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Introduction: Aram Saroyan Armstrong. Playing midwife to Service Design and Entertainment. AHA! Thesis Advisors: Jan-Christoph Zoels and Simona Maschi.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction: Aram Saroyan Armstrong. Playing midwife to Service Design and Entertainment. AHA! Thesis Advisors: Jan-Christoph Zoels and Simona Maschi."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction: Aram Saroyan Armstrong. Playing midwife to Service Design and Entertainment. AHA! Thesis Advisors: Jan-Christoph Zoels and Simona Maschi

2 Service Design? An old practice, but new design discipline. “Design of experiences that reach people through many different touch-points, and that happen over time.” livework live|work, ideo, the design council, IDII, IIT, politecnico di milano, cologne international school of design Illustration credit: Brian Callanan Photo credit: Österreichischen Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum,Photo credit: Rob Miracle Photo credit: Lee A.James Sr.

3 Service Design as Entertainment: Smoke, mirrors, and sex appeal. What can service design learn from the world of entertainment? Using the qualities of entertainment such as production value, humor, storyline to make services more attractive, enjoyable experiences. Illustration credit: Brian Callanan Photo credit: Österreichischen Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum,

4 Service Design as Entertainment: Engaging the 5 Senses “Enhance the blueprint by looking at the ‘sensory’ side of the customer experience. At each stage of the experience what does the customer see, hear, smell, touch or taste? By improving each of these the customer experience is enhanced.” – Hollins & Hollins Illustration credit: Brian Callanan

5 Entertainment as Service Design: Alternative models for art and entertainment. How can service design save the entertainers? Building a structure around new forms of entertainment that provides support and rewards authors for creating public works. Illustration credit: Brian Callanan Photo credit: Österreichischen Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum,Photo credit: Rob Miracle

6 Entertainment as Service Design: Lessons from the Luau Am I selling tickets to the experience or making a domain for tourist services to be offered? People pay for guided-tours, themed-dinners, and special activities. Their hosts often make tips or earn commissions as reward. Illustration credit: Brian Callanan Photo credit: Österreichischen Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum,Photo credit: Rob Miracle Photo credit: Lee A.James Sr.

7 Mogi-Mogi: Game as Tour Guide? “All the trips I make in the city are now randomized, as I will often divert a few hundred meters to go and collect an object around me. I get a chance to discover parts of the city that I ignored, a motivation to check out that parallel street I never took.” — Paul Baron, Mogi enthusiast.

8 Another Introduction: AHA is exploring (alternate) (mixed-reality) (locative) (pervasive) games. AHA! Co-conspirators: Haiyan Zhang and Alejandro Zamudio

9 Let’s try the video!

10 Game as Cultural Environment: Permeable boundaries in ARGs. “A schema that interrogates the relationship between the artificial world of games and the ‘real life’ context.” – Katie Salen and Eric Zimmerman, Rules of Play.

11 Rumble of the Future: A location-based ghost hunting ARG. (probe) AHA! Rumble of the Future is a deconstructed narrative that uses Myungdong as the stage for lesson on modern Korean history told by the Myungdong Historical Society (MHS), an organization which exists, on the surface, to preserve historic landmarks of the area and promote cultural appreciation for the area through guided tours, a website archive of materials, and partnerships with local businesses. source photo credit: Robert Calve

12 Game Mechanics: Hungry ghosts and Silver bullets. Acolyte or Assassin? Feed the ghost’s desire to give it power: Friendship, Food, Celebrity, Gossip, etc… Find the ghost’s secret to release it from this world: the Orphan, the Glutton, the Backstabber, the Blabbermouth, etc… 휘팅!휘팅! 휘팅!휘팅! 휘팅!휘팅!

13 A Narrative-based Structure: There is a beginning and one end. Examples: IloveBees, The Beast, The Heist. Pros: You can carefully craft the story and are in complete control of the pacing. Cons: Once a puzzle is solved, it is solved for everyone and once the story is over, it’s over for everyone.

14 A Rule-based Structure: Simple rules, multiple outcomes. Examples: Starcraft, Go, Rock-Scissors-Paper. Pros: Excellent replay value and re- use of game elements. Cons: Story is a secondary concern, if not irrelevant to game play.

15 Hybrid Game-Narrative Structure: Modular systems of narrative subject to rules. “Beads on a string — but multiple paths within each bead.” Greg Costikyan, CEO Manifesto Games

16 Psychogeography meets Psychictourism “Psychogeography includes just about anything that takes pedestrians off their predictable paths and jolts them into a new awareness of the urban landscape.” — Joseph Hart Psychictourism: Travel in search of the spirit world? An invisible layer on top of this reality.

17 The Dead Can Wait: It’s a slow game that allows casual participation. Play at your own pace: Using the limitations of the technology to our advantage. Persistent world that forgives and forgets.

18 Traces Not Faces: Fear of the Unknown The power of suggestion: We don’t show people in ghost costumes. We present them with evidence of ghosts and let the player’s imagination run wild.

19 Ubiquitous Interface: Keyplaces In the City: Find an location or object in the environment Marked by QR code or RFiD embedded in places and on objects

20 Ubiquitous Interface: Keywords On your mobile Human/AI/Chatbot SMS interaction. Receive directions, info, and clues.

21 Stakeholders: The value exchange ART CENTER NABI GIVES: oversight and project management GETS: continual exposure in myungdong CITY OF SEOUL GIVES: manages relationship with local vendors GETS: cultural attraction for locals and tourists UNESCO GIVES: support and historical resource GETS: venue for promoting local heritage PLAYERS GIVES: time and money to play the game GETS: a strange new environment to explore VENDORS GIVES: players special deals and secret clues GETS: more customers GAME DESIGNERS GIVES: mind, body, and soul to building the game GETS: experience and the chance to make it real Stakeholders: The Value exchange SK TELECOM GIVES: technological solutions GETS: increased traffic and a test case S ervice Ecology: A service ecology is a system of actors and the relationships between them that form a service. Sustainable service ecologies depend on a balance where the actors involved exchange value in ways that is mutually beneficial over time. – Ben Reason, Live|Work

22 Stakeholders: The value exchange INITIAL DESIGN PROTOTYPING CONCEPT Timeline: The 3 Phases To: From: Subject: Next Steps The big issue which needs to be tackled with the proposal and which also relates to my thesis topic is basically how to make it work from a producers perspective. Who pays for it, how and why... and can the benefits equal or exceed the cost of producing it (also how to scale down the team or human resources required). It could be approached from the standpoint of tourism, supported by the city government, or entertainment, as a content offering from a service provider like SK telecom. So, to get further insight…


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