Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Early Reading Fluency: Rationale and Insights from cognitive neuroscience The view from the Independent Evaluation Group Helen Abadzi Independent Evaluation.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Early Reading Fluency: Rationale and Insights from cognitive neuroscience The view from the Independent Evaluation Group Helen Abadzi Independent Evaluation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Early Reading Fluency: Rationale and Insights from cognitive neuroscience The view from the Independent Evaluation Group Helen Abadzi Independent Evaluation Group World Bank March 2008

2 Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) Project Performance Assessment Reviews in primary education Comoros 1997 Comoros 1997 Burkina Faso 2000 Burkina Faso 2000 Chile 2000 Chile 2000 Madagascar 2001 Madagascar 2001 Senegal 2001 Senegal 2001 Maldives 2002 Maldives 2002 Brazil 2002 Brazil 2002 Romania 2002 Romania 2002 Guinea 2003 Guinea 2003 Honduras 2003 [Panama 2003 – observations] Niger 2004 Yemen 2004 Uruguay 2005 Argentina 2006 Mozambique 2007 Egypt 2007 IEG - formerly OED

3 Broad findings of PPARs: Enrollments increased everywhere but…. (a) The schools of the poor may teach very little Some schools closed about 30% of the time in Mali about 30% of the time in Mali Teachers often absent Teachers often absent Few if any books in class Few if any books in class Class time spent in little activity Class time spent in little activity copying copying engaged in incomprehensible material engaged in incomprehensible material playing outside playing outside Many principals, ministry officials, supervisors complacent Many principals, ministry officials, supervisors complacent (b) Poorer students cannot read well until the end of primary (if then)

4

5 The neuroscience of reading Memory principles Letters = Object recognition Visual complexity in languages and scripts

6 The fluency paradox: Minimum reading speed needed for comprehension If you don’t read fast enough, by the end of a sentence you forget the beginning!

7 Short-term memory Crucial for reading comprehension Long-term memory 12 seconds at most About 7 items 4 pictures

8 To read an average sentence in an ‘average’ language roughly.. 7 items in 12 seconds… students must read at least a word per second students must read at least a word per second with 95% accuracy (correlates.87 with speed). with 95% accuracy (correlates.87 with speed) words per minute minimum words per minute minimum 7 words in 12 seconds equals words per minute! 7 words in 12 seconds equals words per minute!

9 To get through the narrow opening the mind creates chunks of information Letters and other small items become larger pieces that pass as one through working memory Letters and other small items become larger pieces that pass as one through working memory small items must be chunked and practiced to the point of fluent performance small items must be chunked and practiced to the point of fluent performance We must act in milliseconds! We must act in milliseconds! Vast implications for reading, math calculations, motor skills Vast implications for reading, math calculations, motor skills This is how children decode ever larger units – from syllables to words This is how children decode ever larger units – from syllables to words How do students get to fluency? How do students get to fluency?

10 Sophisticated skills, higher-level knowledge are created from ever-larger chunks practiced to the point of automatic recall

11 Brain imaging changed the landscape of reading assessment

12 Brain imaging techniques (since about 1995 ) Example: Brain activation patterns of literates and illiterates

13 A special brain area gets activated (fusiform gyrus, occipitotemporal lobe) 3 primary reading areas in the brain: 2 for single letters, slow reading 1 for automatic reading All 3 are used simultaneously

14 The brain becomes “programmed” for automatic reading Nerve “wiring” develops in children’s brains (“White matter” needed for reading and larger working memory-Nagy et al. 2005) The occipito-temporal pathway gets activated The brain identifies entire words rather than single letters Long and short words are read equally fast (silently) each word or phrase becomes an item Speed rises to 250+ words per minute People can’t help but read Pay attention to message rather than the print

15 Reading automaticity: (the literacy vaccine!) Almost an ‘on-off” switch Only through consistent pairing of sounds and letters Textbooks Feedback Homework Class time With practice children may pass from the off state to on in 6 weeks

16 Word superiority effect: we read faster the letters of words we know but… People become a fluent readers without knowing the language Reading sacred texts

17 To the brain, letters are just objects Brain has rules for processing shapes Brain has rules for processing shapes Some characters are more visually complex than othersSome characters are more visually complex than others Some languages have more letters than othersSome languages have more letters than others Some letter combinations are more complex (psycholinguistic grain size)Some letter combinations are more complex (psycholinguistic grain size) Various languages-scripts have different implications for reaching automaticity Various languages-scripts have different implications for reaching automaticity Automatic readers use rules that to beginners are incomprehensible Automatic readers use rules that to beginners are incomprehensible And instructional time must be used efficiently! And instructional time must be used efficiently!

18 We always need letters We read by recognizing letters in a row, with known words and context hints handled separately Letters account for 62% of the adult reading rate Words 16%, context 22%, individual variance 6% The processes are not redundant, they work on different words. Like computer technicians fixing problems – letters are generalists Words are not usually recognized as wholes, the visual system must isolate and recognize the individual letters to get the word Implications: Methods that get children to read whole words are not efficient If the children read in one language, they can read in another (in same script). Pelli, Dennis and Katharine Tillman. Parts, wholes, and context in reading: A triple dissociation. PLoS ONE, August 2007, e 680.

19 Visual complexity of characters Number of characters to automatize… probably affects the time needed to acquire automaticity

20 Dhivehi – possibly the simplest functioning alphabet in the world

21 Amharic Exact spelling but much larger matrix with some pattern irregularities More time needed to acquire automaticity, fluency

22 Kannada – high error rates complex forms, multiple visual patterns Half-consonant combinations and vowel combinations result in a matrix of about 300 characters that must be automatized Some are unpredicatable

23 Hebrew voweled (small grains) and unvoweled (large grains) but the letters are separate Kol benei ha'adam noldu benei xorin veshavim be'erkam uvizxuyoteihem. Kulam xonenu batevuna uvematspun, lefixax xova 'aleihem linhog ish bere'ehu beruax shel axava. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

24 Voweled Arabic – small “grains” Unvoweled Arabic – large “grains” connected letters with rules about connections (and lack thereof) وَإِذِ ارْتَحَلُوا شَرْقاً وَجَدُوا سَهْلاً فِي أَرْضِ شِنْعَارَ فَاسْتَوْطَنُوا هُنَاكَ. فَقَالَ بَعْضُهُمْ لِبَعْضٍ: «هَيَّا نَصْنَعُ طُوباً مَشْوِيّاً أَحْسَنَ شَيٍّ». فَاسْتَبْدَلُوا الْحِجَارَةَ بِالطُّوبِ، وَالطِّينَ بِالزِّفْتِ

25 Egypt: Grade 1 whole-word reading “active learning” class ( without vowels children may identify entire words as particular shapes)

26 Urdu – multiple issues Urdu – multiple difficulties Few vowel signs even in grade 1 Vowels are not predictable as in Arabic Dots separated from the main body of letters Topological imprinting Need to learn the visual pattern of each word separately

27 Urdu, Farsi, Dari, Pashto

28 Devanāgarī alphabet for Hindi

29 African languages have regular spelling can be automatized in a few months Fluency to other languages transfers within the same script

30 English through, caught, bake, often, saw, sew French Ils etaient, oiseau, mois, etant Bengali jomi – earth boithak – meeting koThin - difficult Complex visual patterns in various languages and scripts (Psycholinguistic grains)

31 The brain‘s rules for recognizing object similarity Mozambique and Angola teach calligraphy early on. Calligraphic and printed letters cannot be seen as equivalent initially, only after extensive practice e= E =

32 Result: Students just “sketch” letters (Mozambique) The child tried to draw an O: “O sapo”

33

34 Some grade 1 textbooks don’t teach reading! Misguided belief that text interpretation will lead to recognition of letters (Mozambique)

35 Mozambique Grade 1 outside Nampula

36 When should students be able to read? OECD reading study of 16 countries Latin and Greek scripts Seymour et al Middle-class students Best-case scenario

37 But..the more complex the visual recognition or spelling the longer it takes to automatize Automatizing large visual patterns (psycholinguistic grains) – takes longer, may “trick” some brains students depend more on language knowledge And if they don’t know the language? (English, French, Portuguese, Urdu) Learning to read in a complex system without knowing the language is a job for geniuses! And if school time is also wasted? See test results all over Africa

38 Reading level after 1 year of instruction % correct Reading lists of words Seymour et al. (2003), British Journal of Psychology` German Austrian Finnish Spanish Greek Dutch Italian Danish Norwegian Swedish Icelandic Portuguese French English

39 Items per minute when reading word lists German Austrian Finnish Spanish Greek Dutch Italian Danish Norwegian Swedish Icelandic Portuguese French English r accuracy/speed =.87 Seymour et al. (2003), British Journal of Psychology

40 U.S. Oral Reading Fluency Norms connected text - Spring Hasbrouck and Tindal (2006) Grade50 th %ile 25 th %ile 10 th %ile “Oral Reading Fluency Norms: A Valuable Assessment Tool for Reading Teachers.” The Reading Teacher, 59, 2006

41 Without fluency and accuracy there is no comprehension (Peruvian data)

42 2002 NAEP fluency study, p. 30

43 Correct Words per Minute th Grade 7 th Grade 8 th Grade FWSFWSFWSFWSFWSFWS Correct Words per Minute on Grade Level Text WPM difference 22 WPM difference 23 WPM difference Tindal, Hasbrouck, & Jones, 2005 US students Text difficulty increases TorTor Fall, winter, spring Torgesen, 2006

44 Correct Words per Minute st Grade 2 nd Grade 3 rd Grade WSFWSFWSWSFWSFWS Correct Words per Minute on Grade Level Text Good, Wallin, Simmons, Kame’enui, & Kaminski, 2002 US students 45 WPM difference 33 WPM difference 27 WPM difference Torgesen, 2006 winter, spring, fall

45 New monitoring indicator from neurocognitive research 60 words per minute for all In just about every language and script: By the end of grade 1 students should “crack the code” By the end of grade 2 at the latest students should read common words fluently Students in grade 7 (1 st secondary year) should read about words per minute and give a summary of what they read

46 When visual patterns are complex, basic reading needs more time and money (psycholinguistic grain size theory) English reading takes 2.5 times longer to acquire over German, Turkish, Spanish (4 months or so needed) French and Portuguese also take longer. Indian languages – regular spelling, complex scripts High error rates in south Indian scripts Arabic – easy with vowels, difficult otherwise Perennially slower reading, high error rates Urdu, Persian problematic for the poor

47 35 words per minute

48 How children should read – Cuba grade 2

49 Reading fluently enough to understand? 60 wpm correctly? Rural Indonesia grade 2 simple spelling rules, good class time use Rural Niger – best 6 th grader, graduating in 3 weeks Study only in French, time use uncertain

50 Oral reading samples Mozambique A familia do meu melhor amigoOverage student end of grade 3 One of 2 students who could read fluently in the class 70 words per minute Periurban 5 th graders - Maputo

51 Students becoming fluent late may always read slowly have limited comprehension If they finally learn reading in grade 6 –They may read 70 wpm in grade 8 –They get no more books by grade 8 They will read little secondary school –university or teacher training colleges –They cannot read fast enough to consult sources –Or read volumes of text –At 110 words per minute, it takes 5 minutes per page

52 Can this 3 rd grader in Panama solve the problem he is reading?

53 How to teach complex scripts in 1-2 years to the poor? Lots of practice, build up letter recognition speed - phonics Automatize the common patterns that enable students to read most material Students in English learn the most common words Teach the more rare signs later E.g. postpone certain half-consonants of Indian languages (or use “halant”?) Keep Arabic, Urdu, Farsi voweled throughout primary school Keep the Arabic letters on a straight line Get children practice with feedback! E.g. read 1 minute a day with every child Textbooks to take home with much text for all Not just a few ‘generative words’ to bring from home

54 Teaching fluent reading to the poor takes more effort child and family characteristics predict initial reading skills Though not reading development over time. High percentage of poor students in a class is often associated with lower student reading performance after accounting for socioeconomic and instructional variables. How does this happen day to day in class? Kainz, Kirsten and Lynne Vernon-Feagans The ecology of early reading development for children in poverty. The elemenary school journal, 107,

55 Teach decoding strategy Analogies to automatize small units Brain takes this up well

56 Mozambican NGO Progresso “Eu leio”: Literacy through phonics

57 How not to teach?

58 Is it possible to learn reading or other skills as time is used in many countries?

59 Only a fraction of the countries’ investment is actually converted into learning time

60 Instructional time loss in a sample of countries

61 Grade-wise time use Teachers of lower grades spent more time on organization younger children - higher off-task rates, given a briefer attention span. Older grades - less reading aloud and drill, increase in lecturing and discussion Morocco: reading activities 17% of the time in grades 1 and 4, 2.5% in grade 5 (and 15.1% in grade 6, possibly to prepare for exams). Brazil: in grade 8 copying time increased because secondary students lack textbooks.

62 Percentage of Time Spent in Instructional Tasks

63 Examples of time loss Class starts late (Honduras, Brazil) Book distribution (Argentina, Honduras) Slow motion, limited activity (Niger-Tilabery) One student on the board – (Indonesia, Yemen) Copying – (Guinee) Secondary activities (Brazil, Argentina) Group interactions (Argentina, Brazil) Teachers doing other things – everyone off task (Brazil)

64 Conclusions How to educate the poor most efficiently?

65 Get results efficiently given time and money Explicit, systematic instruction for the poor and those who know less Use software for multiple repetitions that tire teachers practice to automatize “low-level” processes that the middle class takes for granted much feedback, extensive practice with books - phonics Use easily spelled African languages before reading English Speed and fluency in basic calculations Focus investments in grades 1-2 – before the students fall behind

66 We need much more and more specific research on various scripts Some syllabic scripts may not be viable in the long run as currently used and taught Arabic printing and vowel inclusion – for use by all Some scripts need to be reformed Which bodies are responsible in each case? Eg. South Indian scripts?

67 Suggested Monitoring Indicators Reading fluency and comprehension 60 words per minute for all by the end of grade 2 3 comprehension questions answered correctly words per minute by the end of grade 6 Summary of paragraph Math Indicators to develop to track both fluency and comprehension e.g. memorize multiplication tables by grade 3 Instructional time used for learning 80% goal

68 Controversies and concerns Educational philosophy vs. neurocognitive research outcomes How to disseminate the lines of reasoning? Philosophical debates – needed but they delay decisions Reading automaticity sounds too mechanistic to some How to monitor these ‘concrete’ benchmarks and learning outcomes early on Should the poor be taught differently from the middle class? How to undertake necessary research on memory effects in classroom?

69 Alternative measurements Wordchains Piloting needed for this paper-and-pencil predictor of reading fluency

70 We’d better hurry EFA is ending in 7 years Thank you for listening!

71 Extra slides


Download ppt "Early Reading Fluency: Rationale and Insights from cognitive neuroscience The view from the Independent Evaluation Group Helen Abadzi Independent Evaluation."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google