successfully set the hook. Basic Outline: Title Hook Their Interest Introduction: Brief Overview Key Points/Education Summary of Key Points Closing: Personal Application

44 (Standard Text Slide Insert Slide Title here)
1 2 3 4 Standard Text Slide: This is an example of a standard text slide which will make up the majority of your training deck. This standard slide is where you communicate the key points behind to achieve your learning goals. PowerPoint Tips: For easy of view from the back of the room, poorly lit spaces, and in online environments the larger the font size the better. Slide title should be a minimum of 48-point font, while body text should be a minimum of 36-point font. Using even larger font sizes are encouraged. It’s important to fonts (i.e., HawnTime, HawnOptimist, etc) that are sensitive to Hawaiian diacritical marks. As a general rule slides should contain no more than 4-lines of text per slide, less is even better. The goal is to create visually appealing slides that are filled with “white” or blank space for ease of understanding. Rather than go text heavy, simply capture main points and let the trainer elaborated via your speakers notes. Keep points concealed and uncover them as you need them to reduce visual overwhelm. Creatively emphasize with color to activate both the left and right sides of the brain. Keep to three colors per chart, and more than that can lead to visual confusion. Key Points/Education: KISS = Keep It Short and Simple. Never give more than three points per slide. Use sub-points with great caution, they can be confusing. Remember what wise King Solomon said, “The more the words the less the meaning, and how does that profit anyone?” Never use a big word when a small word will do. Your duty as a presenter is to "express not impress" -- clear communication is the goal. Always error on the side of the simple versus the complex. Every major point worth remembering requires at least one illustration, word picture, prop, analogy or illustrative story. Whenever possible create visual appeal and variety. It is said that "a picture is worth a thousand words". Effective trainers know this is not true; a picture is actually worth TEN THOUSAND words. Remember, “I hear, I forget; I see, I remember; I do, I understand". Whenever possible lead your audience through experiential activities. For example, instead of telling them how to cook a special dish show them how to cook that special dish, let them smell the delicious aromas, hear the sound of the sizzling frying pan, give them a taste after it's done – better yet let them do the cooking along side you. The more your audience is allowed to experience what you are trying to communicate to them via the 5 senses the more they will understand and remember.

45 Small Group Discussion
Driving Question… Self-Talk: 2-minutes to collect thoughts on the above discussion question. Table-Talk: 5-minutes for small group sharing Large Group Talk: Each table to share one or two thoughts with the larger group According to adult learning theory adults retain more when sharing their ideas and questions with others in small group settings. The Small Group Discussion slide above allows participants to first collect their thoughts so that no one feels placed on the spot and unprepared, then asks them to discuss their ideas in a small group setting (4-5 per table), and finally each table shares their best ideas with the larger group.

46 Break Time Facilitators Notes:
Providing short periodic breaks (e.g., one 10-minute break for each hour of training) will allow your participants to recharge their minds, address biological needs, and come back refreshed, focused, and ready to learn more.

47 Key Point Review 1 2 3 4 Facilitator’s Notes:
Very few people have the ability to remember something that they heard just once, especially if the information is new, has multiple points or is complex. Unfortunately many trainers forget this when speaking to their audience. Realize, that what seems obvious and simple to you, someone who has spent hours preparing and hopefully rehearsing their presentation, is often new, detailed and complex to your audience who sat down moments ago. Consequently, it is important to periodically summarize the major points of your presentation to your audience. As teachers discovered long ago - "repetition is the mother of learning." This is the reason your kindergarten teacher made you sing the ABC song at nausea when you were young. And guess what -- it worked! If I were to ask you to sing the ABC song right now I know you would be able to do it without missing a beat, even though you probably haven't sung that song in years. So if you want your audience to remember what you said - "tell them what you will tell them, tell them, and then tell them what you told them".

48 Application Plan Driving Question… I will apply what I learned at work by… Self-Talk: 2-minutes to collect thoughts on the above discussion question. Table-Talk: 5-minutes for small group sharing Large Group Talk: Each table to share one or two thoughts with the larger group The Application Plan slide above allows participants to first collect their thoughts so that no one feels placed on the spot unprepared, then share their ideas in a small group setting (4-5 per table), and finally each table shares their best idea with the larger group. Facilitator’s Notes: You've just completed the bulk of your presentation and if all went well you now feel a sense of accomplishment that you were able to connect with your audience, clearly communicate your major points, and everyone seemed to be thoroughly interested in what you were saying. Terrific, you now have your audience right where you want them. It is said that "words without deeds are dead", the same is true for presentations without personal applications. We all have heard the saying “talk is cheap, where is the action." If you want your training to have impact and really make a difference your audience needs personal application. Without a specific point of application, a place where your audience can actually apply what they have just heard into their workplace, the transfer of information into action will not happen. Here we ask participants to self reflect and discuss with peers ways they can apply what they just learned.

49 Mahalo for your time, make it a great day
Evaluation Before leaving please complete an evaluation form and leave it at the door on your way out Mahalo for your time, make it a great day Facilitators Notes: The following are standard post-training evaluation questions used by HR and are designed to fit on one page. The first three questions are close end and ask for a numeric rating on a scale of one to five; while the last three questions are open end. Close Ended Evaluations Questions: (Please rate on a scale of 1-5: 1 = Strongly Disagree to 5 = Strongly agree) The overall quality of the training was high. I will be able to apply this training to my job. The presenter(s) were well prepared and organized. Open Ended Evaluation Questions: Please list two things you learned or will do as a result of this training: What did you like BEST about this training? What would you CHANGE to make it better?

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