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An Introduction to Promise Scholarship Programs Michelle Miller-Adams, Research Fellow W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research October 11, 2013 Presentation.

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Presentation on theme: "An Introduction to Promise Scholarship Programs Michelle Miller-Adams, Research Fellow W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research October 11, 2013 Presentation."— Presentation transcript:

1 An Introduction to Promise Scholarship Programs Michelle Miller-Adams, Research Fellow W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research October 11, 2013 Presentation at Lumina Foundation, Indianapolis, IN

2 Defining Promise Programs 1 Promise programs seek to change a community, not simply award scholarships. They are: Place-based – focus on a geographically boundedcommunity (usually a school district) Long-term – allow time for people to makechoices based on the program’s benefits Share common goals: Access to post-secondary education Creation of college-going culture Community transformation

3 Defining Promise programs … is harder than it seems 2 Models vary by: – Student eligibility Universal (all graduates eligible) OR Merit requirements (GPA and attendance) – Eligible post-secondary institutions Local only, in-state public, or any institution (with tuition cap) 2-year only, 4-year included Public or private (with tuition cap) – First, middle, or last dollar – Level of student support services provided

4 A working definition 3 Promise communities are those that seek to transform themselves by making a long-terminvestment in education through place-basedscholarships. While these programs vary intheir structure, they all seek to expand accessto and success in higher education, deepenthe college-going culture in K-12 systems,and support local economic development.

5 The Promise movement 4 Since the Kalamazoo Promise was announced in 2005, more than 30 communities have created Promise programs, with at least 10 others in the planning stages. Past PromiseNet conferences have drawn representatives from more than 50 communities. Promise programs exist in all parts of the United States, in communities of varying sizes and types.

6 Promise Scholarship Programs (by date announced) Kalamazoo Promise College Bound Denver Scholarship Foundation El Dorado Promise Jackson Legacy Pittsburgh Promise Peoria Promise Bay Commitment Baldwin Promise Syracuse Say Yes to Education Garrett County New Haven Promise Arkadelphia Promise Great River Promise Sparkman Promise Benton Harbor Promise Leopard Challenge Northport Promise San Francisco Promise Ventura Promise Promise for the Future Hopkinsville Rotary Scholars Rockford Promise

7 Promise Scholarship Programs (as of 2013) Kalamazoo Promise College Bound Denver Scholarship Foundation El Dorado Promise Pittsburgh Promise Peoria Promise Bay Commitment Baldwin Promise Syracuse Say Yes to Education Garrett County New Haven Promise Arkadelphia Promise Great River Promise Sparkman Promise Benton Harbor Promise Pontiac Promise Leopard Challenge Northport Promise San Francisco Promise Ventura Promise Promise for the Future Hopkinsville Rotary Scholars LaCrosse Promise Saginaw Promise Lansing Promise Pensacola Pledge Scholars Detroit Scholarship Jackson Legacy

8 Student Eligibility Limited**Universal College and Universities Restrictive* Peoria Promise Bay Commitment Jackson Legacy Rockford Promise Ventura Promise Promise for the Future Great River Promise Hopkinsville Rotary Scholars Pensacola Pledge Scholars Montgomery County (OH) Promise Detroit Scholarship Fund Expansive College Bound Kalamazoo Promise Denver Scholarship Foundation El Dorado Promise Pittsburgh Promise Syracuse Say Yes to Education New Haven Promise Michigan Promise Zones (5) Arkadelphia Promise Northport Promise Sparkman Promise LaCrosse Promise Leopard Challenge *Scholarship can only be used at one school/college **GPA and/or attendance requirements; in a few cases, income limitations A possible typology of Promise programs for comparative analysis

9 The problem – a disjunct between policy and research Research to date is limited and non-comparative. Communities are replicating the Promise model without an empirical basis for doing so. Programs are being created without a good understanding of how program design relates to goals and outcomes. Stakeholders are eager for data and findings that do not yet exist. Strong danger that programs will over-promise and under-deliver.

10 How we can help – developing a Promise research agenda 9 Theme 1 – Students and Schools (K-12) – Bartik, Gonzalez, Kelaher-Young, Ritter Theme 2 – Post-secondary Education – Andrews/Desjardins, Iriti, Bozick Theme 3 – Community transformation – Hershbein, Miller, Miller-Adams Dissemination

11 K-12 Achievement Effects And Attitudinal Changes Post-Secondary Access, Choice, Persistence, and/or Completion Economic Development – Enrollment, Migration, Housing Kalamazoo Promise Bartik /Lachowska 2012 Bartik/Eberts/Huang 2010 Miron et al Andrews/DesJardins 2010 Miller-Adams/Timmeney 2013 Bartik/Eberts/Huang 2010 Hershbein 2013 Miller-Adams 2013 Pittsburgh PromiseGonzalez et al Iriti et al Gonzalez et al Bozick 2012 Gonzalez et al El Dorado PromiseRitter et al. under way Other / Multiple Programs Harris 2012 (Milwaukee) Bifulco and Rubenstein 2011 (Syracuse)


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