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What best describes the doctor in You? How would you like to be known 5 years from now ? What do you need to do to get there ?

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Presentation on theme: "What best describes the doctor in You? How would you like to be known 5 years from now ? What do you need to do to get there ?"— Presentation transcript:

1 What best describes the doctor in You? How would you like to be known 5 years from now ? What do you need to do to get there ?

2 Where Am I ? Customer Satisfact- ion Customer Service Customer Delight

3 The truth about Customers…  On an average, for each customer who complains there are 26 who feel the same way and don’t speak up.  Customers relate to people…not organizations  The customers who feel poorly served will tell between 8 and 16 people about their negative experience.  Customers are lost primarily due to indifference and not dissatisfaction People talk about Bad Service People talk about Customer Delight People don’t talk about Adequate Service

4  Customer expectations are typically not very high  Your job is to Surprise them  Customer Delight is doing what they haven’t even imagined  What will cause them to say WOW!  You know what you can do, they don’t !!! What should we be doing? Actually… To stand out in the crowd To create a life changing experience To create stories about us To create Patient Delight !!!

5 Patient Empathy- The Differentiator You do not merely want to be considered the best of the best…. You want to be considered the only one who does what you do !!!

6 How our patients see us… The Doctor is held in high regard by patients –A heroic figure, who is my ally in fighting against my diabetes, –My Dr continues to deliver despite being under significant time pressures The Doctor is the primary information source –Most authoritative, most credible, best person to consult BUT Doctors are time poor and can only provide limited consultation time BUT Doctors do not treat me as an individual BUT Doctors can be judgemental

7 “I trust my doctor, I depend on him, he is professional, he takes responsibility for my health, however, he does not always have time to discuss with me.”  Only one in four see their physicians once a month or more often while majority of three in four see their physicians about once in two months or less frequently.  One in five respondents see their physicians for less than ten minutes at each consultation on average, some as short as two or three minutes.  Only one in ten respondents get to see their physicians for at least 20 minutes on average. COUNTRY TYPE OF HCP CONSULTED VISITS DOCTOR ONCE A MONTH OR MORE VISITS DOCTOR LESS THAN ONCE A MONTH AVERAGE CONSULTATION TIME India GP – 5 in 6 Specialist – 1 in 6 1 in 43 in 4 20mins: 1 in 10 What do they feel…

8  Education gives knowledge and awareness so that the expected behavioral change is well-understood.  Counseling is preparing the mind to be open to receive a new belief. EducationCounseling Meaning of a diagnosisAccepting the diagnosis How can it be managedHow you can manage it Why take treatment How treatment can make you feel better Do’s and don’ts for the family Enabling open communication between patient & family “This is what you need to do”“You can do it!” Treat the ‘Person’ with the ‘Disease’

9 1. “I don’t want others to know I have diabetes” 2. “Diabetes can be a very lonely world for me” 3. “Treat me like an individual, not a patient” 4. “I can never switch off” 5. “I want to be in control of my diabetes, not the other way round” Voices of Patients- Exercise

10 There is a perceived stigma about diabetes due to the association with diet, in particular sugar, and sedentary lifestyle. –many people believe that diabetes is in some ways a self inflicted condition and patients only have themselves to blame. The general public has a poor understanding of diabetes –If people know that you are a diabetic patient you are likely to have an awkward, frustrating conversation. Patients are quizzed on what they can and cannot eat/ drink, how diabetes affects their lives and how it is treated. This lack of understanding can also manifest itself in negative ways. Some patients prefer not to make it known they are diabetic in case it harms their career. Diabetics do not want to be thought of as being different or special. –If its known you are a diabetic people stop thinking of you as just another person and start seeing you as an invalid. –Diabetic patients think of themselves as a person who happens to suffer from diabetes not simply as a diabetic. Voices of the patients: I don’t want others to know I have diabetes Is the above Good to Know or Need to Know ?

11 Diabetes sufferers do not want to be a burden on their family members, nor do they want to worry them. As such, they tend to bottle up their emotions leading to a sense of isolation. The doctor is too busy, friends and family don’t understand them, they don’t want to be a burden to those close to them. However there was also a reluctance to attend meetings and seminars because patients do not want to be in a roomful of sick people, listening to other people complain. Therefore although they are lonely there is a reluctance to reach out and connect with others Voices of the patients: Diabetes can be a very lonely world for me Treat me like an individual, not a patient Patients feel that they are losing part of their identity. –Doctors have such limited time they tend to treat the individual as just one more insulin patient. –Education materials are too generalized to be of much use. –Some of the respondent have been living with diabetes for more than 10 years therefore they do not want to go to a seminar for recently diagnosed patients There is a sense of frustration amongst the patients interviewed that doctors and the healthcare industry treats them as just another diabetic. There is a desire to be treated as an individual

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13 Insulinised diabetes patients can never forget they have this condition. –Eating the wrong thing, forgetting an injection, switching off for a moment can have enormous consequences. –They are constantly asked by family members whether they have had their shot or what their blood glucose levels are The constant need to be vigilant acts as a constant strain for the patient. –This constant strain can lead to mood swings, anxiety, depression and patients can be short tempered with their family members Therefore living with diabetes is not just about injecting and watching your diet there is also the psychological pressure. Voices of the patients: I can never switch off Voices of the patients: I want to be in control of my Diabetes, not my disease in control of me Patients would like to know what exactly they can do –They want to learn from others who have had similar experiences. –They want to hear that, with careful management, it is possible to lead a full and rewarding life in spite of diabetes Is the above Good to Know or Need to Know ?

14 Where do I want to be ? Patient Satisfact- ion Patient Service Patient Delight

15 1.Rapport-building 2.Identifying counseling goals 3.Assessment of patient’s level of coping 4.Patient typing 5.Practical considerations 6.Counseling intervention Steps in Counseling

16 WHYHOW TO DO IT  Important – but often overlooked  Aims to build a trust relationship  patient feels free to confide in you  Listen and respond – do not do all the talking Ask the patient about themselves (open ended questions):  Where do you come from?  What work do you do?  Tell me about your family Choose a quiet place Body language, smile, eye contact are important 1. Rapport building* History Taking 1. How are you? 2.How is your health? 3. Is treatment helping you? 4. Are you facing any problem? 5. How can I help you ?

17  Help patients and families accept the diagnosis  Help equip them with information on disease management  Help develop a positive and pro-active approach  Help initiate and maintain life-style modifications  Help compliance to desired treatment  Cope with morbidity of complications  Socio-economic support to enable treatment 2. Identifying Counseling Goals Presenting problem

18 Different patients cope differently when faced with diabetes. Hence, assessment of the coping level of the patient is Important to decide on the counseling approach. A patient’s level of coping may vary at different points of the disease and treatment. S tage P revious Knowledge A ge S ES S ex Family/Peer S upport Staging of disease 3. Assessment of patient’s level of coping

19 + ve effect on coping - ve effect on coping StagePrevious Knowledge Age SexSESFamily/Peer support Coping Map…

20 Assessment of Level of Coping (Table 2b)Counselling Focus As disease progresses  patient begins to lose hope “What were you told earlier about the disease?” Early stage: -Build hope in the patient -Help him develop positive approach to treatment. Progressive stage: -Filter information -Keep care giver informed -Build positive picture to the patient AgeSex Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus 1Stage As disease progresses  patient begins to lose hope “What were you told earlier about the disease?” Early stage: -Build hope in the patient -Help him develop positive approach to treatment. Progressive stage: -Filter information -Keep care giver informed -Build positive picture to the patient [i1] And instead of /[i1] [i2] Look for myths/misconceptions[i2] [i3] The guilt also arises because they are not able to take care of their family due to the illness.[i3] [i4] who does not have family/peer support[i4] Stage…and its possible impact

21 Previous Knowledge… and its possible impact Assessment of Level of Coping (Table 2b)Counselling Focus As disease progresses  patient begins to lose hope “What were you told earlier about the disease?” Early stage: -Build hope in the patient -Help him develop positive approach to treatment. Progressive stage: -Filter information -Keep care giver informed -Build positive picture to the patient AgeSex Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus [i1] And instead of /[i1] [i2] Look for myths/misconceptions[i2] [i3] The guilt also arises because they are not able to take care of their family due to the illness.[i3] [i4] who does not have family/peer support[i4] 2Previous knowledge of disease A. The amount and quality of the information B. Previous experience with the disease Evaluate what the patient knows about Diabetes Any myths / misconceptions? Fill in the gaps in knowledge in a non- threatening way

22 Age…and its possible impact Assessment of Level of Coping (Table 2b)Counselling Focus As disease progresses  patient begins to lose hope “What were you told earlier about the disease?” Early stage: -Build hope in the patient -Help him develop positive approach to treatment. Progressive stage: -Filter information -Keep care giver informed -Build positive picture to the patient AgeSex Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus 3Age  Related to family support and economic status  May have +/- ve effect on coping  Middle aged person + good family support + means to take Rx  copes well  Breadwinner – disease may affect income generation  may cope badly  Elderly – often fatalistic  usually accept the disease easily except in the absence of family &/or financial support  Map the patient: age, stage of disease, previous knowledge, socioeconomic status & family support  This helps to recognize where the patient needs help

23 Sex…and its possible impact Men and women could be affected differently. Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus 4Sex  Men: Disease seems to take away a sense of control  dependency  anger, irritability  some may mask fear by denial  Women: Often feel guilty because of extra financial burden on the family.  Men: How to bring back the control  Women: Value of self- care  Both: Good self management will ultimately benefit themselves and their families

24 SES…and its possible impact Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus 5Socio- economic status Has direct effect on coping because of the cost of Rx and loss of income due to the disease In India, This burden is felt across socio- economic strata  Assess the pt’s need  Ensure provision of affordable Rx options  Advise means of seeking financial assistance where necessary  Emphasize that timely & regular Rx will save long term costs

25 Fly/Peer Support… and its possible impact Assessment of Level of CopingCounseling Focus 6Family / peer support Patient with good support system will cope much better than the patient who is considered a burden by his family For patients with little /no family support, Counselor needs to support the patient while gradually helping him to become independent, self- reliant and confident.

26 To assess the overall coping level by seeing how each of these positively or negatively affects coping. Mrs. S knows she has an early stage disease which can be controlled. However, she is very fearful of treatment which she has heard is very painful. She is young, has a good socio-economic support so can afford the treatment, and has a very caring husband. Coping Map…

27 + ve effect on coping - ve effect on coping StagePrevious Knowledge Age SexSESFamily/Peer support Therefore, the counseling will focus on Clearing her myths about treatment, Importance of timely treatment since it is an early stage disease and Emphasizing on her age and favorable prognosis Family support & responsibility towards them Coping Map…

28  The Pro-Active patient  The Skeptical patient  The Overconfident patient  The Resigned patient  The Casual patient 4. Patient typing *

29 CharacteristicsAttitude to DiabetesAttitude to Controlling Diabetes  Knows severity of the disease  Independent & curious by nature  Motivated for self-care  Well informed “I will keep my Diabetes under control” “I have a serious problem, but it is not the end of the world – I just have to make adjustments” “This will actually help me discipline my life” -Fully involved -Optimistic -Regular for follow-up -Follows dietary restrictions -Takes drugs regularly and on time -Exercises regularly The Pro-Active patient

30 CharacteristicsAttitude to DiabetesAttitude to Controlling Diabetes The Skeptical patient  Wants good results with low inputs  Low awareness  Lives for today – short term benefits more important than long term benefits  Looks for low- effort, convenient options “This can wait – I have other things to do” – postpones treatment “I do not want to take Insulin” – looks for alternate drugs / home remedies even though insulin is essential. “Doctor, can you tell me when I can stop treatment?” -Average involvement -Irregular for follow- up -Lenient in following dietary restrictions -Comfortable with OHA; avoids Insulin -Exercises sporadically; tends to give excuses

31 CharacteristicsAttitude to DiabetesAttitude to Controlling Diabetes The Over-confident patient  Low awareness – claims that he knows it all  Self-medication  Relies on friends & relatives for advice rather than on his doctor  Stubborn  Lifestyle changes inconsistent “This is not serious – I can manage” “This drug has not worked – let me try that other drug” – tends to experiment “I won’t see the doctor this month – I am doing okay!” -Needs flexibility in routine – prefers not to be bound by fixed dietary regimen -Does not feel the need for follow-up with the doctor after initial diagnosis and prescription -Likes to choose his medications

32 CharacteristicsAttitude to DiabetesAttitude to Controlling Diabetes The Resigned patient  Fear drives him to treatment – “Diabetes will kill me silently”  Curses fate “Why me?”  Poorly aware – does not seek to know better  Lacks self confidence  Depends on others  Goes by the rules “This disease will affect my whole life and will finally kill me” “There is no cure – I just have to obey the Doctor’s orders” “I cannot enjoy my life anymore” “I must somehow save myself from coma, heart attack and blindness” -Mechanically follows instructions -“Doctor’s exercise routine” -“Doctor’s medication” -“Doctor visits” -“Doctor’s diet orders”

33 CharacteristicsAttitude to DiabetesAttitude to Controlling Diabetes The Casual patient  Not bothered about self care, health or diabetes  No drive to know more  “Fate brought this disease – let fate take care of me”  Everything else is more important than self or diabetes  Defeatist attitude “This disease is nothing serious – it can be controlled easily!” “I know I need to exercise control” – but unwilling to practise it “I don’t need a regimen to tackle my problem” “I am feeling tired today – I must remember to take my drugs” “Treatment of Diabetes is too costly for me – it is not worth the expense” -Does not practise control regularly -Escapist attitude – gives lame excuses -Health is last priority -Treatment of Diabetes is for getting rid of symptoms and to keep his family happy – not for self

34 Time per patient Duration of association Information-sharing: how much is too much ? 5. Practical considerations

35 Doses/ Cycles Therapy Options 6. Counseling Intervention

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37 This model states that people calculate ‘return on investment’ based on own perceptions.Factors considered important in healthcare decisions [Richards 1997] Perceived severity Perceived susceptibility Value of the treatment Cost of treatment – physical and emotional Health Belief Model Models of Behavior Change

38 Correlation of Health Beliefs with Patient Types Patient Type Perceived Severity Perceived Susceptibility Value of treatment / life- style modifications Cost (Tangible / Intangible) Pro-active patient High Low Skeptical patient High Low (Seeks immediate answers) High (unless results are immediate) Overconfiden t patient Unsure (pretends otherwise) LowHigh Resigned patient High High (Anxiousness negatively affects approach to Rx) Low (Will do anything to take diabetes away) Casual patient Unsure High

39 This model states that that our job is not to make people change, but to provide information, inspiration and support that will enable them to make the changes of their own choosing. Identify the problem Explore feelings Set goals Make a plan Evaluate the results Empowerment Model Models of Behavior change

40  Identify the problem: from the person’s perspective, ask questions which help the person to obtain clarity, ask questions that will help people to identify a solution.  Explore feelings: Feelings are not problems to be solved. Ask people to describe their thoughts.  Set goals : help people to decide on their objectives, find out people’s level of commitment  Make a plan: help people to identify one action towards their goal. A plan should be: Realistic, Completely within their control, Measurable and Personally meaningful Exercise: “Bring your sugar level in control ”  Evaluate the results: encourage people with diabetes to think of these steps in terms of experiments rather than successes or failures Key points…

41 HEALTH - BELIEF MODEL EMPOWERMENT MODEL Basic Principle: In this model, people’s beliefs are the key factors; people calculate ‘return on investment’ based on own perceptions According to this model, we need to acknowledge that our job is not to make people change, but to provide information, inspiration and support that will enable them to make the changes of their own choosing. Suggested for: Initiating desired behavior change Maintaining behavior change Intervention through: Assessment and Addressal of: Perceived severity Perceived susceptibility Value of the treatment Barriers to treatment Cost of treatment – physical and emotional Self-directed goal setting:  Identify the problem  Explore feelings  Set goals  Make a plan  Evaluate the results In summary…

42 Condition WHY?Limited understanding of the condition, what it entails, why it happened, and that it is manageable Addressing this knowledge gap can help patients feel more confident in managing the condition and less depressed about the state of their health “All knowledge and information that I have gathered so far, I would like to include so that everyone can know and learn how to maintain their diet and maintain their daily routines and meet their normal life.” What?Cure- what the next big thing? Cause – is it hereditary? Symptoms of deterioration Complications – feet, liver, kidneys Prevention “Everybody says that it is hereditary so I used to feel so bad about it. My daughter is very healthy now, I don’t worry for myself now the concern is more towards her, I don’t want her to be suffer from this disease.” When? At first diagnosis How?Seminars/lectures Face to face Consultative element Needs to be supported/managed by medical professionals “Seminars should be arranged because people will attend the seminars.” “There should be patient and doctor interaction and what questions we ask they should tell, like the food and diet and insulin and what are the problems that we may face after some time, if there are new medicine they should tell.” What patients would like to know: If I can Understand Diabetes I am Better Prepared to Control it Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

43 Medication WHY?Limited understanding of the medication used and how to administer it Addressing this knowledge gap can help better manage their medication and improve quality of life “I will ask the way to destroy diabetes and what are the bad effects we face from diabetes and new medicines. I want to ask about the eyes and kidneys.” What?Pharmacology of medicine Guidance on how to take medication – dosing, what to do when missed, how to inject Side effects Length of treatment Other types of medication available – better ones, oral options (insulin), differences “Different people have different medication and body type is also different.” “How long I have to take insulin?” When? At first diagnosis On going – for new and existing diabetic patients 24/7, easy access (especially for emergencies) “Only when people who are suffering from diabetes.” “Emergency and during weekends.” How?Seminars/lectures Telephone/Call centres Needs to be supported/managed by medical professionals “We need call centers and doctors to be there so that we can get immediate response.” What patients would like to know: Understanding my Medication will help me be more Compliant Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

44 Innovations WHY?Want to keep abreast of developments, search for alternative treatments Desire to stop medication, especially insulin Developments in medical sciences and alternative therapies give a sense of hope “Tell us about new medicines and new developments.” “Any new medicine to fully cure diabetes?” What? New treatments available Other treatments – e.g. stem cell transplant, surgery Latest research trials “I would ask about pancreas secreting insulin again and if there is there any new technology to transplant the pancreas” “Medicine and new ones – people should tell me about it.” When? On going – for new and existing diabetic patients Convenient, at patient’s leisure How?Telephones Face to face“Telephones are very necessary. “ What patients would like to know: Understanding Treatment Innovations helps me stay positive Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

45 Day to Day Management WHY?Need to have a better understanding of what they can do, what they can eat, why blood glucose level fluctuates, and how to deal with complications Improving knowledge on these areas will help patients have better control over their condition “It will have information on food (diet to be eaten), exercise, and managing stress.” “My father use to say without eating food we will die and after eating food also we will die, then I prefer a death with food.” What?Food/Diet Exercise Blood glucose control and monitoring How to deal with hypoglycaemia How to treat/prevent infections/wounds “Recently I know that you should avoid the potassium rich food because over a period of time it might affect your kidney.” “Why my sugar level not going down?” “How to avoid hypo?” When? At first diagnosis On going – for new and existing patients How?Seminars/lectures Telephone Needs to be personalised, each patient is different “There should be call centers and they should be able to tell what kind of food we should take and how to control everything.” What patients would like to know: How can I Improve my Day-to-Day Management? Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

46 Emergency & Peripheral Support WHY?Need access to advice in times of emergency Assistance with getting medical attention Assistance in times of need will help patients in the management of their disease “We need call centers and doctors to be there so that we can get immediate response” if there is a call center and a specialist doctor ready to attend us then it would be really good. In emergencies we can call, we can avoid so many problems. We can ask many questions when there is an emergency, if I eat more sweets that day, if there is new service its will be good.” What?Questions on medicine – what to do when missed a dose What to do when there experiencing hypoglycaemia Transportation (to hospitals When? On going – for new and existing diabetic patients How?Telephone/Call centres (for emergencies) Home care service“Telephones are very necessary…for emergency and in general holidays.” What patients would like to know: Where do I turn to for emergency & peripheral support? Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

47 Financial Support WHY?Diabetes is a long term disease and medication is expensive Helping lower income patients with their financial difficulties will help to reduce some of the anxiety they experience with having this condition “At the age of 35 I am suffering for sugar, which is very costly and painful. Will it cure permanently?” “It’s a serious disease and incurred huge cost.” What? Cost of medications Cost of tests“It would be good if they can get free medicine, free treatment.” When?At first diagnosis On-going – for lower income patients/those with financial difficulties How?Free medication Better insurance coverage – to include blood glucose tests “The patient support programme should help patients get free medicine, free treatment.” What patients would like to know: Where do I turn to for financial support? Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

48 Mental Well-Being WHY?Need to relieve stress and improve psychological well-being Increased information on condition, medication and management from onset will better equip and reassure patients that this is manageable, and reduce the stress and anxiety associated with diabetes “Its very stressful because of my age.” “If we can control diabetes then we can live happily.” What?Stress/mood management Reduce fear associated with having diabetes Develop and maintain positive thinking Learn from others, and not feel alone “Why do I feel so anxious? How can I best manage the way I feel? It would be good if there are other patients to discuss with also?” When? At first diagnosis On going – for new and existing diabetic patients How?Social groups Telephone Public education on diabetes “A phone facility to call and discuss with any doctor and other patient.” “It is a social stigma also.” What patients would like to know: Emotional Needs – Mental Well-Being Customize to patient: Coping level and Patient type

49 Counseling care-givers… Elements of condition Causes of diabetes Treating condition with medication Coping strategies to minimize the impact Avoid complications Able to find information Support a patient in self- management Four in five caregivers feel they don’t know enough Three in five feel they don’t know enough Four in five caregivers feel they know enough Three in five feel they don’t know enough Three in five caregivers feel they don’t know enough Three in five caregivers feel they know enough Reasons Caregivers are concerned about how to help patients, not why they got the disease Physician is the only source, and sometimes difficult to understand Physicians explained clearly. Caregivers feel they know enough just to follow instructions Physician’s information is not well enough Discuss with doctors not really sure where to find Have been a caregiver for years. Quotes “I am not interested why he got his diabetes, but how can I help him to control the disease” “I just receive some advice from the doctors, but I don’t really understand.” “Physician explained to me what and how should I do clearly, I feel I can just follow his instructions.” “Physician just told us to avoid complications, but didn’t tell me how to do.” “If I have any questions, I would just go asking the doctors, I don’t really know other sources” “I took care of him for 8 years, I feel much more experienced now, I believe I could do a good job.” How much do caregivers know? Many caregivers feel they do not know enough about diabetes management

50 Basic Health Education- to equip them with information related to managing the patient with regard to treatment Individual case-work for ‘care-giver stress’- Caring for their loved ones can make caregivers forget themselves. They feel guilty if they leave the patient unattended, they stop going out due to social pressure, and this leads to burnout or ‘care-giver stress’. This also brings in feelings of guilt in the patient. Therefore, counseling on the importance of self-care is a must. Family therapy- involves opening up communication channels between patients and their families. Counseling care-givers…

51 Where do I want to be? Patient Satisfact- ion Patient Service Patient Delight

52 First Interaction Entry into System Subsequent Interactions Proactive or Reactive Patient Delight Moments Of Truth Moments of Truth*

53 Patient Empathy- The Differentiator You do not merely want to be considered the best of the best…. You want to be considered the only one who does what you do !!!

54 Thank You 1.How did you find this session ? 2.One thing you will try to do differently going forward


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