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Systems Coaching Susan Barrett Implementer Partner OSEP TA Center on PBIS Director, PBIS Regional TTAC Sheppard Pratt Health.

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Presentation on theme: "Systems Coaching Susan Barrett Implementer Partner OSEP TA Center on PBIS Director, PBIS Regional TTAC Sheppard Pratt Health."— Presentation transcript:

1 Systems Coaching Susan Barrett Implementer Partner OSEP TA Center on PBIS Director, PBIS Regional TTAC Sheppard Pratt Health System

2 Today Coaching Defined Lessons Learned Building Skills and Competencies – Tools Data Collection

3 Maximizing Your Session Participation Work with your team Consider 4 questions: – Where are we in our implementation? – What do I hope to learn? – What did I learn? – What will I do with what I learned? Consider 4 questions: – Where are we in our implementation? – What do I hope to learn? – What did I learn? – What will I do with what I learned?

4 Where are you in implementation process? Adapted from Fixsen & Blase, 2005 We think we know what we need so we are planning to move forward (evidence- based) Exploration & Adoption Let’s make sure we’re ready to implement (capacity infrastructure) Installation Let’s give it a try & evaluate (demonstration) Initial Implementation That worked, let’s do it for real (investment) Full Implementation Let’s make it our way of doing business (institutionalized use) Sustainability & Continuous Regeneration

5 Leadership Team Action Planning Worksheets: Steps Self-Assessment: Accomplishments & Priorities Leadership Team Action Planning Worksheet Session Assignments & Notes: High Priorities Team Member Note-Taking Worksheet Action Planning: Enhancements & Improvements Leadership Team Action Planning Worksheet

6 “ Fidelity of implementation of academic and behavior interventions is documented before measuring effects and assigning worth to them or blaming children for continuing failure. Continuing emphasis and dialogue on the importance of treatment fidelity speaks to the need for documenting the extent to which essential features of effective core instruction are in place and implemented with integrity (cf. Miller, 2010)” Algozzine, Putnam and Horner 2012 Insights on Learning Disabilities

7 Start with the questions… What is a Coach? A role in which an individual provides another with direction and support to accomplish their goals. Denton and Hasbrouck (2009). What is Coaching? Application of a set of skills that provides dynamic support and facilitation to build the capacity of school and district leadership teams to implement a Multi- tiered System of Supports (MTSS), aligned with district and school improvement plans, to enhance student outcomes. (Florida MTSS) How is coaching delivered? Single person or group effort? What are the core features of coaching?

8 More Questions What are the competencies/skills required for coaching? How does an organization support a coaching model? How is leadership linked to coaching? Effective and linked leadership at every level (school, district, state) is key to the success of any systemic change, and systems change staff (i.e., coaches) have full- time responsibility for guiding implementation processes and support on-site change leadership teams (Adelman and Taylor, 2007) How does leadership across state, districts and schools create the pathways for coaching? Why invest in coaching? Research indicated that new strategies and interventions are not implemented with integrity unless a consultant (coach) is continuously involved (Lewis and Newcomer, 2002)

9 Coaching Support in the Literature Florida MTSS (APBS, Amanda March 2011) Coaching has been found to… – Impact teacher attitudes such as job satisfaction & willingness to try new approaches – Enhance transfer of training, fidelity, and sustainability of new practices – Enhance teacher efficacy – Be popular with educators – Enhance educator collaboration Coaching literature remains unclear with regard to… – Which model is most effective – Effects on student outcomes – What knowledge, skills, and activities are required – How to best evaluate coaching – How to best prepare coaches

10 Coaching for Change APBS, March 2011 Coaching or facilitation capacity refers to a system’s ability to organize personnel and resources for prompting and encouraging local school training and implementation efforts (Sugai & Horner, 2006). Research indicates that new strategies and interventions are not implemented with integrity unless a consultant (coach) is continually involved (Lewis & Newcomer, 2002). Effective and linked leadership at every level (school, district, state) is key to the success of any systemic change, and systems change staff (i.e., coaches) have full-time responsibility for guiding implementation processes and support on-site change leadership teams (Adelman & Taylor, 2007)

11 Training Outcomes Related to Training Components Training Outcomes Training Components Knowledge of Content Skill Implementation Classroom Application Presentation/ Lecture Plus Demonstration Plus Practice Plus Coaching/ Admin Support Data Feedback 10% 5% 0% 30% 20% 0% 60% 60% 5% 95% 95% 95% Joyce & Showers, 2002

12 Coaching Defined in PBIS “Goal is to give skills away” Coaching is the active and iterative delivery of: – (a) prompts that increase successful behavior, and – (b) corrections that decrease unsuccessful behavior. – Coaching is done by someone with credibility and experience with the target skill(s) – Coaching is done on-site, in real time – Coaching is done after initial training – Coaching is done repeatedly (e.g. monthly) – Coaching intensity is adjusted to need – Multi-faceted – Changes over time

13 Outcomes of Coaching Fluency with trained skills Adaptation of trained concepts/skills to local contexts and challenges And new challenges that arise Rapid redirection from miss-applications Increased fidelity of overall implementation Improved sustainability Most often due to ability to increase coaching intensity at critical points in time.

14 What do they do again? How can anyone possess that many skills? Professional Development – Teaching, participating, Supporting, Delegating Leadership Support Problem Solving Skills Resource Provider Fluency with content area Facilitation and Communication Interpersonal Skills

15 Types of Coaching Coaching for Individual Change: focus on skill development, support and performance feedback (content specific: academic, behavior) Coaching for Team/Group Change: focus on collaboration and facilitation, group dynamics Coaching for Systems Change: focus on organizational change

16 Where do you start? Applying the Phases of Implementation to growing adult skills and competencies Using data to guide starting point! – Role – Assessing current knowledge and skills – Know your limits – Leverage and authority

17 Organizing the Scope of Work Can we organize our current inventory of PD, tools and resources by using Types of Coaching across Systems/Data/Practices/Outcomes for adult learners?

18 Practices/Skills The technical skill set required to impact individual performance Content Fluent (academic, behavior, mental health) Data collection Performance Feedback Behavioral Consultation “Soft skills” Types of Coaching Systems Conditions that support individual skill development Job description match role/function FTE in budget Supervision and Support of Coach within Building Allocation of time and resources for observation, consultation, data analysis Link to student outcomes Link to staff satisfaction, teacher efficacy and teacher retention Data Information required to guide skill development process Action Plan with short/long term measurable goals Self Assessment Process Measures/Fidelity Checks Performance Feedback Measure Student Outcomes Data used for continuous regeneration (PEP/PIP) Individual or Content Coach

19 Practices/Skills The technical skill set required to achieve fidelity Team Initiated Problem Solving Team Building/Collaboration Data Analysis Team Facilitation “Soft Skills” Types of Coaching Systems Conditions that support professional learning communities Administrative Support and Participation Link to School Improvement Clearly defined role and function with building level authority, leverage Data Information required to guide team development process Action Plan with short/long term measurable goals Self Assessment Process Measures/Fidelity Checks Performance Feedback Measure Progress Monitoring Tools Evaluation Tools Student Outcomes Data used for continuous regeneration (PEP/PIP) Team or Group

20 Organizing the Practice Features

21 Phases of Coaching Coach needs to adjust to situation (teams skill set, knowledge and commitment to change) C1- Teaching/Transfer of new skill set: Define the roles and tasks (BOQ, BAT) of the ‘follower’ or team and supervise them closely. Decisions are made by the coach/facilitator and announced, so communication is largely one-way. Team will lack fluency who but are enthusiastic and committed. They need direction and supervision to get them started. C2 – Coaching – High task focus, high relationship focus – coach still define roles and tasks, but seeks ideas and suggestions from the team. communication is much more two-way. For people who have some competence but can lack commitment. They need direction and supervision because they are still relatively inexperienced. They also need support and praise to build their self-esteem, and involvement in decision-making to restore their commitment. C3 – Participating / Supporting – Low task focus, high relationship focus – coach pass day-to-day decisions, such as task allocation and processes, to the team. The leader facilitates and takes part in decisions, but control is with the team. For people who have competence, but lack confidence or motivation. They do not need much direction because of their skills, but support is necessary to bolster their confidence and motivation. C4 – Delegating – Low task focus, low relationship focus – coach still involved in decisions and problem-solving, but control is with the team. The team decides when and how the coach will be involved. For people who have both competence and commitment-they are able and willing to work on a project by themselves with little supervision or support. (adapted from Situational Leadership. Blanchard and Hersey)

22 Development of the Team D4 – High Competence, High Commitment – Fluent and experienced with innovation, and comfortable with their own ability to do it well. May even be more skilled than the coach. D3 – High Competence, Variable Commitment – Experienced and capable, but may lack the confidence to go it alone, or the motivation to do it well / quickly. D2 – Some Competence, Low Commitment – May have some relevant skills, but won’t be able to do the job without help. The task or the situation may be new to them. D1 – Low Competence, High Commitment – Generally lacking the specific skills required for the job in hand, but has the confidence and / or motivation to tackle it. 22

23 Practices/Skills The technical skill set required Implementation Science Organizational Behavior Management Applied Behavior Analysis Standards of Professional Learning Types of Coaching Systems Conditions that support organizational change Commitment to Continuous Regeneration Facilitative Administrator Supports PEP/PIP Cycle Recruitment and Selection Process Curriculum Development Certification Requirements Data Information required to guide change process Action Plan with short/long term measurable goals Self Assessment Process Measures/Fidelity Checks Performance Feedback Measure Progress Monitoring Tools Evaluation Tools Student Outcomes Data used for continuous regeneration (PEP/PIP) Systems

24 IN WHAT WAYS CAN AN ADMINISTRATOR SUPPORT THE MOVE TO A COACHING MODEL? Explore research around the effectiveness of a coaching model and share with the staff Provide input into the SELECTION of building level and district level coach/coaches Allocate time for coaches to successfully fulfill their roles Develop job descriptions Schedules time to meet with coaches and reflect on a regular basis (weekly/biweekly) Develop written policies and procedures to evaluate coaching performance Orientation and support is provided for new coaches Solicits formal feedback from teachers who receiving coaching services Revises policies and procedures to support both the EBP (Evidence based practice) and the Coaching system Documents barriers to coaching

25 Organizing the Work Developing the Coach Guidebook using the WIKI In development

26 Resources and Tools Coach Self Assessment Coach Checklist Benchmarks of Quality Practice Profiles Implementation Snapshots PBIS Action Plan Problem Solving Team Agenda

27 Practice Profile Defining “it” Through the Development and Use of Practice Profiles Guiding Principles identified Critical Components articulated For each critical component: –Identified gold standard –Identified acceptable variations in practice –Identified ineffective practices and undesirable practices Hall and Hord, 2010 Implementing Change: Patterns, Principles, and Potholes (3rd Edition) and Adapted from work of the Iowa Area Education Agency

28 Practice Profiles : Pay Now or Pay Later Identifies Critical Components –Guiding Principles –Critical Components Match the Guiding Principles –Core Activities to Achieve the Critical Components For each Critical Component: –Identified “gold standard” activities –Identified acceptable variations in practice –Identified ineffective practices and undesirable practices Your Implementation Support Identify and Support Implementation Team Provide Conceptual Overview and Rationales Provide Resources, Worksheets, Templates Facilitate Consensus Building Capacity Building

29 Practice Profiles Each critical component is a heading Levels of performance are defined for each critical component (prescribed and proscribed) The development of the Practice Profile enables the functional use of Implementation Drivers Critical ComponentDesiredAcceptable Variation Unacceptable Variation Harmful Variation Critical Component 1: Description Description of practitioner behavior

30 Coaching for Individual Change Professional Practices in Problem Solving: Benchmarks and Innovation Configurations Iowa Area Education Agency Directors of Special Education, 1994 Focused Practice Content Fluent (academic, behavior, mental health) Data collection Performance Feedback Behavioral Consultation Communication Other “soft skills”

31 Coaching for Individual Change Professional Practices in Problem Solving: Benchmarks and Innovation Configurations Iowa Area Education Agency Directors of Special Education, 1994 Focused Practice Content Fluent (academic, behavior, mental health) Data collection Performance Feedback Behavior Consultation Communication Other “soft skills”

32 Example: Individual Coaching Performance Feedback as a Critical Component

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34 Target Individual: Building Level Coach

35 Example: Individual Coaching Critical Component: Performance Feedback Target Individual: Building Level Coach

36 Implementation Snapshot Used during training to clearly define each critical feature and the research that supports use and potential benefit to overall school climate. The trainer facilitator will provide training slides for each feature. Teams will have an opportunity to use their guidebook and items brought to the training to use during action planning sessions. Roles of each participant are clearly described each snapshot to ensure clear expectations. Administrators are expected to play an active role. Coaches are expected to guide process, communicate with the district coordinator and share implementation products and examples as needed. Teams will walk away from the training with an annual action plan that will help guide the effort.

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38 Organizational/Systems Change OR The Development of Effective, Productive, Collaborative Systems that create optimal Conditions for Learning Systems Change Coach (Facilitator/ Communicator) Support to Leadership Skill Coach for Practitioners Roles of the School Climate Specialist

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40 Top Small Group Hours

41 Coaching: Total Hours For Each Group Over All Visits

42 Hours Spent On Each Type Of Coaching Over All Visits


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