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Denver, CO ● July 23-25, 2009 ● American Writer’s & Artists, Inc. Please turn off your cell phone. Thanks!

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Presentation on theme: "Denver, CO ● July 23-25, 2009 ● American Writer’s & Artists, Inc. Please turn off your cell phone. Thanks!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Denver, CO ● July 23-25, 2009 ● American Writer’s & Artists, Inc. Please turn off your cell phone. Thanks!

2 By Jennifer Stevens AWAI’s Ultimate Travel Writer’s Program Denver, CO July 2009 Please turn off your cell phone. Thanks!

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4  You’re afraid your articles won’t be good enough…  You’re afraid you’ll say the wrong thing to an editor…  You love the idea of being a travel writer, but you never do anything with what you’ve written… 4

5 “Eighty percent of success is showing up.” Woody Allen 5

6  You know WAY more than the average wanna-be travel writer  You know more than a lot of working, professional travel writers 6

7  Write.  Once you've written something, send it to an editor. 7

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9  Apply to every kind of writing.  Separate a good writer from a superior one.  Make your writing more readable and more saleable. 9

10 Replace “to be” with verbs that do more.  The girl was at her desk  The girl slouched at her desk. 10

11  The mayor was smiling as he was giving his acceptance speech. Recast the sentence to eliminate “was.”  The mayor smiled as he gave his acceptance speech.  The mayor grinned as he delivered his acceptance speech. 11

12 Choose verbs that describe an action or offer a visual image.  The man went down the hall.  The man lumbered down the hall. 12

13  The wind blew. What else could you say?  The wind whipped off the water.  The wind walloped the trees.  The wind sashayed by as we picnicked at the water’s edge.  The wind slithered through the medina. 13

14 Get rid of “there is” and “there are”  There is one guilty pleasure remaining.  One guilty pleasure remains. 14

15 Night came on. The music, blaring from competing cassette players, reached distorted levels. Several people started dancing in the aisles, their sinuous arms swirling in the cloud of blue smoke. The ferromozas played matchmaker, pulling the foreigners to their feet and handing them over to dancing girls. One of the Englishmen, giddy with the sensuality of the moment, tumbled mid-merengue into the arms of an olive-eyed Cubana, while the ferromozas cheered and clapped." From "A Cup of Cuban Coffee," The Best American Travel Writing 2003, p

16 The temperature was stuck in the low 40’s, rain just a breath away from sleet lashed our faces, sullen fog wadded the brown hills and muffled the incessant pounding of the ocean. But the weather still wasn’t bad enough for us, or rather, not bad in quite the right way. We birders were hoping for wind. A stiff west wind, to be precise. Laskin, David. “It’s Cold, Wet and Treeless, But Bird- Watchers Love it," New York Times, May 1,

17 1. The town’s well-tended gardens have lilies, hollyhocks, and tulips in bloom. 2. The entire country has four main roads. 17

18  Prefer shorter words: components  parts utilize  use facilitate  ease 18

19  Prefer specific words vehicle  ’98 Nissan many  six hot  94 degrees 19

20  Prefer more common words dwelling  home modicum  some subterranean  underground 20

21 1. Physicians are at your disposal at the medical center only a few hundred yards from the Hilton and Sheraton Hotels—and the doctors speak fluent English, and other languages can also be covered upon request. 2. As we walked in, the mouth-watering aroma aroused my hunger pangs. 21

22  Never use any more words than you absolutely need to.  Use fewer words. 22

23 This sentence is far too long… Apart from the ubiquitous Cognac, which exports all over the world, the lesser-known Pineau is a tasty local brew – sweet as a fortified wine – made out of grape skins soaked in Cognac, which packs the sort of a punch that works as an ideal pick-me-up after a long days sightseeing – or house-buying – and, as they say locally, it “opens the appetite” for a host of other local specialties, which range from the delicious pâté de rillettes made out of the best cut of pork; the chou farci – a rustic dish of stuffed cabbage leaves, which is sometimes still prepared like they used to – in a cauldron over a roaring log fire – and which makes ideal eating in the chillier winter months; and the cagouille – patois for snail – also the nickname given to the Charentais because of their slow pace of life – which is cooked in a rich sauce made of butter and garlic – mmm,delicious! – and since recent research has shown that snails are good for your arteries, it’s healthy too! 1 sentence, 171 words 23

24 Similar to Cognac (exported from here to points around the globe) is pineau—a lesser-known, local brew. Sweet as a fortified wine, pineau is made from grape skins soaked in Cognac. It works as an ideal pick-me-up after a long day out. The locals say it “opens the appetite” for a host of other regional specialties—pâté de rillettes, made out of the best cut of pork; chou farci, a rustic dish of stuffed cabbage leaves, sometimes still prepared in a cauldron over a roaring log fire; and cagouille – patois for snail – which is cooked in a rich sauce made of butter and garlic. (Cagouille also happens to be the nickname given to the Charentais because of their slow pace of life.) 5 sentences, 114 words 24

25 1. As we walked in, the mouth-watering aroma aroused my hunger pangs. 2. Later my companions and I convened at the outdoor Jacuzzi before dinner. 25

26  Insert a header in your document with your contact info  Follow the publication’s lead for article format 26

27 Montreal article for “Destinations”, 503 words1 Jane Writer, Warming Ears and Eating Well in Canada's Frigid North By Jane Writer Article text begins here… 27

28  Worth having on your shelf On Writing Well by William Zinsser Words Fail Me by Patricia O’Conner  What I’m reading right now The Best American Travel Writing (released annually, I buy it every year) Spunk & Bite by Arthur Plotnik Travel as a Political Act by Rick Steves 28

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30 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Published by: American Writers & Artists Inc. 245 NE 4th Avenue, Suite 102 Delray Beach, FL 33483


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