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Planning for Our Aging Population Glenn Miller, FCIP, RPP Monday, December 1, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Planning for Our Aging Population Glenn Miller, FCIP, RPP Monday, December 1, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Planning for Our Aging Population Glenn Miller, FCIP, RPP Monday, December 1, 2014

2 Planning for Our Aging Population Why we need to pay attention to aging Planners and others responsible for built environment slow to adapt to demographic shift Can urban strategies work for rural areas?

3 Why We Need to Pay Attention to Aging

4 Why Focus on Aging: the Changing Demographic Reality Canadian in 14 is Old Age Security 1957 Registered Retirement Savings Plans 1965 Canada Pension Plan 1967 Guaranteed Income Supplement

5 Understanding the Demographic Shift Canadian in 4 is 65+

6 Physical, social & fiscal impacts By 2041 – More seniors than school age children – More seniors than people of working age – Dependency ratio will be 2:1 – Low growth or decline in rural communities Source: “Canada’s Aging Population” by Health Canada and the Interdepartmental Committee on Aging and Seniors Issues, 2002

7 Percentage of seniors in %in the GTA 30.5% in the Northeast 43.8% in Prince Edward Ontario Ministry of Finance 2014

8 How rural is rural? Metropolitan Influence Zones – relocation of urbanites “Pure” rural communities see out- migration of youth Low growth rural economy strains municipal fiscal capacity to enhance ACT resources

9 Planners and others responsible for built environment slow to adapt to demographic shift

10 Why Planners Have Been Slow to Embrace “Age-Friendly Communities” WHO Global Age Friendly Cities, A Guide (2005) Outdoor spaces and buildings Transportation Housing Social Participation Respect and Social Inclusion Civic Participation and Employment Community and Health Services

11 Scale and Focus of AFC Unclear Competes for resources with other mainstream models Difficult to integrate into policy & development control processes Specific role for municipal departments unclear Focuses on today, not adapting for tomorrow

12 Can Strategies Developed for Cities Work in Rural Communities?

13 The Mobility Continuum

14 Defining mobility “The freedom to move is life itself” - L. Ling Suen The ability to travel where and when we want Having enough information about our travel options Knowing how to use those options Having the means to pay for those options Living in an environment that offers choices throughout the lifecourse

15 Reasons & Means to be Mobile Friends & Family Workplace Shopping Places of Worship Healthcare Banking Recreation Entertainment

16 Factors Driving the Decision to Relocate DRIVERSPUSHPULL PHYSICALDeclining health/mobilityEmpty nester ECONOMICReduced incomeRight sizing SOCIALSingle householderCarefree lifestyle LOCATIONIsolated…no longer viableAttractive alternative

17 The Five As applied to housing Availability: a range of options Accessibility: close to services and amenities Acceptability: safe, comfortable, pleasant Affordability: goes without saying Adaptability: accepts walkers, wheelchairs, mobility scooters, or guide animals.

18 Aging in place in one’s home – risk of isolation, lack of access to amenities, or…. Municipalities can encourage redevelopment of key sites to provide options for younger seniors to transition from SFD to apartments Aging in Place – in the Neighourhood

19 Can suburbs be successfully retrofitted?

20 Aging in a familiar place?

21 Successful Aging in Rural Communities Will Need Strategic Interventions

22 “Design for the young and you exclude the old. Design for the old and you include everyone.” Bernard Isaacs


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