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Being Strategic In Scottish Government March 12, 2009 Melissa Sorrell.

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Presentation on theme: "Being Strategic In Scottish Government March 12, 2009 Melissa Sorrell."— Presentation transcript:

1 Being Strategic In Scottish Government March 12, 2009 Melissa Sorrell

2 Strategic Context Outcomes Focus Next Steps Our Journey Alignment

3 Strategy Strategy, Policy & Delivery Policy Discussion 1 Delivery

4 Context What is Strategy? Geoff Mulgan, then Head of the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit (and now of the Young Foundation) said in September 2002 that strategy should include the following: A rich and holistic understanding of causes, trends and possible futures Clarity about goals and priorities Understanding of capacities, institutions and policy tools Narratives that make sense to implementers and stakeholders Geoff Mulgan, 2002

5 Context What is Policy? …the process by which governments translate their political vision into programmes and actions to deliver “outcomes” – desired changes in the real world

6 Context Strategic Thinkers Always have the outcome in mind Can relate big picture to specifics effortlessly Motivate & inspire and are less directive Focus on the important

7 Context A Framework for Strategy Measure of success PastPresentFuture  Vision  Objectives  Enablers Desired Future Outcomes Outputs, Stakeholders, Delivery Channels Resources, Processes, People  Culture Values & Behaviours

8 Context Pressures to be Strategic Edinburgh City Chambers, where members of the public are grilling MPs over the banking crisis this morning. Public purse hit by £600m pensions shortfall Published Date: 08 March 2009 By Eddie Barnes Political Editor THE amount of public cash poured into Scottish council workers' pension schemes has soared and is predicted to hit £600m annually by 2011, Scotland on Sunday can reveal. Tumbling stock market values mean councils are having to find an extra £20m every year for the next three years to top up the final salary pensions of councillors and local government staff.

9 Context Greener The environment is as important a global issue as the economy, according to a new survey of people living in Scotland. Despite the economic downturn, around a third of people think the environment is one of the most important issues facing the world - with the same number mentioning the economy. When questioned about issues of importance to Scotland, however, three times as many people mentioned the economy as the environment, highlighting the need for people to 'think global, act local'.

10 A Desired Future for Scotland We want to live in a successful Scotland: a healthy, safe, well-educated country, with a vibrant economy and opportunities for all. We want Scotland to be fair, tolerant and green. Put simply, we want a Scotland to be proud of. A Purpose to create a more successful country where all of Scotland can flourish through increasing sustainable economic growth Our vision for success for Scotland is described and measured in four parts which support and reinforce each other: The Government's Purpose and its associated targetsPurpose Five Strategic Objectives that describe where we will focus our actionsStrategic Objectives 15 National Outcomes that describe what the Government wants to achieveNational Outcomes 45 National Indicators that enable us to track progressNational Indicators A Framework

11 Scotland’s Strategic Objectives WEALTHIER AND FAIRER Enable businesses and people to increase their wealth and more people to share fairly in that wealth. HEALTHIER Help people to sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and faster access to health care. SAFER AND STRONGER Help local communities to flourish, becoming stronger, safer place to live, offering improved opportunities and a better quality of life. SMARTER Expand opportunities for Scots to succeed from nurture through to life long learning ensuring higher and more widely shared achievements. GREENER Improve Scotland's natural and built environment and the sustainable use and enjoyment of it. Back to contents The Scottish Parliament The UK Parliament National Assembly for Wales NorthernIreland Assembly Crown Copyright

12 Context The Pace of Change

13 Context The Lens of Now Exercise 1

14 Context Scotland at home Man due in court over fatal stabbing of Livingston teen Residents in the town's Ladywell area today spoke of their shock after 18-year- old Connor Muir died just yards from the local primary school after suffering a stab wound to the chest. INVESTIGATION: Police search the pathway in Livingston where an 18-year-old was killed Published Date: 09 March 2009 By Laura Cummings A MAN was due in court today in connection with the fatal stabbing of a teenager in Livingston at the weekend.

15 Context Scotland on a world stage first meeting with the Lord Mayor of the City of London, Alderman Ian Luder, the FM meeting senior figures in the financial services sector internationally, including next month in Shanghai and Hong Kong, part of Scottish Government efforts to promote Scotland's financial services sector and attract new investment. Mr Salmond said: "Scotland's wide-ranging financial services industry is a crucial sector of the Scottish economy and the skills and adaptability of our financial workforce are truly world class. "This is clearly a difficult period internationally but it is encouraging that many sections of Scotland's financial services industry, like pensions and insurance, are continuing to perform well - only last month esure announced it would expand its Scottish operations and create 500 new, permanent jobs and this week Tesco Personal Finance announced its headquarters in Edinburgh and the creation of 200 jobs. "This Government is working to maximise opportunities for Scotland during this time of economic challenge. "We have developed a robust and innovative six-point economic recovery programme aimed at stimulating growth, for example through the recently announced creation of a financial sector Jobs Taskforce to ensure maximum levels of employment and high level skills are retained in Scotland. Exercise 1

16 Outcomes Desired Outcomes Drivers for change Trend Analysis ForecastingModellingScenarios Tools & Techniques

17 Outcomes Select Key Drivers… Politics & Power Economics & Globalisation Environment Technology & Scientific Social & Demographic Role of private actors in regulation International governance without international government International regulations Sustaining trust Failure in critical services Coordination of cross cutting work Role of agencies Food supply interruption EU versus national sovereignty Showing added value by government Global epidemics Global brands Global customers Locus of value added Geographic economic advantage Protecting uncompetitive markets International product standards Patents & copyright Networks & communication systems Flexibility of workforce Currency movements Ownership of enterprises Sea levels Climate Change Incidence of extreme weather conditions Food quantity and quality Diversity of species Sea & Ocean framing Water from ice Wave power vs other new power sources International pressure to protect environment Whaling Genetic engineering Bio waste management Pollution Geographical growth profile Citizen of wider world Completion in global job market Impact of environment change on health Alternative social structure Choice for the individual Responsibility devolved to the individual Search for happiness Community affiliation Clarity of right & wrong Measurement & metering techniques Targeting systems Diversity & the ecosystem function Surveillance systems Degradable materials Sea generated power Genetics Water power Climate Change Altered sea stocks Demand for sea for other uses Innovation in food production Wealth creating opportunities from environment Consumer expectations Social attitudes towards coastal communities Access to information Actions of major retailers Actions of major fish processors International law

18 Outcomes Logical Modelling: The Process Demand for sea for other uses Consumer expectations Social attitudes towards coastal communities Actions of major retailers & fish processors Actions of major fish processors Altered sea stocks Desired Outcome Sustainable Food Fishing – acceptable environmental impact + + Innovation in food production + + Assumes retailers will respond to regulation with new forms of demand eg on new untapped global fish stocks International regulations Assumes restrictions on traditional fishing will lead to innovation Assumes greater demand for coastal areas for eg offshore and farms adversely affects coastal fishing Climate Change Assumes increases in sea temperature s further reduce fish stocks

19 Outcomes Where will we be in 2029?

20 Outcomes Logical Modelling: The Process Demand for sea for other uses Consumer expectations – try different fish Social attitudes towards coastal communities – supportive & responsive Actions of major retailers Actions of major fish processors Altered sea stocks – will be different Desired Outcome Sustainable Food Fishing – acceptable environmental impact + + Innovation in food production + + International regulations Climate Change Active collaborative fisheries management

21 Outcomes Desired Future We believe that in twenty years’ time the fisheries sector will look very different, because of external factors such as climate change, as well as our own actions. Climate change will have altered which fish stocks are found where in EU waters – but fish will be abundant and commercial and recreational fishermen will share them. Fisheries management will deal effectively with natural fluctuations in fish stocks and with the actual and likely impacts of climate change. The full global environmental impact of the whole fisheries supply chain will be acceptable. Fisheries will not be managed in isolation, but as one of many uses of the marine environment within a system of Marine Spatial Planning. This system will aim to secure space for fishing and to minimise conflict with other uses of the sea. Consumers will increasingly expect fish to be caught sustainably, and will be more willing to try different types of fish. They will prefer locally caught seafood that provides a direct social and economic benefit to coastal communities. Small fishing businesses will be responsive to local demand for fish and will market their products actively. Large-scale commercial fishing will supply what customers want. It will be fully integrated into the supply chain, and larger processors and retailers will recognise the uncertainties of using a wild, seasonal resource. Those working in aquaculture will make sure that the environmental impacts are acceptable.

22 Outcomes Scotland’s Outcomes WEALTHIER AND FAIRER Enable businesses and people to increase their wealth and more people to share fairly in that wealth. HEALTHIER Help people to sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and faster access to health care. SAFER AND STRONGER Help local communities to flourish, becoming stronger, safer place to live, offering improved opportunities and a better quality of life. SMARTER Expand opportunities for Scots to succeed from nurture through to life long learning ensuring higher and more widely shared achievements. GREENER Improve Scotland's natural and built environment and the sustainable use and enjoyment of it. Exercise 2

23 Outcomes Learning from Mapping Exercise

24 Strategic Context Outcomes Focus Next Steps Our Journey Alignment

25 Outcomes Being Strategic for a Purpose SNP Xlk asfjh alkh tkjha dfl traq lkjdshf lauihe FUTURES Outcomes Challenge CSR ? 2009 Alignment

26 Outcomes Outcome Trees Fisheries management deal effectively with natural fluctuations in fish stocks Can measure /forecast fluctuations Know what impact fluctuations have Know what mitigates impact of fluctuations Have influence on levers to mitigate Know which fish stocks are important Know which interventions most effective Know what bodies comprise “fisheries mgmt” Relevant bodies work together Bodies take timely, effective action to manage stocks Alignment

27 Outcomes The vision London is a city where organisations work collaboratively to provide health enhancing physical activity, and where individuals incorporate physical activity into their daily lives, achieving better health outcomes. Londoners know how to access opportunities for physical activity Londoners know more Londoners who are physically active Londoners know how physical activity benefits London as a whole Londoners from under-represented groups find it easier to do physical activity Londoners choose to be active in their daily lives Londoners understand how physical activity helps their health and well being Londoners understand how physical activity can help the fight against climate change Londoners know how physical activity can improve neighbourhood safety Tackle significant health inequalities Increase access to opportunities for physical activity Enhance built and natural environment for physical activity (walking and cycling and play) Encourage market and technology to support physical activity with new products and services Increase proportion of journeys to work/leisure made by public or active transport Increase sport and physical activity opportunities in schools Increase NHS and social care investment in physical activity Run appropriate and successful festival events Increase employers’ commitment to change behaviours Identify effective role models for physical activity Increase number and proportion of adults doing sport Increase knowledge of benefits of physical activity – and of the barriers to it Objectives Outcomes Vital signs: Mental health Mortality from CVD Cancer Diabetes Obesity All other mortality causes Reception year obesity Year 6 obesity People reporting the rewards of physical activity Sustain percentage of Londoners currently physically active Proportion of adults making one or more visits to the outdoors each week Proportion of people with long term chronic disease involved in physical activity Proportion of adults making one or more visits to community/leisure facilities each week Reception year obesity Children and young people’s participation in high quality PE and sport Percentage of physical activity participation by Londoners (and decrease percentage who are inactive) Uptake of referrals of key target groups to opportunities for PA from clinical settings/primary care Indicators PSA 12: Improve health and well being in children and young people PSA 18: Improve health and well being for all PSA 21: Increase the uptake in cultural and sporting opportunities by adults and young people PSA 22: Deliver a successful Olympic Games and legacy PSA 27: Lead the global effort to avoid dangerous climate change PSAs

28 Outcomes

29 Alignment of spend to strategic priorities Bubble Data = 08/09 Programme Budget Colour Department Strategic Objective Climate Change Natural Environment SCP Environmental Risk Farming & Food Sustainable Development Rural Communities Respected Department N/A Commitment to Activity Activity Potential LowerHigher Lower Higher Bubble Diameter 050,000 £000's15,000 Alignment

30 Challenging the process Stakeholder Analysis Stakeholder Engagement Alignment

31 CSA Stakeholder Analysis Background Child support reforms ongoing High profile politically / press interest Treasury impact 2 customer clients with very different outlooks and objectives Not just about money This is for example purposes and is not necessarily representative of the current CSA situation Stakeholders Treasury PM / Govt communication machine Lone parents a) income support b) none Absent parents (different objectives) Lobby groups (many & varied) Computer industry Legal profession Alignment

32 Key Stakeholders: current Stakeholder ImportanceSupport Treasury HighLow PM / Comms HighLow Lone Parents 1 High 2 High High Low Absent Parents 1 High 2 High Low High Lobby groups Varied Computer Industry High Legal Profession HighLow Alignment

33 Supportiveness Importance High Low Stakeholder Analysis Source: Cabinet Office ‘Strategy Survival Guide’ 2004 p 80 LowHigh T P LP 1 LP 2 AP 2 AP 1 LG 1 LG 3 LG 2 CI Legal Key Monitor Manage Involve Acknowledge T =Treasury P =PM/Comms LP 1 =Lone Parent LP 2 =Lone Parent Private AP =Absent Parent AP 1 =Can’t Pay/ Won’t Pay AP 2 =Responsible LG =Lobby Groups LG1, LG2, LG3 CI =Computer Industry Legal=Legal Profession Alignment

34 Learning from Exercises Outcome Tree Stakeholder Analysis

35 Strategic Context Outcomes Focus Next Steps Our Journey Alignment

36 Public Value Substantively Valuable Legitimate & politically sustainable Operationally & administratively feasible Next Steps

37 Applicability & Use of Tools CreateEngageReview Drivers Fit for purpose Robustness Cross boundaries Test assumptions Check on track Logical Models Shared logic Test robustness Cross boundaries Policy colleagues Challenge HOW of change Stakeholder Matrix Focus to the strategy WHO are the priorities? Review progress Outcomes Trees Focus & prioirity Challenge Build delivery in strategy Maintain outcome focus Empowerment - HOW Did interventions deliver outcomes? Next Steps

38 SkillsCompetencies Next Steps MORELESS Activities Behaviours Discussion 2

39 Adaptive Leadership Principles of Adaptive Leadership Leadership can be learned. Widespread leadership that can come from anywhere within an organization Change generates resistance so exercising leadership can be difficult & dangerous Adaptive challenges are fuzzy & hard to identify clearly involve changing hearts and minds often are championed by someone who cares, but who may not have the authority to impose change imply having to learn new ways and choose between what appear to be contradictory values cannot be "managed," but must be confronted and dealt with honestly. are the gap between aspirations and reality. require responses outside the organization's standard repertoire will involve loss, often involving learning to refashion loyalties and develop new competencies shift problem-solving responsibility from authoritative experts to the stakeholders requires a longer time frame and experimentation Adaptive challenges generate disequilibrium, resistance and work avoidance. Next Steps

40 Strategic Leaders of Tomorrow New communication skills Clarity on decisions – which ones, who? Facilitate not manage Different relationships with ministers – test & challenge, broaden perspectives Confident with conflict & complexity Express opinions to test authorising environment Upfront Comfortable not knowing everything

41 Am I ready….. Next Steps ….to commit to a process or away day or meeting where I will use at least one of the tools or approaches from today to BE strategic in our contributions to the purpose statement of the Scottish Government? Next Steps

42 Thank you! Melissa Sorrell


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