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9/17/14 Do Now: Take out your homework. (Notes for Socratic and Socratic reflections) Homework: None Objective: Students will gain understanding of J.D.

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Presentation on theme: "9/17/14 Do Now: Take out your homework. (Notes for Socratic and Socratic reflections) Homework: None Objective: Students will gain understanding of J.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 9/17/14 Do Now: Take out your homework. (Notes for Socratic and Socratic reflections) Homework: None Objective: Students will gain understanding of J.D. Salinger and The Catcher in the Rye. Students will gain understanding of American life in the 1950’s

2 Introduction to J.D. Salinger’s: The Catcher in the Rye

3 J.D. Salinger 1919 – – 2010 Has written several books about young people including The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey Has written several books about young people including The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey Served in WWII Served in WWII Stopped giving interviews in Stopped giving interviews in 1980.

4 J.D. Salinger Born in NYC to parents Sol and Miriam: father was Jewish, mother, Catholic Born in NYC to parents Sol and Miriam: father was Jewish, mother, Catholic Jerome David Salinger Jerome David Salinger Recognized as one of the most popular and influential authors of American fiction during the second half of the twentieth century. Recognized as one of the most popular and influential authors of American fiction during the second half of the twentieth century. Has, by his own choice, remained out of the public eye for most of his life. Has, by his own choice, remained out of the public eye for most of his life.

5 - Born January 1, 1919 to the family of a prosperous Manhattan food dealer, Salinger had one older sister. He was educated in New York City except for the last two years of high school. These final years were spent at Valley Forge Military Academy in Pennsylvania. - Information about his first six years after graduation is vague. Salinger may have visited Europe and is known to have studied sporadically at New York University, Ursinus College, and Columbia University, concentrating on writing courses. During this time, Salinger published several short stories in popular magazines. J.D. Salinger

6 Salinger moved to rural New Hampshire and lived as a recluse. He only saw local youngsters, whose company he enjoyed. Although the success of his one novel, The Catcher in the Rye (1951), brought him unwanted attention, he kept the public eye at bay by refusing all visitors. However, whenever he was trapped, he offered conflicting (or often totally false) biographical information. Salinger moved to rural New Hampshire and lived as a recluse. He only saw local youngsters, whose company he enjoyed. Although the success of his one novel, The Catcher in the Rye (1951), brought him unwanted attention, he kept the public eye at bay by refusing all visitors. However, whenever he was trapped, he offered conflicting (or often totally false) biographical information. Drafted in 1942 and trained in England, Salinger participated in the D-Day invasion. He continued to write during this period and more stories appeared in print. There was also an alleged marriage to a Frenchwoman, which supposedly ended in divorce in Drafted in 1942 and trained in England, Salinger participated in the D-Day invasion. He continued to write during this period and more stories appeared in print. There was also an alleged marriage to a Frenchwoman, which supposedly ended in divorce in J.D. Salinger

7 “Salinger is a writer, first and last. He adamantly rejects the role of a public figure. He also rejects the position of teacher, refusing to talk about his writing or instruct others on his methods. Although Salinger has retreated from the world, his work offers great immediacy and reality… In addition, his ability to capture the motivations and desires of the soul show that he has an intuitive grasp of the human character.” J.D. Salinger

8 The Catcher in the Rye Published in 1951 Published in 1951 Has sold over 65 million copies world wide! Has sold over 65 million copies world wide! Despite its popular success, the critical response to The Catcher in the Rye was slow in getting underway. Despite its popular success, the critical response to The Catcher in the Rye was slow in getting underway. One of the most frequently challenged books in library history because of sex and vulgar language. One of the most frequently challenged books in library history because of sex and vulgar language. Named one of the best novels of the 20 th century by Time Magazine. Named one of the best novels of the 20 th century by Time Magazine.

9 Reasons for Banning? Until 2006, Catcher was one of the most frequently banned books. Until 2006, Catcher was one of the most frequently banned books. Mark David Chapman (assassin of John Lennon) and John Hinckley Jr. (attempted assassin of President Ronald Reagan) both had copies of the book in their pockets when they were arrested. Mark David Chapman (assassin of John Lennon) and John Hinckley Jr. (attempted assassin of President Ronald Reagan) both had copies of the book in their pockets when they were arrested.

10 The Catcher in the Rye Tells the story of a teenager expelled from his high school and his journey across NYC in the 1950’s. Tells the story of a teenager expelled from his high school and his journey across NYC in the 1950’s. Issues discussed in the book include: school, teachers, music, sex, alcohol, hypocrisy, family, and being a teenager. Issues discussed in the book include: school, teachers, music, sex, alcohol, hypocrisy, family, and being a teenager. A story is about Holden Caulfield, the 16 year old protagonist of the novel, and his experiences in school and New York City. A story is about Holden Caulfield, the 16 year old protagonist of the novel, and his experiences in school and New York City.

11 Similarities between J.D. Salinger and Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salinger attended prep schools in NYC and flunked out of McBurney School at 13 J.D. Salinger attended prep schools in NYC and flunked out of McBurney School at 13 He attended Valley Forge Military Academy and graduated at 15 He attended Valley Forge Military Academy and graduated at 15 He has been referred to as a terrible liar, though this is difficult to prove/disprove He has been referred to as a terrible liar, though this is difficult to prove/disprove Alienation from society– Salinger seems determined to keep his life private from outsiders. Alienation from society– Salinger seems determined to keep his life private from outsiders.

12 Point of View First-person limited- we see this story only through Holden’s eyes First-person limited- we see this story only through Holden’s eyes “You”- the psychoanalyst and the reader “You”- the psychoanalyst and the reader Stream of Consciousness; many digressions Stream of Consciousness; many digressions Dialect- Salinger perfected the dialect of the teenage boy Dialect- Salinger perfected the dialect of the teenage boy –This language is the cause of much controversy over the book –This creates a very believable character

13 Course Themes Within Catcher Conformity vs. Resistance Conformity vs. Resistance IDENTITY FORMATION IDENTITY FORMATION Perception of Truth Perception of Truth Changes in Values over Time Changes in Values over Time Watch for these themes during your reading of the novel. You will be expected to pull examples of each theme out of the novel.

14 Dominant Symbols The Carousel The Carousel The Red Hunting Cap The Red Hunting Cap The Catcher’s Mitt The Catcher’s Mitt The Ducks in Central Park Pond The Ducks in Central Park Pond The Museum of Natural History The Museum of Natural History Pencey Prep Pencey Prep

15 What to look for while reading? This novel is a character study of Holden. This novel is a character study of Holden. –Analyze Holden’s motivations, his personality, and his mental stability. –What’s Holden’s deal? Is there something wrong with him (is he crazy?) or is he a just a normal teenager?

16 The 1950’s The United States in the 1950s experienced marked economic growth - with an increase in manufacturing and home construction amongst a post-World War II economic boom. The United States in the 1950s experienced marked economic growth - with an increase in manufacturing and home construction amongst a post-World War II economic boom. The Cold War and its associated conflicts helped create a politically conservative climate in the country. Fear of communism caused public Congressional hearings in both houses in Congress and there was a strong anti-communism sentiment in the United States throughout the period. The Cold War and its associated conflicts helped create a politically conservative climate in the country. Fear of communism caused public Congressional hearings in both houses in Congress and there was a strong anti-communism sentiment in the United States throughout the period. Conformity and conservatism characterized the social mores of the time. Accordingly, the 1950s in the United States are generally considered both socially conservative and highly materialistic in nature. Conformity and conservatism characterized the social mores of the time. Accordingly, the 1950s in the United States are generally considered both socially conservative and highly materialistic in nature. The 1950s are noted in United States history as a time of compliance, conformity and also, to a lesser extent, of rebellion. The 1950s are noted in United States history as a time of compliance, conformity and also, to a lesser extent, of rebellion.

17 The classic American family The classic American family Family roles were fairly traditional in Salinger’s day: Dad was the sole provider and the head of the household Mom was most often a homemaker – cooking, cleaning and taking care of her husband and kids

18 And the kids? Education was much less of a priority than it is today. Education was much less of a priority than it is today. If the kids finished high school, college was a relatively rare option. If the kids finished high school, college was a relatively rare option. –Getting a job and getting married straight out of high school were much more common. –How does this compare to your plans?

19 What changed? After World War II ended (1945), the old- school family structure and roles started to change a bit After World War II ended (1945), the old- school family structure and roles started to change a bit –Victorious war effort left the U.S. much more financially stable…people had money again! Woohoo! –And what do people do when they have money?

20 Spend it! In the late 1940s/early 50s, there were two consumer products that helped to create our modern concept of the teenager: In the late 1940s/early 50s, there were two consumer products that helped to create our modern concept of the teenager: –The television –The automobile

21 Hmmmm… So, how would an increase in TV and car purchases change American families? So, how would an increase in TV and car purchases change American families? And more specifically, how would these purchases impact teenagers? And more specifically, how would these purchases impact teenagers? –(insert brainstorm here)

22 TVs/Hollywood Advertising split Americans into demographics (men, women, old, young, teen, etc.) Advertising split Americans into demographics (men, women, old, young, teen, etc.) “Family time” changed “Family time” changed Different shows appealed to different ages Different shows appealed to different ages Attractive people – the pin-ups Attractive people – the pin-ups

23 1950sNow Ryan Gosling Marilyn Monroe James Dean Megan Fox

24 1950s Elvis Presley Now Justin Timberlake

25 Cars More accessible + more affordable Detract from family Sense of freedom Images of “cool” Emergence of fast food Possibilities for drinking + sex

26 The new teenager So all in all, the 1950s saw the birth of “the modern teenagers,” as we think of them So all in all, the 1950s saw the birth of “the modern teenagers,” as we think of them Holden Caulfield, the narrator of The Catcher in the Rye, is arguably the first modern teenager of literature. Holden Caulfield, the narrator of The Catcher in the Rye, is arguably the first modern teenager of literature.

27 Key questions as we read Catcher: What are the pros, cons and responsibilities of each age group? What are the pros, cons and responsibilities of each age group? Why does Holden have such a difficult time fitting in? Why does Holden have such a difficult time fitting in? What makes Holden so relatable as a narrator? What makes Holden so relatable as a narrator? Similarities/differences between Holden’s issues and the issues of today’s teens? Similarities/differences between Holden’s issues and the issues of today’s teens? What are Holden’s priorities? Why? What are Holden’s priorities? Why? How does J.D. Salinger use symbolism to help develop his themes over the course of the novel? How does J.D. Salinger use symbolism to help develop his themes over the course of the novel?


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