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Guided Reading instruction for ELL Students VDOE English SOL Institute October 30, 2014 Paul Teller ESOL Liasion K-5 Chesterfield County Public Schools.

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Presentation on theme: "Guided Reading instruction for ELL Students VDOE English SOL Institute October 30, 2014 Paul Teller ESOL Liasion K-5 Chesterfield County Public Schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 Guided Reading instruction for ELL Students VDOE English SOL Institute October 30, 2014 Paul Teller ESOL Liasion K-5 Chesterfield County Public Schools Patsy Stine, ESOL Teacher 3-5 Elizabeth Scott Elementary Chesterfield County Public Schools

2 Objectives 1.Describe best practices in literacy instruction for English language learners (ELLs). 2.Compare these best practices to guided reading instruction provided to all students. 3.Adapt small group guided lesson plans to meet the needs for ELLs.

3 Building Background Guided Reading- Part of a balanced literacy program that includes shared reading and independent reading. A teacher works with a small group, ideally no more than 6. All students are within the same instructional level (independent + 1)

4 Building Background The National Reading Panel (NRP) identified the areas that determine literacy development for native English Speakers. These are usually the areas of focus during a guided reading lesson. –Phonemic Awareness –Phonics –Fluency –Vocabulary –Reading Comprehension NRP (2000)

5 Building Background What about research on ELLs? Report of the National Literacy Panel (NLP) on Language-Minority Children and Youth. Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE)

6 What does research say? 1.Teaching students to read in their 1 st language promotes higher levels of reading achievement in English.

7 What does research say? 2. What we know about good instruction and curriculum in general also holds true for ELLs. –Clear goals and objectives –Meaningful, challenging and motivating contexts –Curriculum rich with content –Well-designed, clearly structured and appropriately paced instruction –Active engagement and participation –Opportunities to practice, apply and transfer new learning. –Feedback on correct and incorrect responses. Assessment. –Periodic review and practice

8 What does research say? 3. Teachers must modify instruction of ELLs to take into account their language limitations. ELLs are more likely to make progress in the early stages of reading. As content gets more challenging language demands increase (vocabulary and syntax). High quality reading instruction alone will be insufficient. They also need to increase the scope and sophistication of oral academic language.

9 Looking at Model Used at CCPS Pre-A (Pre-K) Emergent (K) Early Reading (1st) Transitional (2nd and 3rd) Fluent (3rd and beyond)

10 Key Components Conferencing with students individually to promote use of strategies in decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Fast pace to so that students can promote exposure to a variety of text. Building sight words and targeting specific word study skills in the earlier stages.

11 Characteristics of Pre- A and Emergent Readers Know fewer than 40 upper and lower case letters. Few few if any sounds. Developing concept of word. Learning to track from left to write. Have very few if any sight words.

12 Pre-A Lesson Plans Alfabet tracing Word work with names Working with sounds: Rhyming, clapping syllables, picture sorts Working with books – Envouraging oral language – concept of word – locating first and last words or letters, periods, capital and lowercase letters and periods.

13 Emergent Lesson Plans 2 Days Sight word review using white boards Introduce the book and new vocabulary Text reading with prompts – Does it make sense – Get your mouth ready Teaching Points and modeling – Using pictures clues – Monitor with known words

14 Emergent Lesson Plans Teach a new sight word Word Study – Pictures sorts – Making Words – Sounds Guided Writing-On day 2 instead of word study – Dictated or open ended sentences.

15 Characteristics of Early Readers Know all their letters and sounds Are learning how to apply these skills while reading text. Know about sight words

16 Early Guide Reading Lesson Plans 2 Days Sight word review with a white board Introduce new book and vocabulary Prompt students while reading the text. Teaching Points – Word Solving Strategies – Fluency and Comprehension Discussion Prompt Teach a New sight word

17 Early Guide Reading Lesson Plans 2 Days Word Study – Picture sorts – Making Words – Sound Boxes – Analogy Chart Guided Writing (Day 2) – Dictated or Student generated sentences. – Beginning, Middle, and End – Somebody wanted but so (SWBS)

18 Transitional Reading Stage Have a large bank of sight words Still learning phonics skills and how to decode bigger words. More focus on comprehension.

19 Transitional Plan Before Reading 1.Preview the text 2.Provide a brief summary 3.Introduce new words students are not able to decode or do not know the meanings 4.No more than 4 or 5

20 Transitional Plan During Reading Students read text individually Teacher conferences with individual students Teacher prompts for fluency and understanding. Teacher takes anecdotal notes

21 Transitional Plan After Reading Discussion Questions Retelling Word Study Sound Boxes Analogy chart make a big word

22 Transitional Plan Day 3 or 4 Reread for fluency. Guided Writing – Beginning Middle End (BMG) – Five Finger Retell – S-W-B-S

23 Fluent Reader Characteristics Able to read most words automatically Developing deeper comprehension skills

24 Fluent Reader Lesson Plans Introducing the book or the next section Introducing new vocabulary Introduce the focus and model a strategy – Retell a Very important part (VIP) – Character traits – make connections Read and respond – Student reads a page or two then responds in writing according to the strategy.

25 Fluent Reader Lesson Plans Prompt for vocabulary or comprehension Guided Writing – I poems – Microtheme – Alternate ending – Biopoems – Compare and contrast – Cause/effect

26 How do we make sure we meet the needs of English Learners Balancing the need to expose students to large volumes of text with taking time to build the following skills and knowledge – Background knowledge – Vocabulary- What tier I words do they know? – Oral language

27 CREDE & NLP Research Conclusions: 2. What we know about good instruction and curriculum in general holds true for English learners as well; BUT 3....teachers must modify instruction of ELLs to take into account their language limitations.

28 What does that look like during Guided Reading within the Jan Richardson Model? Best Practice + modification/accommodation “The best recommendation to emerge from our review favors instruction that combines interactive and direct approaches.” -Goldberg p.18

29 Best instruction for ELLs combines 2 Approaches: What does that mean? 1. Interactive Approach give & take between learners and teacher. teacher encourages higher levels of thinking, speaking, & reading (WIDA language domains) at students’ instructional level. Examples: academic conversations, turn & talk, group brainstorming.

30 Best instruction for ELLs combines 2 Approaches: What does that mean? 2. Direct Approach explicit & direct teaching of skills or knowledge modeling, instructional input, corrective feedback, & guided practice. Examples: Letter sound associations, spelling patterns, vocabulary words, building background, support

31

32 What does research say? -Goldenberg What we know about good instruction and curriculum in general holds true for ELLs modification/ accommodation

33 ➔ Clear goals and objectives ➔ Meaningful, challenging and motivating contexts- vocabulary and background building experiences- videos, realiabackground building experiences- Help students make connections

34 ➔ Curriculum rich with content ➔ Well-designed, clearly structured and appropriately paced instruction ➔ Active engagement and participation-multiple opportunities to practice speaking English-turn & talkmultiple opportunities to practice speaking

35 Written & oral interaction with the text- graphic organizers give students a ‘picture’ of literary structures ➔ Opportunities to practice, apply and transfer new learning.

36 ➔ Feedback on correct and incorrect responses. Assessment.correctincorrect ELLs must be encouraged to be “risk- takers”. An exploratory culture in the classroom supports risk-taking.

37 –vocabulary, background building, transfer new learning, summarize, synthesize. transfer new learning, summarize, synthesize. ➔ Periodic review and practice

38 What does research say? High quality reading instruction alone will be insufficient. They also need to… increase the scope and sophistication of oral academic language. thinking stems & sentence starters practice and apply with active engagementpractice and apply with active engagement

39 References August, D. and Shanahan, T., eds Developing Literacy in Second-Language Learners: Report of the National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; quote from p Genesee, F., Lindholm-Leary, K., Saunders, W., and Christian, D Educating English Language Learners. New York: Cambridge University Press. Goldenberg, C. (2008). Teaching English language learners: What research does-and does not say. American Educator, 32(2), 8-23, National Reading Panel Report of the National Reading Panel—Teaching Children to Read: AnEvidence- Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for ReadingInstruction (Report of the subgroups). Washington, DC : National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

40 Disclaimer Reference within this presentation to any specific commercial or non-commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Virginia Department of Education.


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