Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

E28A: The Poetic Imagination Carpe Diem Oct. 8. 2014.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "E28A: The Poetic Imagination Carpe Diem Oct. 8. 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 E28A: The Poetic Imagination Carpe Diem Oct

2 Christopher Marlowe’s ( ) “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” (1588? pub. 1599) Sir Walter Raleigh’s ( ) “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” (1596) VS.

3 all all all amber And And And And And and and and and and and and and and As as be be be be beds belt birds buckles buds By cap clasps cold Come Come coral craggy dale dance day delight delights dishes do each each Embroider’d fair falls feed field finest flocks flowers For for for for fragrant from gods gold gown hills I If if ivory ivy kirtle lambs leaves linèd live live live Love Love Love made madrigals make may may May-morning me me me me meat Melodious mind mountains move move my my my myrtle of of of of of of on our pleasures pleasures posies precious Prepared pretty prove pull purest rivers rocks roses see Shall shall shallow shepherd shepherds silver sing sit slippers straw studs swains table thee thee thee their Then There There these these thousand Thy thy thy thy to upon valleys we we we which whose will will will With With with with with with wool yield

4 All all age amber And And and and and and and and be be be becometh beds belt break breed buds But but can cap cares clasps cold Coral come come complains could date delights do drives dumb every fade fall fancy’s field fields flocks flowers fold folly forgotten from Had heart honey gall gowns grow If in Ivy joys kirtle last live love love me me means might might mind move move move my need no no no nor live love love love Philomel pleasures posies pretty rage reason rest reckoning ripe Rivers Rocks Roses rotten Shepherd’s Soon soon soon sorrow’s spring still studs straw these Then thee thee thee these these Thy Thy thy thy thy thy thy thy thy Time tongue tongue truth wanton wayward were When winter with with wither world yields young youth

5 all all all amber And And And And And and and and and and and and and and As as be be be be beds belt birds buckles buds By cap clasps cold Come Come coral craggy dale dance day delight delights dishes do each each Embroider’d fair falls feed field finest flocks flowers For for for for fragrant from gods gold gown hills I If if ivory ivy kirtle lambs leaves linèd live live live Love Love Love made madrigals make may may May-morning me me me me meat Melodious mind mountains move move my my my myrtle of of of of of of on our pleasures pleasures posies precious Prepared pretty prove pull purest rivers rocks roses see Shall shall shallow shepherd shepherds silver sing sit slippers straw studs swains table thee thee thee their Then There There these these thousand Thy thy thy thy to upon valleys we we we which whose will will will With With with with with with wool yield All all age amber And And and and and and and and be be be becometh beds belt break breed buds But but can cap cares clasps cold Coral come come complains could date delights do drives dumb every fade fall fancy’s field fields flocks flowers fold folly forgotten from Had heart honey gall gowns grow If in Ivy joys kirtle last live love love me me means might might mind move move move my need no no no nor live love love love Philomel pleasures posies pretty rage reason rest reckoning ripe Rivers Rocks Roses rotten Shepherd’s Soon soon soon sorrow’s spring still studs straw these Then thee thee thee these these Thy Thy thy thy thy thy thy thy thy Time tongue tongue truth wanton wayward were When winter with with wither world yields young youth

6 MOODTONE Mood—is the emotions you feel while you are reading. Some poems make you feel sad, others joyful, still others, angry. The main purpose for some poems is to set a mood. Tone—is the attitude that a poet takes toward the audience, the subject, or the character. Tone is conveyed through the poem’s words and details. When detecting and discussing tone, answers will be similar, but when discussing mood, they depend on the reaction of each member of the audience. What makes one angry may make another feel pity? Tone emanates from a poet's attitude toward his subject; the reader needs to recognize how the speaker’s emotions toward the subject should color the audience’s response to the text. Mood results more from the poet/speaker’s intention to produce an emotional response in the reader to what is going on in the poem; thus the reader/intended audience needs to recognize how (s)he is supposed to feel as opposed to what the narrator is feeling.

7 To identify the TONE of a poem, consider: 1) content (what) 2) style (diction, syntax, sounds, rhyme scheme, etc) (how)

8 Tone has a significant place in literature as it manifests writers’ attitude toward different subjects. Example #1: Holden Caulfield in J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher and the Rye” unfolds his personality through the tone he adopts throughout the novel: “All morons hate it when you call them a moron.” “If a girl looks swell when she meets you, who gives a damn if she’s late? Nobody.” “Goddamn money. It always ends up making you blue as hell.” “Catholics are always trying to find out if you’re Catholic.” Holden’s tone is bitterly sarcastic as he criticizes the nature of things in real life. His character may reveal the attitude of the writer towards life as it is common for writers to use their characters as their mouthpieces.

9 Come live with me and be my Love, And we will all the pleasures prove That hills and valleys, dale and field, And all the craggy mountains yield. There will we sit upon the rocks And see the shepherds feed their flocks, By shallow rivers, to whose falls Melodious birds sing madrigals. There will I make thee beds of roses And a thousand fragrant posies, A cap of flowers, and a kirtle Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle. A gown made of the finest wool Which from our pretty lambs we pull, Fair linèd slippers for the cold, With buckles of the purest gold. A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my Love. Thy silver dishes for thy meat As precious as the gods do eat, Shall on an ivory table be Prepared each day for thee and me. The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May-morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my Love.

10 If all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love. Time drives the flocks from field to fold When rivers rage and rocks grow cold, And Philomel becometh dumb; The rest complains of cares to come. The flowers do fade, and wanton fields To wayward winter reckoning yields; A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall, Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten-- In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee and be thy love. But could youth last and love still breed, Had joys no date nor age no need, Then these delights my mind might move To live with thee and be thy love.

11 Tone Time drives the flocks from field to fold When rivers rage and rocks grow cold, And Philomel becometh dumb; The rest complains of cares to come. The flowers do fade, and wanton fields To wayward winter reckoning yields; A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy’s spring, but sorrow’s fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten – In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Q: In the second stanza, the Shepherd describes a quiet scene of relaxation and beauty – shepherds feeding their flocks by a river while birds sing. Again the Nymph replies using the same images. But what has now happened to the flocks? What is the state of the river? What has happened to the bird songs? In which season do you think the Shepherd describes his scene? To which season is the Nymph referring?

12 Philomela—figure in Greek mythology, after being raped (& having her tongue cut out) is transformed into nightingale to forever sing of what happened to her Can read most complete story in Ovid’s Metamorphoses: Still my revenge shall take its proper time, And suit the baseness of your hellish crime. My self, abandon'd, and devoid of shame, Thro' the wide world your actions will proclaim; Or tho' I'm prison'd in this lonely den, Obscur'd, and bury'd from the sight of men, My mournful voice the pitying rocks shall move, And my complainings echo thro' the grove. Hear me, o Heav'n! and, if a God be there, Let him regard me, and accept my pray'r.

13 Raleigh Was Right We cannot go into the country for the country will bring us no peace What can the small violets tell us that grow on furry stems in the long grass amoung lance shaped leaves? Though you praise us and call to mind the poets who sung of our loveliness it was long ago! long ago! when country people would plow and sow with flowering minds and pockets at ease — if ever this were true. Not now. Love itself a flower with roots in a parched ground. Empty pockets make empty heads. Cure it if you can but do not believe that we can live today in the country for the country will bring us no peace — William Carlos Williams Invitation Come live with me and be my last Resource, location and resort, My workday's focus and steadfast Distraction to a weekend's sport. Come end up with me, close my list; Blank my black book, block every From ex-loves whose mouths won't be missed; Let nothing else alive look female. Come couch with me mit Freud und Lust As every evening's last connection; Talk to me; prove the day like Proust; Let what comes next rise to inspection. Come, let old aftermaths get lost, Let failures and betrayals mend, Cancel repayments; clear the cost; Once more unto the breach, dear friend. Come lay us down to sleep at least, Sharing this pillow's picture show; Who's been my braintrust and best beast? Who else knows what I need to know? —W. D. Snodgrass

14 “Ask not—we cannot know—what end the gods have set for you, for me; nor attempt the Babylonian reckonings Leuconoë. How much better to endure whatever comes, whether Jupiter grants us additional winters or whether this is our last, which now wears out the Tuscan Sea upon the barrier of the cliffs! Be wise, strain the wine; and since life is brief, prune back far-reaching hopes! Even while we speak, envious time has passed: pluck the day, putting as little trust as possible in tomorrow!” —Horace, “Carpe Diem” Ode Carpe diem? How do Marlowe and Raleigh suggest to best live life?


Download ppt "E28A: The Poetic Imagination Carpe Diem Oct. 8. 2014."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google