Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Foundations of Catholic Healthcare Leadership. Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Foundations of Catholic Healthcare Leadership. Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Foundations of Catholic Healthcare Leadership

2 Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching Statement of Catholic Identity Impact on Catholic Healthcare

3 What challenges does Catholic social teaching present... to you personally?... to your organization?

4 Catholic Social Teaching

5 The Busy Christian’s Guide to Catholic Social Teaching Claretian Publications Chicago, IL Resources on the Internet

6

7 Historical Background Context Main Points Innovation

8 Historical Background Context Main Points Innovation

9 The Rights of Workers

10 Church’s teaching on labor has developed in response to concrete realities within society. Constants in teaching: –dignity of worker & work, –common good, –subsidiarity and participation Catholic Social Teaching and Workers

11 Concern for workers—dignity of the human person, not a commodity Dignity of Work—join in co-creation, participation in the ministry of healing Stand on side of the most vulnerable—voiceless Work for the common good Respect, dignity, collaboration essential Violence, intimidation, power-plays not acceptable Nature of work in Tradition

12 Began with Industrial Revolution –Response to Marxism-collective ownership –plight of workers, especially children –dignity of workers ability to obtain work Work as part of human dignity History & Context: Church’s Social Teaching

13 asserted rights to work, just wage, to join “associations” –“Just wage” is a certain floor below which especially the poor ought not fall emphasized duties of workers (no violence, respect property) and employers (safe workplace) asserted dignity of work Rerum Novarum (1891) Leo XIII

14 Depression, WW I, Fascism defended right to organize (spoke of associations; unions as such not emphasized) promoted subsidiarity (decision-making at appropriate level) Just wage should consider –Firms capacity for survival –Social provisions (laws) should assure –Must consider the common good Pius XI Quadragesimo Anno: On the Reconstruction of the Social Order (1931) Pius XI Quadragesimo Anno: On the Reconstruction of the Social Order (1931)Quadragesimo Anno: On the Reconstruction of the Social OrderQuadragesimo Anno: On the Reconstruction of the Social Order

15 emphasized: just wage, profit sharing, collective bargaining, –Just wage should consider global common good –It depends circumstances relationships between workers and employers should be marked by respect and good will participation in associations can contribute to humankind & common good Mater et Magistra (1961) John XXIII Christianity & Social Progress

16 The demands [of the common good] concern above all : Commitment to peace Organization of State’s power A sound judicial system Protection of the environment Provision of essential services –Food –Housing work –Education –Access to culture –Transportation –Basic healthcare –Freedom of communication and expression –Protection of religious freedoms Mater et Magistra

17 human labor superior to other tools of economic activity right to found/join labor unions right to goods sufficient for self & family Church in the Modern World (1963) Vatican II Gaudium et Spes

18 Development, humanisms, and modernity work participates in completing God’s work unions “admissible” if not based on materialistic/atheistic philosophy sincere dialog needed to build human community concern about world market and underdeveloped countries Populorum Progressio (1967) Paul VI

19 An apostolic letter, not encyclical Shift from universal authority to local solutions trade unions must not abuse power; concern that they could demand more than society can afford applications to be worked out region by region Unions—acceptable element of social life; contribute to well-being of community; calls for new forms of cooperation; workers should be able to contribute to company Octogesima Adveniens (1971) Paul VI

20 An apostolic letter, not encyclical Shift from universal authority to local solutions trade unions must not abuse power; concern that they could demand more than society can afford applications to be worked out region by region Unions—acceptable element of social life; contribute to well-being of community; calls for new forms of cooperation; workers should be able to contribute to company Octogesima Adveniens (1971) Paul VI

21 Unions are “indispensable element of social life” #20 purpose of unions not to cause struggle but to unite people to form community role of union=not to “play politics” A “family wage” verifies the system is just spirituality of work allows people to fulfill their vocations and to contribute to the development of the Kingdom of God Strikes are legitimate under limited circumstances Laborem Exercens (1981) John Paul II

22 Collapse of communism and rise of globalism Promotes subsidiarity and solidarity against capitalism –Just wage is not a “market wage” Market economics good when operating in a democratic social framework Work is a human response to God’s gifts Workers can express selves through unions Centesimus Annus (1991) John Paul II

23 In assessing whether or not an institution provides the elements of a just and fair workplace, a number of questions arise, such as: Does the institution provide a safe and healthful working environment? Do the lowest paid workers receive wages sufficient to sustain themselves and their families? Is health care insurance provided or are wages sufficient for a worker to both sustain a family and purchase health care insurance? Fair and Just Workplace: Principles and Practices for Catholic Health Care Fair and Just Workplace: Principles and Practices for Catholic Health Care

24 Are training and educational opportunities that will lead to advancement and promotions available to workers? What is the purpose of part-time or contract positions -- to advance the mission of the institution and meet the needs of workers, or to avoid paying benefits? Do workers have easy access to written procedures that explain how to resolve disputes with supervisors or file a grievance to protect their rights or the rights of others? Do workers have avenues for meaningful input into decisions affecting the workplace? Fair and Just Workplace: Fair and Just Workplace:

25 Conclusions: Teaching on labor is not static Arises from a particular historical context Shows development, clarity, cautions Strong themes and some constants that cover a period of over 150 years of theological reflection Unions are not the only effective ways for workers to have an effective voice While it is the right of workers to join unions, it does not say that joining a union will in every case advance the interests of workers In securing rights one is never permitted to deny another’s basic human rights such as life, health, and education.

26 Right to work, safe workplace, just wage, benefits necessary to enjoy life Right to a voice in the workplace Right to join (or not join) associations Promotion of subsidiarity and participation Uphold dignity of work Greed, violence, coercion unacceptable Encourage participation by worker Church Teaching Calls for:

27 Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching Statement of Catholic Identity Impact on Catholic Healthcare

28 Ten Building Blocks Of Catholic Social Teaching William Byron, SJ

29 Read principle silently Identify a story from your personal life or organization where you have seen this principle in action and the challanges is poses Discuss

30 Ten Building Blocks Of Catholic Social Teaching William J. Byron AMERICA Oct. 31, Discuss 1 Principle Identify and Record: –Concrete personal and institutional examples –Challenges

31 1. The Principle of Human Dignity. "Every human being is created in the image of God and redeemed by Jesus Christ, and therefore is invaluable and worthy of respect as a member of the human family" (Reflections, p. 1).

32 2. The Principle of Human Equality. "Equality of all persons comes from their essential dignity.... While differences in talents are a part of God's plan, social and cultural discrimination in fundamental rights... are not compatible with God's design".

33 3. The Principle of Respect for Human Life. "Every person, from the moment of conception to natural death, has inherent dignity and a right to life consistent with that dignity" (Reflections, pp. 1-2).

34 4. The Principle of the Common Good. "The common good is understood as the social conditions that allow people to reach their full human potential and to realize their human dignity" ("Summary," p. 25).

35 5. The Principle of Preferential Protection for the Poor and Vulnerable. "In a society marred by deepening divisions between rich and poor, our tradition recalls the story of the last judgment (Mt. 25:31-46) and instructs us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable first" (Reflections, p. 5).

36 6. The Principle of Subsidiarity. This principle deals chiefly with "the responsibilities and limits of government, and the essential roles of voluntary associations" (Reflections, p. 6).

37 7. The Principle of Participation. "We believe people have a right and a duty to participate in society, seeking together the common good and well-being of all, especially the poor and vulnerable" (Reflections, p. 5).

38 8. The Principle of Association. "[O]ur tradition proclaims that the person is not only sacred but also social. How we organize our society--in economics and politics, in law and policy--directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community" (Reflections, p. 4).

39 9. The Principle of Solidarity. "Catholic social teaching proclaims that we are our brothers' and sisters' keepers, wherever they live. We are one human family.... Learning to practice the virtue of solidarity means learning that 'loving our neighbor' has global dimensions in an interdependent world" (Reflections, p. 5).

40 10. The Principle of Stewardship. "The Catholic tradition insists that we show our respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation" (Reflections, p. 6).

41 Mission Statement How is our mission statement aligned with these elements?

42 Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching Statement of Catholic Identity Impact on Catholic Healthcare

43 Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a healing, transforming presence within the communities we serve.

44 As a System of caregivers, we commit ourselves to help bring people and communities to health and wholeness as part of the healing ministry of Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church.

45


Download ppt "Foundations of Catholic Healthcare Leadership. Catholic Social Teaching Introduction to a Catholic Worldview Let Justice Flourish Catholic Social Teaching."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google