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The GHS: Overview Presentation Peter Haynes Regional Workshop on Chemical Hazard Communication and GHS Implementation for Countries of ASEAN 17 October.

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Presentation on theme: "The GHS: Overview Presentation Peter Haynes Regional Workshop on Chemical Hazard Communication and GHS Implementation for Countries of ASEAN 17 October."— Presentation transcript:

1 The GHS: Overview Presentation Peter Haynes Regional Workshop on Chemical Hazard Communication and GHS Implementation for Countries of ASEAN 17 October 2005

2 Content History, scope and application of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) Key elements of the GHS GHS implementation in Australia

3 International mandate 1992 UNCED Agreement, endorsed by the UN General Assembly: A globally-harmonised hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, should be available, if feasible, by the year Programme Area B, Chapter 19, Agenda 21

4 Process Harmonization United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) Interorganization Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC) Coordinating Group for the Harmonization of Chemical Classification Systems (CG/HCCS) Physical hazards:Health andHazard UNTDG + ILOenvironmentalcommunication: hazards: OECDILO

5 Dangerous Goods UN Committees United Nations Economic and Social Council's Sub- Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UNSCETDG) Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (TDG) and on the GHS (UNCETDG/GHS) Sub-Committee on TDG Sub-Committee on GHS

6 Scope of the GHS The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals: Is a comprehensive tool that harmonises chemical classification and hazard communication Covers all hazardous chemical substances, dilute solutions and mixtures Classification based on the hazard properties of the chemical

7 The Principles of Harmonization The level of protection should not be reduced as a result of harmonisation. The scope includes both hazard classification criteria and hazard communication tools (labels, MSDS). Changes in all existing systems will be required.

8 The Principles of Harmonization The GHS does not include requirements for testing. Target audiences include consumers, workers, transport workers and emergency responders. In relation to chemical hazard communication, Confidential Business Information (CBI) should be protected.

9 The Benefits of Harmonisation Countries, international organisations, chemical producers and users of chemicals all benefit Enhanced protection of humans and environment Facilitate international trade in chemicals Reduce need for testing and evaluation Assist countries and international organisations in the sound management of chemicals

10 Key Elements of the GHS The GHS Elements include: Classification Criteria Physicochemical Health (acute and chronic) Environmental Mixtures Hazard communication Labels Safety Data Sheets Education & Training

11 GHS Classification Criteria – Physical Hazards Explosives Flammability – gases, aerosols, liquids, solids Oxidisers – liquid, solid, gases Self-Reactive Pyrophoric – liquids, solids Self-Heating Organic Peroxides Corrosive to Metals Gases Under Pressure Water activated flammable gases

12 GHS Classification Criteria – Health & Environmental Hazards Acute Toxicity Skin Corrosion/Irritation Serious Eye Damage/Eye Irritation Respiratory or Skin Sensitization Germ Cell Mutagenicity Carcinogenicity Reproductive Toxicity Target Organ Systemic Toxicity – Single and Repeated Dose Hazardous to the Aquatic Environment

13 Hazard Categories Each hazard class has one or more categories of hazard, based on severity, eg.Acute Toxicity: Oral LD 50 (mg/kg body weight): ≤ 55 < LD 50 ≤ 5050 < LD 50 ≤ < LD 50 ≤ < LD 50 ≤ 5000 GHS Hazard Category: Category 1Category 2Category 3Category 4Category 5

14 Hazard Communication – Label Elements Product identifier Supplier identifier Chemical identity Hazard pictograms Signal words Hazard statements Precautionary statements

15 Hazard communication – Label elements: Transport pictograms

16 Hazard communication – Label elements: GHS pictograms

17 Hazard communication – Label elements: Signal Words Two signal words Danger Warning

18 Hazard communication – Label elements: Hazard Statements Provides information about the hazard, eg. Extremely flammable liquid and vapour (for Flammable Liquids Cat 1) Fatal if inhaled (for Acute Toxicity: Inhalation - Cat 1) Harmful if swallowed (for Acute Toxicity: Oral – Cat 4)

19 Acute Toxicity: Oral LD 50 (mg/kg body weight): ≤ 55 < LD 50 ≤ 5050 < LD 50 ≤ < LD 50 ≤ < LD 50 ≤ 5000 GHS Hazard Category: Category 1Category 2Category 3Category 4Category 5 GHS Label Danger Fatal if swallowed Danger Fatal if swallowed Danger Toxic if swallowed Warning Harmful if swallowed No symbol Warning May be harmful if swallowed

20 Hazard communication – Label elements: Precautionary Statements Statements that relate to: Prevention Response Storage Disposal Generally up to 3 statements for each of these per category

21 International Implementation Implementation internationally aimed for 2008 New version of the GHS released in August 2005 SDS guidance (new appendix) New precautionary statements Some new and revised classification criteria Editorial amendments

22 Implementation Issues Alignment of hazard classification systems with the GHS Alignment of TDG and GHS systems internationally (underway) Labelling Consistent approach Need for guidance at international level Building block approach – common understanding

23 Chemical regulation in Australia Generally, policy is developed at the national level and enforced by State and Territory jurisdictions Currently a complex arrangement, several sectors A single chemical may be covered by a number of sectors and therefore subject to numerous pieces of regulation

24 Chemical regulation in Australia Australia has several chemical regulatory regimes covering: Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (DAFF/APVMA) Dangerous Goods Transport (DoTARS/NTC) Environment (DEH) Explosives (DEWR/AFER) Industrial Chemical Assessment and Registration (NICNAS) Poisons (DoHA/NDPSC) Workplace Chemicals (DEWR/ASCC) Others (TGA, Trade Practices, etc)

25 Australian Implementation Working to be in a position to implement by 2008 Development of a single regulatory framework for the control of workplace chemicals Amalgamate current frameworks Achieve consistency across jurisdictions Implement the GHS New SDS and labelling codes of practice

26 A single workplace chemical regulatory framework 1 system of classification 1 set of rules Less complicated More easily understood (by all parties) Higher level of compliance Reduce the risks of chemical use

27 Australian Implementation Implementation of the GHS important for mutual recognition of chemicals with New Zealand Alignment and its timing with key chemical trading partners important

28 Implementation Issues Need to manage transition to new framework Common legislative requirements and timing Education (label elements) Phase in period when current and new requirements will be accepted Allow recognition of GHS prior to formal commencement

29 Questions? GHS website: publi/ghs/ghs_welcome_e.html GHS Document – Rev.1 hs/ghs_rev01/01files_e.html


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