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Linear Impulse − Momentum Chapter 8 KINE 3301 Biomechanics of Human Movement.

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Presentation on theme: "Linear Impulse − Momentum Chapter 8 KINE 3301 Biomechanics of Human Movement."— Presentation transcript:

1 Linear Impulse − Momentum Chapter 8 KINE 3301 Biomechanics of Human Movement

2 Definitions Momentum: mass x velocity (units kg∙m/s) Conservation of Linear Momentum – The total linear momentum of a system of objects is constant if the net force acting on a system is zero. Elastic Collision: The objects collide and rebound. Inelastic Collision: The objects collide and stick together. Impulse (units N∙s) – Constant force: Average force x time. – Non-Constant force: Area under the force – time curve. Impulse – Momentum: The impulse is equal to the change in momentum.

3 Equations p = m v Elastic Collisions Inelastic Collisions Impulse Impulse−Momentum Linear Momentum

4 The linear momentum (p) of an object is the product of it’s mass (m) and velocity (v). The units for linear momentum are kg∙m/s. m = 2 kg v = 3 m/s p = m v p = (2 kg) (3 m/s) p = +6 kg∙m/s p The vector for linear momentum points in the same direction as the velocity.

5 Conservation of Linear Momentum The total linear momentum of a system of objects is constant if the net force acting on a system is zero. The total linear momentum is defined by:

6 Collision Classifications Collisions are classified according to whether the kinetic energy changes during the collision. The two classifications are elastic and inelastic. In an elastic collision the total kinetic energy of the system is the same before and after the collision. In an a perfectly inelastic collision the total kinetic energy is still conserved but the two objects stick together and move with the same velocity.

7 Conservation of Linear Momentum The equation above is usually rearranged for elastic and inelastic collisions as follows: Elastic Collisions Inelastic Collisions

8 Two billiard balls collide in a perfectly elastic collision. Ball A has a mass of 0.8 kg and an initial velocity (u A ) of 3 m/s, ball B has a mass of 0.3 kg and an initial velocity (u B ) of −2 m/s, determine the velocity of each ball after the collision.

9 Two clay objects collide in an inelastic collision, object A has a mass of 0.8 kg and an initial velocity (u A ) of 4 m/s, object B has a mass of 0.4 kg and an initial velocity (u B ) of −2 m/s, determine the final velocity of A and B.

10 Constant Force Non−Constant Force Computing Impulse Impulse = Average Force x time Impulse = area under force-time curve

11 Impulse

12 Computing Impulse using Average Force

13 Impulse-Momentum The impulse – momentum relationship is derived from Newton’s law of acceleration. Impulse = change in momentum

14 A soccer player imparts the force shown below on a soccer ball with a mass of 0.43 kg and an initial velocity (V i ) of 0.0 m/s. After the force was applied the ball had a final velocity (V f ) of m/s. The average force F of 90.8 N was applied for s. Compute the impulse using both average force and the change in momentum.

15 A softball player imparts the force shown below on a softball with a mass of kg and an initial velocity (V i ) of 0.0 m/s. After the force was applied the ball had a final velocity (V f ) of m/s. The average force F of N was applied for s. Compute the impulse using both average force and the change in momentum.

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