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1 This training is conducted by the National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi www.nfsmi.org 800-321-3054.

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Presentation on theme: "1 This training is conducted by the National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi www.nfsmi.org 800-321-3054."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 This training is conducted by the National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi

2 2 Healthy Cuisine for Kids Seminar Improving Culinary Skills in Child Nutrition Programs

3 3 “High quality, flavor, and attractiveness should be the keynotes of the child nutrition program food policy.” Mary de Garmo Bryan, in the 1936 textbook, The School Cafeteria

4 4 Welcome Introductions – Who are you? – Where are you from? – Why are you here? Write your name on a post-it note.

5 5 Purpose of the Healthy Cuisine for Kids Seminar Prepare and serve nutritious, high-quality meals that appeal to the customer. Promote healthy eating behaviors.

6 6 Seminar Objectives 1.Discuss how school meals support the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and follow federal guidance in preparing and serving nutritious, high- quality meals that appeal to the (student) customers. 2.Identify quality standards for fruits and vegetables, meats, whole- grain breads, meat alternates, and whole grains prepared in child nutrition programs.

7 7 Seminar Objectives, continued 3.Demonstrate an understanding of the nutrition principles related to preparing fruits and vegetables, meats, whole-grain breads, meat alternates, and whole grains. 4.Demonstrate basic culinary skills required to prepare and serve nutritious, high-quality meals that appeal to the (student) customers.

8 8 Expectations of HCK Seminar Participants Participate in HCK. Perform the assigned tasks. Practice the content presented. Participate effectively as a team member to – organize for each assignment in the laboratory. – prepare and evaluate the assigned food products. – prepare products to appear on the serving line, using garnishes and considering food placement. – present the products for tasting and evaluation.

9 9 Healthy Cuisine for Kids Seminar Lessons Lesson (1/2 day each) Schedule Culinary Basics Day 1 Fruits and Vegetables Day 1 Meats Day 2 Whole-Grain Breads Day 2 Meat AlternatesDay 3 Whole GrainsDay 3

10 10 The Three-Part Plan for Each Lesson 1.Classroom – a discussion of the nutrition contribution and requirement of the meal component to healthy meals 2.Culinary Demonstration – a demonstration of culinary practices that will be used in the culinary laboratory 3.Culinary Laboratory – a hands-on experience of working as a team to prepare, present, and evaluate food items

11 11 Materials Pre-seminar manual Participant manual Basics at a Glance poster Culinary manual

12 12 Culinary Basics Lesson One Healthy Cuisine for Kids

13 13 Culinary Basics Building a Nutrition Foundation Healthy school nutrition environment Dietary Guidelines for Americans Recommended Dietary Allowances Dietary Guidance School nutrition program standards and guidelines Fats, Carbohydrates, and Proteins Vitamins and Minerals

14 14 Culinary Basics Foundation in Culinary Techniques Function of fat, sugar, and salt in healthy cooking Standardized recipes Accurate weighing and measuring Mise en place

15 15 Culinary Basics, continued Basic preparation Healthy cooking methods Flavoring and seasoning Presentation and garnishing Evaluating food products

16 16 Objectives: Culinary Basics 1. Briefly describe how healthy cooking techniques help to create a healthy school nutrition environment. 2. State the child nutrition program standards for recommended levels of fat and sodium. 3. List the names of key nutrients required in school lunch menus at a specific level. 4. Briefly state how the dietary guidance materials are useful tools in planning and preparing school meals. - Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Recommended Dietary Allowances

17 17 Objectives: Culinary Basics, continued 5. Explain the importance of using standardized recipes and following correct procedures when preparing school meals. 6. Explain the function of fat, sugar, and salt in food preparation. 7. Explain the importance of flavor enhancers in preparing healthy and appealing foods. 8. Briefly discuss how accurate weighing and measuring and production schedules impact the quality and nutritional value of food.

18 18 Nutrition Focus

19 19 A Healthy School Nutrition Environment Gives Student Customers Clear and consistent messages that reinforce healthy eating and physical activity habits, Opportunities to learn to make healthy choices, and Opportunities to practice healthy habits.

20 20 A Healthy School Nutrition Environment Nutrition is related to well-being. Healthy eating habits need to start early. Unhealthy eating habits lead to health problems. Some children are undernourished. Some children have problems with over-nutrition. Expenses associated with nutritional problems are over $71 billion a year.

21 21 Six Steps to Healthy Cooking Food must be … purchased by specification number, received correctly and stored properly, handled safely, prepared using healthy cooking techniques, served in a healthy and appealing manner, and served in a safe and attractive dining area.

22 22 Dietary Guidelines for Americans The national nutrition policy is reviewed and updated every five years.

23 23 It’s the Law! The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act as amended in 1994 states: “Schools participating in the school lunch or school breakfast programs shall serve lunches and breakfasts under the program that are consistent with the Guidelines.”

24 24 Key Messages Dietary Guidelines for Americans 1.Consume a variety of foods within and among the basic food groups while staying within energy needs. 2.Control calorie intake to manage body weight. 3.Be physically active every day. 4.Increase daily intake of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nonfat or lowfat milk and milk products.

25 25 Key Messages Dietary Guidelines for Americans, continued 5.Choose fats wisely for good health. 6.Choose carbohydrates wisely for good health. 7.Choose and prepare foods with little salt. 8.If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation. 9.Keep foods safe to eat.

26 26 Dietary Guidelines for Child Nutrition Programs Offer a variety of foods within each of the food groups. Serve meals that help maintain a healthy body weight. Promote the need for physical activity every day. Serve plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products. Serve a variety of nonfat and lowfat milk and milk products.

27 27 Dietary Guidelines for Child Nutrition Programs, continued Offer meals low in fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and trans fat. Select foods with natural sweeteners and use sugars only in moderation. Choose and prepare foods with little salt. Promote an alcohol and drug-free lifestyle. Practice safe food handling from receiving through clean up.

28 28 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits Vegetables Grains Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

29 29 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits carbohydrates, fiber, potassium, folate, vitamin A, and vitamin C Vegetables Grains Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

30 30 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits Vegetables complex carbohydrates, fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, potassium, iron, magnesium, and vitamin E Grains Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

31 31 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits Vegetables Grains complex carbohydrates, fiber, riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, folate, iron, and vitamin E (whole grains) Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

32 32 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits Vegetables Grains Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese protein, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, and vitamin B12 Note : Foods in this group contain fat, trans fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol. Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

33 33 The Food Groups Provide Important Nutrients Food GroupNutrients Provided Fruits Vegetables Grains Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts protein, iron, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin E Note : Meat, poultry, fish, and eggs may contain saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol.

34 34 Calories What is a calorie? Why do calories count? Where do calories come from? – Fat – Protein – Carbohydrates – Alcohol

35 35 Sight Customers eat with their eyes first. The food must look good to be acceptable. Smell Good food has a pleasing aroma. Touch How it feels in the mouth. Taste Food flavors should appeal to students’ taste. Sound The crunch of celery or a fresh apple helps to whet the appetite. Getting Customer Acceptance

36 36 Ideas for Getting Customer Acceptance Introduce new foods – gradually along with old favorites for greater acceptance. – by offering a small taste with the meal. Provide a high-quality, nutritious product. Observe, ask, and listen to customers. Create a dining experience. Understand and respect differences among students.

37 37 Standardized Recipes A standardized recipe is one that has been tried, adapted, and retried several times for use by a given food service operation and has been found to produce the same food results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used, with the same type of equipment, and the same quantity and quality of ingredients. Source: A Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals (1998). USDA.

38 38 Why Use A Standardized Recipe? Quality Control Portion Control No Substitutions Cost Control Time Savings Inventory Control Consistent Results

39 39 Parts of a Standardized Recipe Recipe Title Recipe Category Ingredients Weight/Volume of Each Ingredient Variations Critical Control Points

40 40 Parts of a Standardized Recipe, continued Preparation Instructions Cooking Temperatures and Times Serving Size Recipe Yield Equipment and Utensils to be Used Marketing Guide for Selected Ingredients Nutrients per Serving

41 41 Steps in Using a Recipe 1.Study the recipe carefully. 2.Understand terms and definitions. 3.Ask questions to clarify information. 4.Check the yield, temperature, and cooking time. 5.Assemble in order of use – tools, utensils, and equipment.

42 42 Steps in Using a Recipe, continued 6.Assemble ingredients. 7.Do pre-preparation – grease pans, wash and cut fruits/vegetables, preheat oven, and measure and weigh ingredients. 8.Follow the recipe exactly. 9.Cook for the time and at the temperature stated in the recipe or procedure.

43 43 Measuring Tools Measuring Spoons Liquid Measuring Containers Dry Measuring Containers Scales

44 44 Measuring Spoons Used for measuring small quantities Available in a variety of styles 1/4 teaspoon 1/3 teaspoon 1/2 teaspoon 1 teaspoon 1 Tablespoon

45 45 Ounce to Gallon Conversion Fluid ounces Cup8 ounces Pint16 ounces2 cups Quart32 ounces4 cups2 pounds Gallon128 ounces4 quarts8 pounds

46 46 Common Conversions 3 teaspoons = 1 Tablespoon 2 Tablespoons = 1 fluid ounce 2 Tablespoons = 1/8 cup 4 Tablespoons = 1/4 cup 5 1/3 Tablespoons= 1/3 cup

47 47 Common Conversions, continued 8 Tablespoons = 1/2 cup 10 2/3 Tablespoons= 2/3 cup 12 Tablespoons = 3/4 cup 16 Tablespoons = 1 cup

48 48 Common Conversions, continued 8 fluid ounces= 1 cup 2 cups= 1 pint 4 cups= 1 quart 4 quarts= 1 gallon

49 49 Liquid Measuring Containers

50 50 Liquid Measuring Containers, continued Available in metal and plastic Plastic containers have graduations on both sides; more accurate for liquid measuring Available in a variety of sizes

51 51 Dry Measuring Containers Usually metal for durability Flat top edge for leveling contents

52 52 Weighing Tools Balance Scales Spring Scales Electronic Scales

53 53 Balance Scales Balances product weight against lead weights Requires several sizes of lead weights for co-balance Edlund Company™

54 54 Spring Scales Come in a variety of sizes Dial may be fixed or adjustable Pointer should be set to zero before using Edlund Company™

55 55 Electronic Scales Digital read out Units of measure changed easily by flipping switch Should be reset after each measurement AJ Antunes & Company™

56 56 Portion Control Tools Scoops/Dishers/Dippers Spoodles Ladles Spoons

57 57 Scoops/Dishers/Dippers Often are color-coded Range in size from 6 to 100 Size = number of level scoops per quart Size on blade or handle

58 58 Spoodles Combination spoon and ladle Available in sizes from 2 ounces to 8 ounces May be solid or perforated

59 59 Ladles Available in sizes from 2 ounces to 8 ounces Good for soups, sauces, creamed foods, or other similar foods

60 60 Serving Spoons Least accurate portion tool Good for serving pre- portioned items May be solid, slotted, or perforated Are not identified by a number

61 61 Basic Kitchen Skills Desirable work habits Ability to organize the work to be done - Mise en place Correct use of standardized recipes, weights, and measures Proper use of equipment Strict adherence to rules of food safety and sanitation

62 62 Commodities Fresh fruits – apples, oranges, pears Frozen fruits – apples Dry fruits – cherries, raisins Fresh vegetables – sweet potatoes, potatoes Frozen vegetables – beans, carrots, peas Beans – black, garbanzo, great northern, pinto

63 63 Commodities, continued Cheese – reduced-fat cheddar Grains – oats, whole-wheat flour, corn grits, brown rice, whole-grain pasta Meats – tuna, pork leg roast, ground beef Other – Sunflower butter

64 64 National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi Mission: To provide information and services that promote the continuous improvement of child nutrition programs Vision: To be the leader in providing education, research, and resources to promote excellence in child nutrition programs


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