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MISD Literacy Block Units 3-5 Meet Common Core State Standards.

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Presentation on theme: "MISD Literacy Block Units 3-5 Meet Common Core State Standards."— Presentation transcript:

1 MISD Literacy Block Units 3-5 Meet Common Core State Standards

2 Units Meet Common Core Reading Anchor Standards O Read Aloud correlates with Standards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9. O Shared Reading correlates with Standards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. O Guided Reading correlates with Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. O Independent Reading correlates Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. O Strategies That Work correlates with Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. O GHR for Summary/Multiple-Choice/Craft correlates with Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. O Writing: Thematic Prompts/Quick Writes correlate with Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10. O Focus Questions correlate with Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10. O Vocabulary in Context correlates with Standards 4 and 10. O Fluency correlates with Standards 4 and 10. O Research correlates with Standards 7 and 10.

3 Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr If you have done this unit, which activity did your students like most?

4 Walk Through O Back Cover: “Blurb” designed to sell book. O Prologue: Introduction with background info. O Epilogue: What happens after book ends. O Appendix: (How to Fold a Paper Crane) O Author Note: Author info. related to book Lesson 1, Appendix 1a1

5 Scavenger Hunt QuestionPage NumberAnswerWhich text feature did you use to help you? What is the girl folding in the illustration? 34A paper craneIllustration What is the ISBN number for this edition of the book? 4ISBN Copyright Page Is this book based on a true story? Back Coveryes Blurb How do you fold a paper crane? 69-80Follow the step-by- step directions and diagrams. Appendix What happened after the book ended? 64A memorial statue was dedicated in Sadako’s honor in Epilogue

6 Strategies That Work O asking questions O visualizing O determining importance O synthesizing O inferring O making connections O repairing comprehension 6-Making Connections, 1-Asking Questions, and 4-Synthesizing: I have heard that when somebody comes in contact with radiation, he or she can get leukemia. I wonder if the radiation from the bomb has caused leukemia. That’s what the author is saying. I wonder why the author is writing about leukemia. Is it going to come back up in the novel? I’ve heard that authors sometimes do something called foreshadowing to hint to the reader that something will happen later in the book. I think that is what the author is doing. Lesson 2, see also Lesson 15.

7 Pre-assessment Answers: 1.b inferential, main idea 2.b inferential, setting 3.a literal, setting 4.a literal, detail 5.d inferential, vocabulary meaning 6.c inferential, characterization 7.d literal, plot 8.d literal, setting 9.c inferential, craft 10. a literal, plot Lesson 1

8 Genre: Biography Characters: Who is the main character in the biography? Who are the other characters in the biography? Setting: When and where does the biography take place? Problem/Goal: What problem does the main character have, or what does the main character want? Events: What does the main character do to solve his/her problem or get what he/she wants? Resolution: How is the problem solved? OR How does the main character learn to deal with the problem? Central Idea/Theme: What is the central idea or theme of the biography? Lessons 2 and 4

9 Writing O Common Core Genre Thematic Prompts O Focus Question O Quick Writes

10 Explanatory Prompt When people face a dangerous or difficult situation, they need courage or bravery. For example, one would have to have courage to dive from a high diving board for the first time, to perform for an audience, to make a speech, to stick up for a friend, or to stand up to a bully. Writing Prompt Explain how a person you admire has shown courage in a difficult or dangerous situation. LESSON 2, Discuss what you would write about.

11 Scaffolding Introduction: State your main idea about your topic: showing courage Development: Support your main idea with relevant evidence, facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, information, and examples. Conclusion: End by briefly restating the main idea and the most important evidence for the main idea. Revising/Proofreading:  Reread your writing to see if you have explained things in order and by giving related details and examples.  Check to make sure you have linked ideas with words such as another, for example, also, especially.  Check to make sure you have used precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to explain your main idea.  Check and correct your spelling, punctuation, and capitalization to make sure your reader will understand your explanation.

12 Follow-up in Lesson 20 Explanatory Prompt : My Definition of Courage Think about your own definition of courage: Write your own definition of courage. Explain how your ideas about courage have changed because of what you have read, listened to, and viewed during this unit. Use examples from the unit and from your life as evidence to support your definition of courage. OR You may choose one of the definitions below and explain why it describes your feelings about courage. Explain how your ideas about courage have changed because of what you have read, listened to, and viewed during this unit. Use examples from the unit and from your life as evidence to support your definition of courage. O Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear. –Ambrose Redmoon O Courage is not living without fear. Courage is being scared to death and doing the right thing anyway. –Chae Richardson O True courage is keeping everything together when everyone expects you to fall apart. –Unknown

13 Writing Prompts O Explanations and ideas O Checklist (CCSS) O Writing Process O Graphic Organizer O Peer Editing Questions (SBAC)

14 Focus Question and Quick Writes Focus Question # 1 (Appendix 10b and Rubric 10c) Sadako continues to show her courage, even though she is not feeling well. How does she demonstrate this? Answer Plan–What to do: 1. Restate the question. 2. Tell the ways that Sadako shows her courage by saying or doing things to make others feel better. 3. Make a connection in your own life about a time that you made an effort to help someone feel better or saw someone else make such an effort. Possible Answer: (1) Even though Sadako is not feeling well, she shows her courage in a number of ways. (2) Sadako encourages another leukemia victim, Kenji, to make paper cranes “so that a miracle can happen.” She makes a paper crane, using her prettiest paper, for Kenji, hoping it will bring him luck, since he has no family to visit him or help make paper cranes. She makes an attempt to eat her favorite foods brought to the hospital by her mother. Sadako jokes about the silver paper given to her by her brother to use for another paper crane. It is a chocolate candy wrapper. She says that she “hope[s] the gods [like] chocolate.” Her family laughs at her joke. She never complains about her pain or taking medication. She brings hope to herself and others by making comments about what she will do when she feels better. She tries on the kimono that her mother has made. (3) I know about trying to make people feel better, because when my mom couldn't talk because of a stroke, I sang to her, and she tried to sing. That made her smile. Reflection/Quick Write: Write about what you learned about writing a good answer to a question from this lesson.

15 Literacy Block Components O Read Aloud O Shared Reading O Guided Reading O Independent Reading

16 Read Aloud WHY DO IT? READING ALOUD: O Models fluent reading (phrasing) and allows the teacher to model specific strategies that will be taught later in shared and guided reading. HOW DO YOU DO IT? PROCEDURE: O The teacher selects the text from all daily curricular areas with specific teaching goals in mind. O The teacher introduces the text and builds necessary background knowledge. O The teacher gives a focus for listening. O The teacher reads the text with expression, intonation, and appropriate pacing. Appendix 1b

17 Shared Reading WHY DO IT? SHARED READING: O Provides guided practice of strategies that make text understandable. O For struggling readers it encourages following along with print to build fluency and word recognition. HOW DO YOU DO IT? PROCEDURE O Text must be in the hand of or visible to all students. O During reading, the teacher encourages students to join in, take risks, and look for information. O The teacher pauses as necessary during reading to discuss text features, to ask students for predictions and conclusions, and to ask students to make connections to their own experience, another text, or the world. Appendix 4b

18 Shared Reading Scaffolding  Read together through the fourth paragraph on page 16. Stop and ask students the following questions: o Which new character do we meet? (Chizuko) Why is she special in the book? (She is Sadako’s best friend.) Remind students that they should be asking questions such as this when they read. (Strategies That Work, Appendix 2c) o Why does Mrs. Sasaki warn Sadako to go slowly? (It is hot.) o How does Mr. Sasaki feel about his daughter’s running? (He is proud.)  Continue reading together to the end of the chapter (p. 20) and discuss why Sadako is frightened by the pictures she sees. (She remembers the atom bomb—the Thunderbolt. You could mention to students that sometimes authors give hints about what might happen later in the book. This is called foreshadowing. The author, Eleanor Coerr, could be giving a hint here.)

19 Craft Tell students that authors make their writing more interesting by using something we call writer’s craft. For example, writers use figures of speech called similes. Similes compare things that are unlike each other using the words like or as. Have students turn to page 16 and read the last few lines. The author uses a simile to describe the friendship of Sadako and Chizuko by comparing the friendship to “…two pine needles on the same twig.” She compares two unlike things, the girls’ friendship and pine needles, using the word as. Point out other examples in the chapter:  P. 18: “Sadako thought the doves looked like spirits of the dead flying into the freedom of the sky.”  P. 20: “They floated out to sea like a swarm of fireflies against the dark water.”

20 Guided Reading WHY DO IT? GUIDED READING: O Provides opportunities to problem solve while reading for meaning. O Provides opportunities to use strategies on extended text. HOW DO YOU DO IT? O Before reading, students are encouraged to look over the text, share comments, and predict: the text type or genre, the format or lay-out, the content, and the likely purpose of the reading. O During reading, students are encouraged to: O Read for meaning. O Monitor understanding. (Ask: Does this make sense?) Appendix 5a2

21 Independent Reading HOW DO YOU DO IT? O Provides the opportunity to read and apply reading strategies to a wide variety of texts. O Provides opportunities to use strategies independently on extended text. HOW DO YOU DO IT? O Provides the opportunity to read and apply reading strategies to a wide variety of texts. O Students and teacher confer, share, and discuss texts read. Appendix 5a1

22 Preparing for Reading O Vocabulary before, during, or after O Focus for Reading/Listening

23 Focus for Listening/Reading O Focus for Listening: Who are the characters? (Sadako, Mother, Father, Masahiro, Mitsue, and Eiji) What is the setting? (Japan, a number of years after the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima during World War II.) Is there a problem? (Sadako can’t wait to go to the memorial.) O Focus for Reading: Why is Chapter 3 titled “Sadako’s Secret” and Chapter 4 titled “A Secret No Longer”? (At the bottom of page 24, the author tells us that Sadako is dizzy and that her heart was “…thumping painfully against her chest.” Then on page 26, the author tells the reader: “Sometimes after a long run the dizziness returned.” Finally, in Chapter 4, Sadako collapses after running to school, her father takes her to the hospital, and the doctors think that she might have leukemia, the atom bomb disease.)

24 Reading Literature balanced with related Informational Text

25 Guided Highlighted Reading O Prompts for Vocabulary, Summary, and Craft O Multiple-Choice O Summary From Guided Highlighted Reading: A Close-Reading Strategy for Navigating Complex Text, Weber, Nelson, and Schofield, 2011, Maupin House.

26 Guided Highlighted Reading: O is text-driven and meaning-based O focuses students on the context of text O guides students to read for one reading purpose at a time O invites and guides students to revisit the text more than once O guides students to return to the same text for multiple purposes O targets the acquisition of skills needed for close and critical reading O builds fluency and stamina in readers O uses multiple senses: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic From Guided Highlighted Reading: A Close-Reading Strategy for Navigating Complex Text, Weber, Nelson, and Schofield, 2011, Maupin House.

27 The Japanese Red- Crowned Crane Guided Highlighted Reading for Vocabulary, Summary, and Craft Lesson 7 Appendix 7c1-6

28 Speaking and Listening O Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. O Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). O Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. O Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

29 9/11 Memorial

30 Sadako Memorial

31 Descriptive Essay O Descriptive writing asks the student to describe an object, person, place, experience, emotion, situation, etc.: O Take time to brainstorm. O Use clear language. O Choose vivid words—vivid verbs, nouns, and adjectives. O Use your senses: see, hear, smell, taste, touch. O Tell your readers what you are thinking. O Leave the reader with a clear picture. O Make sure your writing is well organized.

32 Description: Comparison and Contrast You have viewed a video of the 9/11 Memorial in New York City and viewed pictures of the Sadako Sasaki Memorial in Peace Park in Japan. You will now describe both memorials so that your readers will be able to “see” what you saw. Writing Prompt Describe both the 9/11 Memorial in New York City and the Sadako Sasaki Memorial in Peace Park in Japan.

33 Scaffolding Introduction: Introduce your piece by giving a brief description of each of the memorials—9/11 and Sadako. Development: Support your main idea with relevant evidence, facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, information, and examples.  Give concrete details to describe each memorial so your readers will be able to see what you saw.  Describe in detail how the memorials are the same.  Describe in detail how the memorials are the different. Conclusion: End by summarizing the similarities and differences. Revising/Proofreading:  Reread your writing to see if you have explained things in order and by giving related details and examples.  Check to make sure you have linked ideas with words such as another, for example, also, especially.  Check to make sure you have used precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to explain your main idea.  Check and correct your spelling, punctuation, and capitalization to make sure your reader will understand your explanation.

34 Research Opportunities Researching Sadako Sasaki’s Life Since Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes is a biography, how closely does the book mirror her real life?

35 Research Scaffolding Modified I-Search Research question I am answering: “Since Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes is a biography, how closely does the book mirror her real life? Reference source where I found my answer: What I learned: Connections (text-text; text-world; text-self):

36 Thank You! Original Authors O Clare Baxter 3 rd Roseville O Diana Ronayne 3 rd Mount Clemens O Linda Pelloni 3 rd Lakeview O Sue Francek 3 rd Roseville O Marcia Powell 4 th Van Dyke O Mary Dombro 4 th Anchor Bay O Renee Fiema 4 th L’Anse Creuse O Sandy Hudkins 4 th Van Dyke O Cathy Walle 5 th Consultant O Dave Figurski 5 th Warren O Debbie Parrish 5 th Fraser O Jackie Rybinski 5 th Warren Advisory Team O Clare Baxter, Consultant O Diane Berg, Consultant O Virginia Daniels, Fraser O Betsy Facione, Utica O Mary Kate Fitzpatrick, Fraser O Theresa Hasenauer, Utica O Melissa Labadie, Utica O Stephanie La Belle, Van Dyke O Kathy Ming, Consultant O Debbie Parrish, Consultant O Sharon Rice, Van Dyke O Elaine Weber, MISD

37 Thank You! MISD for encouragement and support


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