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Introduction to Chapter 2 – Section 3 & 4. To identify trade networks in Africa and Asia from background knowledge Goal for Today.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Chapter 2 – Section 3 & 4. To identify trade networks in Africa and Asia from background knowledge Goal for Today."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Chapter 2 – Section 3 & 4

2 To identify trade networks in Africa and Asia from background knowledge Goal for Today

3 What was the world like before 1500? EuropeAfricaAsiaMiddle East

4 Chapter 2 – Section 3 Trade Networks of Africa and Asia

5 Building on Background Knowledge – Comparing the Past to Today What goods are highly valued today? What goods were highly valued in the 1400s?

6 Picture Vocabulary Directions A picture will be shown that represents one of the vocabulary words. Stand up to guess what the picture represents. After you guess, you must use it in a complete sentence correctly or give an example to help you remember it. If this is done correctly, you will get a History Buck.

7 Arabia Definition: Center of trade routes connecting the Mediterranean world with Asia and Africa.

8 First Global Age = the long- distance trade and travel that grew in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia in the 1400s

9 Caravans = groups of people who traveled together for safety

10 Silk Road = The Central Asian routes linking China and the Middle East

11 Quran (Koran) = Holy book of Islam

12 Islam = religion that emerged in the 600s in Arabia with Muhammad as the founder

13 City-State = A large town that has its own government and controls the surrounding countryside.

14 Savanna = A region of grasslands.

15 Extended Family = Several generations live in one household

16 Swahili = language blending Arabic and local African languages that emerged from Muslim traders in East Africa

17 Mansa Musa = Mali’s famous Muslim ruler

18 Kinship = Sharing of common ancestor

19 Timbuktu = Major trading center for Mali and Songhai

20 Previewing the Section – African and Asian Trade Networks KWL

21 Closure Tell a friend: What is one thing you remember about trade in Africa and Asia? Homework: Read the section and have them turn the main headings into questions and then answer the questions. You may also use the objectives in the Prepare to Read section (p.50)

22 Chapter 2, Section 3 Trade Networks of Africa and Asia Goals to learn: Why did trade flourish in the Muslim world? What trading states rose in Africa and what was life like for people in many African cultures? How did China’s overseas trade expand in the early 1400s?

23 Opener to the Content: Comparing the Past to Today - The Silk Road d= n.http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?i d= n In the PastToday

24 Chapter 2, Section 3 Why Trade Flourished in the Muslim World? The First Global Age = the long- distance trade and travel that grew in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia in the 1400s Arabia = Center of trade routes connecting the Mediterranean world with Asia and Africa. Arab merchants played a role in the growing trade. Muslim sailors were the experts. Developed knowledge of the Indian Ocean. Sailed to the many ports of Africa and India. Muslims were in the middle of the trade. They were the MIDDLEMEN. Muslim traders also traveled overland across Central Asia. The Central Asian routes linking China and the Middle East are known as the Silk Road. Because the Silk Road was dangerous, traders formed caravans—groups of people who traveled together for safety. Muslim trade spread Islam.

25 Map of Trade Routes of Asia and Africa Online Textbook – Map Trade Routes of Asia and Africa Geography Skills – p.51

26 Chapter 2, Section 3 What were the trading states of Africa? City-states of East Africa (Kilwa, Sofala) Gold was carried to African coastal cities such as Kilwa and Sofala and across the Indian Ocean to India and China Wealth from trade helped East African rulers build strong city- states—large towns that have their own governments and control the surrounding countyside. Many rulers became Muslims. A new language, Swahili, blended Arab words and African languages. Trading kingdoms of West Africa (Mali, Songhai) Several trading kingdoms grew up in a region of grasslands called the savanna. Timbuktu- major trading center Many rulers adopted Islam.

27 African Middle Kingdoms Rich cultures such as Mali, Ghana, and Songhai were at the center of the trade routes between North and West Africa. They were rich in gold, ivory, iron, and slaves.

28 What were the trading kingdoms of West Africa? Mali Most famous ruler – Mansa Musa 1324 – Mansa Musa made a pilgrimage to Mecca Songhai Most powerful kingdom in West Africa in 1400s Major city - Timbuktu

29 Movie Frame Notes –What was life like in early Africa? You are movie producer and need to create a show for the Discovery Channel about life in early Africa. Use information from your textbook and your own knowledge to complete the movie frame notes Remember to include how trade and African culture affected life in early Africa. Share with a friend and then your friend will share your story with the class.

30 Chapter 2, Section 3 Describe life in many African trading cultures. Where people lived Most people of Africa lived in small villages away from the powerful trading states. How they earned a living Most people made a living by herding, fishing, or farming. Family life Family relationships were important. Many people lived within an extended family —several generations living in one household. Importance of kinship Ties of kinship, or sharing a common ancestor, linked families. People related by kinship owed loyalty to one another. Religious beliefs Beliefs varied widely. However, common beliefs included the idea that links among family members lasted even after a person died. Africans honored the spirits of their ancestors as well as the forces of nature.

31 ***Early Africa and Trade (3:24)***

32 Chapter 2, Section 3 China’s Overseas Trade in the 1400s China was ruled by an emperor. An emperor who came to power in 1402 was eager for trade. He ordered a fleet of more than 300 ships to be built. The fleet was commanded by Admiral Zheng He. Zheng He made seven voyages. His fleet traded in Southeast Asia, India, Arabia, and East Africa. After Zheng He’s death in 1435, China’s overseas voyages abruptly ended. No one is sure why.

33 What If…? – Rewriting History Journal Prompt Journal prompt: How could history have been rewritten with Zheng He’s voyages???? Share your thoughts: Round table summary of your Thoughts Homework: Complete what you learned on KWL CHART.

34 Exit Ticket - Key Point of the African and Asian Trade Networks Write your name and letter on the index card. Must hand in before you leave class. What linked the peoples of Africa and Asia long before European exploration? A.War B.Government C.Trade D.Culture

35 Chapter 2, Section 3 Section 3 Assessment Which statement best describes Islam in the 1400s? a) Islamic traders would trade only with other Muslim merchants. b) Islam’s followers believed in many gods. c) Islam was spread by the Chinese admiral, Zheng He. d) Islam began in Arabia and spread across a vast area including North Africa. Which statement best describes Chinese trade in the 1400s? a) Eventually a Chinese fleet crossed the Pacific and rounded the tip of South America. b) In the early 1400s, a large Chinese fleet traded in many foreign ports; then, after thirty years, it suddenly stopped. c) In the 1400s, the Chinese built a new fleet patterned after the many Chinese fleets before it. d) The Chinese established several trading cities on the west coast of Africa. Want to connect to the American Nation link for this section? Click here.Click here.

36 Chapter 2, Section 3 Section 3 Assessment Which statement best describes Islam in the 1400s? a) Islamic traders would trade only with other Muslim merchants. b) Islam’s followers believed in many gods. c) Islam was spread by the Chinese admiral, Zheng He. d) Islam began in Arabia and spread across a vast area including North Africa. Which statement best describes Chinese trade in the 1400s? a) Eventually a Chinese fleet crossed the Pacific and rounded the tip of South America. b) In the early 1400s, a large Chinese fleet traded in many foreign ports; then, after thirty years, it suddenly stopped. c) In the 1400s, the Chinese built a new fleet patterned after the many Chinese fleets before it. d) The Chinese established several trading cities on the west coast of Africa. Want to connect to the American Nation link for this section? Click here.Click here.


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