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What do you think of when you hear the phrase “spring storm”? What would a poem titled “Spring Storm” be about?

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Presentation on theme: "What do you think of when you hear the phrase “spring storm”? What would a poem titled “Spring Storm” be about?"— Presentation transcript:

1 What do you think of when you hear the phrase “spring storm”? What would a poem titled “Spring Storm” be about?

2 Spring Storm by Jim Wayne Miller He comes gusting out of the house, the screen door a thunderclap behind him. He moves like a black cloud over the lawn—and stops. A hand in his mind grabs a purple crayon of anger and messes the clean sky. He sits on the steps, his eye drawing a mustache on the face of the tree. As the weather clears his rage dripping away, Wisecracks and wonderment spring up like dandelions.

3 Figurative Language “Word Candy” Making Language Sweet

4 Learning Goals:  L7-5 “Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.”  L7-5a “Interpret figures of speech in context.”  W7-3d “Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to …convey experiences and events.  R7-4 “Determine the meanings of words and phrases as they are used in a text including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g. alliteration) on a specific verse of a poem or section of a story.

5 Success Criteria:  I can define 10 types of figurative language.  I can identify examples of those 10 types of figurative language.  I can use those 10 types of figurative language as I write different genre of writing, including stories and poetry.

6 Figurative Language  Just for fun: language/http://blog.flocabulary.com/what-is-figurative- language/  Setting up your notebooks

7 1. Simile  Listen:  Respond in your “Journal Section” of your notebook:  How does the song make you feel?  What does it make you imagine or remember?  Think-Pair-Share

8 1. Simile  Turn to the Simile page in your notebook.  Read the definition of a simile.  Read the example and the non-example.  Listen to the song again and underline the similes.  What effect does each simile have on the meaning of the poem? Write those in the margin of the page. Goal: Define, identify, create

9 Spring Storm by Jim Wayne Miller He comes gusting out of the house, the screen door a thunderclap behind him. He moves like a black cloud over the lawn—and stops. A hand in his mind grabs a purple crayon of anger and messes the clean sky. He sits on the steps, his eye drawing a mustache on the face of the tree. As the weather clears his rage dripping away, Wisecracks and wonderment spring up like dandelions.

10 Simile (con’t)  Read the short essay “In the Cliffs”.  Identify at least two similes.  How does that simile work in the writing?  Can you find a non-example of simile in this essay? Goal: Define, identify, create

11 Homework:  Complete the two worksheets “Using Similes” and “Improve Your Writing With Similes”.  Choose one (or more) of your similes. Write a descriptive paragraph or a descriptive poem that uses that simile in it somewhere. Goal: Define, identify, create

12 Do Now: In your Writer’s Notebook, write a detailed simile about… As you leave the gym the smell hits you! You look around and spy a garbage can outside the door. Slowly moving closer you quickly confirm that it is the source of the odor. How stinky is it? Write a detailed simile comparing that horrible smell to…what will you choose? The smell was like the inside of my son’s sneakers after running through ten miles of cow pasture, then leaving them in the closet for a week. Goal: Define, identify, create

13 2. Metaphor  Listen:  Respond in your “Journal Section” of your notebook:  How does the song make you feel?  What does it make you imagine or remember?  Think-Pair-Share

14 2. Metaphor  Turn to the Metaphor page in your notebook.  Read the definition of a metaphor.  Read the example and the non-example.  Listen to the song again and underline the metaphors.  What effect does each metaphor have on the meaning of the poem? Write those in the margin of the page. Goal: Define, identify, create

15 Spring Storm by Jim Wayne Miller He comes gusting out of the house, the screen door a thunderclap behind him. He moves like a black cloud over the lawn—and stops. A hand in his mind grabs a purple crayon of anger and messes the clean sky. He sits on the steps, his eye drawing a mustache on the face of the tree. As the weather clears his rage dripping away, Wisecracks and wonderment spring up like dandelions.

16 Tugboat at Daybreak by Lillian Morrison The necklace of the bridge is already dimmed for morning but a tug in a tiara glides slowly up the river, a jewel of the dawn, still festooned in light. The river seems to slumber quiet in its bed, as silently the tugboat a ghostlike apparition moves twinkling up the river and disappears from sight. Goal: Define, identify, create

17 Anger is like water because…

18 Homework:  Complete the “Metaphors” worksheet.  Notice that this includes writing a poem modeled after “What is the Sun” that includes metaphors. Metaphors are cinnamon drops that add sweetness and spice to your writing. Goal: Define, identify, create

19 Do Now: 1.Read the poem “A Poison Tree”. 2.You may need help with some of the words:  Wrath = anger  Foe = enemy  Deceitful = lying  Wiles = tricks  “veil’d the pole” = made the stars dark  Outstretch’d = stretched out 3.Use RATES to answer this question in your purple folder journal pages: What are the steps the narrator took to get revenge on his enemy? How many metaphors can you find in this poem?

20 3. Personification  Listen:  Respond in your “Journal Section” of your notebook:  How does the song make you feel?  What does it make you imagine or remember?  Think-Pair-Share

21 3. Personification  Turn to the Personification page in your notebook.  Read the definition of personification.  Read the example and the non-example.  Listen to the song again and underline the personifications.  What effect does each personification have on the meaning of the poem? Write those in the margin of the page. Goal: Define, identify, create

22 Foul Shot  Read the poem “Foul Shot”.   Identify the section that uses personification.  In your journal section, list the VERBS that the author uses that are personified. Goal: Define, identify, create

23 Homework:  Choose a sport that uses a ball.  Write a poem or descriptive paragraph from the point of view of the ball, personifying the ball.  Make it humorous or suspenseful..

24 Do Now: 1.Get out your personification writing from last night. 2.Share it with your elbow partner. 3.Then move across the room and share it with another friend. 4.Did you use any metaphors or similes in your writing as well?? 5.Turn to your elbow partner and tell him/her the definition of “personification”, “simile”, and “metaphor.” Goal: Define, identify, create

25 4. Alliteration  Listen: AQHjd8 AQHjd8  Respond in your “Journal Section” of your notebook:  How does the song make you feel?  What does it make you imagine or remember?  Think-Pair-Share

26 4. Alliteration  Turn to the Alliteration page in your notebook.  Read the definition of alliteration  Read the example and the non- example.  Listen to the song again and underline the alliteration.  What effect does alliteration have on the meaning of the poem? Write your ideas in the margin of the page. Goal: Define, identify, create

27 Spring Storm by Jim Wayne Miller He comes gusting out of the house, the screen door a thunderclap behind him. He moves like a black cloud over the lawn—and stops. A hand in his mind grabs a purple crayon of anger and messes the clean sky. He sits on the steps, his eye drawing a mustache on the face of the tree. As the weather clears his rage dripping away, Wisecracks and wonderment spring up like dandelions.

28 Homework:  Re-read “Foul Shot” and use colored pencils to identify examples of alliteration in this poem. Use a different color for each alliterated sound. Goal: Define, identify, create

29 Alliteration Celebration! We will be creating a class poem to show off our super savvy alliteration skills.  Topic ideas?  Assign letters for each verse  Let’s get to writing!  Open a Word document and type your verse

30 Do Now: 1.Open up your verse of the alliteration poem. 2. Read your elbow partner’s verse. Check to make sure it…  is a complete sentence (subject + verb)  has correct spelling and grammar  is related to the topic  Contains strong alliteration 3. Use a font size of 36 for the poem and 14 for your name. Then center your verse. 4. Save as YOUR LETTER (first) and then YOUR NAME in Mrs. Paul’s in-box example: S Michael Jackson

31 5. Onomatopoeia  Listen:  Respond in your “Journal Section” of your notebook:  How does the song make you feel?  What does it make you imagine or remember?  Think-Pair-Share

32 5. Onomatopoeia  Turn to the Onomatopoeia page in your notebook.  Read the definition of onomatopoeia  Read the example and the non- example.  Listen to the song again and underline the onomatopoeias.  What effect do the onomatopoeias have on the sound and meaning of the song? Write your ideas in the margin of the page. Goal: Define, identify, create

33 Examples… 1.Meeting at Night (by Robert Browning) Three fields to cross till a farm appears; A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch And blue spurt of a lighted match… 2. Gathering Leaves (by Robert Frost) Spades take up leaves No better than spoons And bags full of leaves Are light as balloons. I make a great noise Of rustling all day Like rabbit and deer Running away.

34 Homework:  Choose at least 3 SOUND words from the list below, or come up with your own, and use them to write a descriptive poem. zap gurgle achoo boom jingle clanging fizz pop hiss rattle vroom smash

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