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Jennifer A. Rechichi Bureau of Quality Improvement Office of Program Accountability Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Motivational Interviewing: A.

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Presentation on theme: "Jennifer A. Rechichi Bureau of Quality Improvement Office of Program Accountability Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Motivational Interviewing: A."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jennifer A. Rechichi Bureau of Quality Improvement Office of Program Accountability Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Motivational Interviewing: A Best Practice

2 Principles of Effective Intervention Risk Principle: Target high-risk offenders. Need Principle: Treat risk factors associated with offending behavior. Treatment Principle: Employ evidence-based delinquency interventions and treatment approaches. Responsivity Principle: Tailor treatments to meet unique needs/risk factors of the individual. Fidelity Principle: Monitor implementation quality and treatment fidelity.

3 Responsivity and Protective Factors Responsivity: Factors within individuals or the environment that do not predict re-offending, but constitute ‘roadblocks’ to treatment. Protective: Factors that decrease the effects of risk factors and increase the likelihood of desistance.

4 Types of Responsivity General (External Factors) Most successful programs are based in cognitive behavioral and/or social learning approaches. Utilize techniques that allow for individualized learning of offenders (i.e., role playing, skill-building, role modeling) Specific (Internal Factors) Assumes that certain personal characteristics may interfere with treatment Interventions will be more effective when tailored to the needs of the individual

5 Specific Responsivity Lack of motivation Anxiety Cultural background Learning Style Reading and comprehension levels Age (developmental, I.e., cognitive maturity and chronological) Gender IQ

6 “Different strokes for different folks” How ready is this person to change this behavior? Why might this person want to change this behavior? What kind of interaction will be most effective with this person? (Taxman, Shepardson, and Byrne, Tools of the Trade: A Guide to Incorporating Science into Practice. Available at

7 Motivation… Predicts action Is behavior specific Is changeable Is interactive Can be affected by both internal and external factors, but internally motivated change usually last longer

8 Motivational Interviewing is the foundation for working with offender responsivity. It suggests questions and statements that make it more likely that offenders will think, talk, and act in a positive direction.

9 What is Motivational Interviewing? It is a client-centered directive approach Emphasizes listening Facilitates change by: Raising discrepancy, Reducing levels of resistance, Amplifying ambivalence, Supporting self-efficacy, and Increasing positive change talk (this is the best predictor of long-lasting change)!

10 Think about a person who may have been a significant influence in your life that you have known personally (mentors, coaches, and supervisors work well). Who was this person that motivated you to learn, inspired you to excel and try harder than you otherwise would have? What is his/her name? What characteristics did he/she have? How did this person inspire you to be your best? How did you respond to his/her efforts/inspiration?

11 3 Characteristics of the Motivational Interviewing Spirit Collaboration: the tendency to work in harmony with others to solve a problem, address and issue, pursue an idea. Each person may have separate roles, but the process is supportive.

12 3 Characteristics of the Motivational Interviewing Spirit Autonomy: recognizes the ability and need of the other to choose his/her course, and it reflects faith in the ability of the other to choose wisely (doesn’t force you to follow a specific path, allows you to choose your own way and expresses faith that you will choose a good one).

13 3 Characteristics of the Motivational Interviewing Spirit Evocation: the action of one party bringing out the best in the other. The other is not left to flounder, but is given just enough direction to succeed.

14 The Department has identified Motivational Interviewing as a Best Practice. While its dosage cannot be measured, it is imperative that the concepts and techniques in which participants are trained remain consistent. The DJJ Basics of Motivational Interviewing and the Stages of Change Curriculum (2008) was developed to ensure that every DJJ employee and provider staff member who participates in Motivational Interviewing (MI) training is receiving the same information, through the use of a standardized curriculum and DJJ MI Qualified Trainers. Program integrity and fidelity are enhanced when the curriculum offered is standardized. The DJJ Basics of MI and the Stages of Change Curriculum (2008) is designed to be delivered only by MI Qualified Trainers.

15 The DJJ Basics of MI and the Stages of Change Curriculum (2008) is delivered over two days and involves lecture, role-playing, group activities and individual readings. There are three segments to this training: 1. A description of the population of youth served by DJJ; 2. The evidence-based interventions and best practices found to be effective with this population; and 3. The Stages of Change, and MI techniques used to help youth progress through the stages.

16 The DJJ Basics of MI and the Stages of Change Curriculum (2008) makes the use of Motivational Interviewing relevant to juvenile justice staff by including information on: The Human Continuum (of crime); The Rewards of Criminal Thinking; and Static Risk Factors and Dynamic Criminogenic Needs. Additionally, the DJJ Basics of MI and the Stages of Change Curriculum (2008), incorporates information, tools and techniques from Motivational Interviewing, 2 nd Edition by Miller and Rollnick, to assist staff in Implementing the concepts of MI in their daily interactions with youth. Specifically, the sections on Change-Talk and the IQLDG, FRAMES were added along with the information on the Characteristics of Delinquents previously mentioned.

17 3 Characteristics of the Motivational Interviewing Spirit Collaboration Reflection Evocation

18 Rating samples for MI Spirit 1. Thumbs Down 2. Thumbs Up 3. Thumbs Up 4. Thumbs Up 5. Thumbs Down 6. Thumbs Up 7. Thumbs Down 8. Thumbs Down 9. Thumbs Down


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