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Elevators & Fire Alarm Systems: Understanding Interface Requirements Presented by: Antonio Torres- North Central Regional Sales Manager.

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Presentation on theme: "Elevators & Fire Alarm Systems: Understanding Interface Requirements Presented by: Antonio Torres- North Central Regional Sales Manager."— Presentation transcript:

1 Elevators & Fire Alarm Systems: Understanding Interface Requirements Presented by: Antonio Torres- North Central Regional Sales Manager

2 Learning Objectives At the end of this program, participants will be able to: Improve installation coordination by identifying which elevators are subject to recall operations utilizing ASME 17.1 and 17.3 Improve installation coordination by identifying which elevators are subject to recall operations utilizing ASME 17.1 and 17.3 Eliminate job site ambiguities by incorporating code compliant sprinkler and fire alarm designs per NFPA 13, 72 and ASME 17.1(3) Eliminate job site ambiguities by incorporating code compliant sprinkler and fire alarm designs per NFPA 13, 72 and ASME 17.1(3)

3 Learning Objectives (cont.) At the end of this program, participants will be able to: Ensure proper design by correctly locating building systems control and annunciation equipment using ASME 17.1(3), NFPA 72 and municipal codes Understand recall sequence requirements and specify accordingly per ASME 17.1(3), NFPA 72 and municipal codes

4 Let’s get started!

5 1. When it’s required 2. How it’s initiated 3. Installation requirements Recall Codes & Standards

6 Elevator Recall Definition  The override of an automatic elevator’s operation by a building's fire safety system upon activation of a specific set of initiation devices.

7 Purpose of Elevator Recall  Safety of the public Prevents travel to fire floor Prevents occupants from getting trapped in car Controlled stoppage of cabs  Firefighters’ use Cars available upon arrival Cars available upon arrival Can be key initiated if not activated Can be key initiated if not activated

8 When is recall required? New Installations:  The original requirement was in the 1973 supplement to ASME A  Required recall when car traveled 25 feet above or below designated level

9 When is recall required? New Installations:  The 1992 supplement to A revised the recall requirements  The 25 foot requirement allowance was eliminated  All automatic elevators must now recall regardless of travel distance

10 When is recall required? Existing Installations:  If capability is not present, no recall required unless:  Equipment is substantially altered in some other fashion  Equipment fails  Equipment is deemed unsafe by the municipality

11 Systems that initiate recall sequence  Required building fire alarm system  Used for recalling the elevators  Has fire alarm notification duties  Co-located with the elevator control and status panel

12 Systems that initiate recall sequence  Local System  If no alarm system exists, a system with the sole purpose of recalling the elevators may be installed Marked "Elevator Recall Control and Supervisory Panel." Marked "Elevator Recall Control and Supervisory Panel." No occupant evacuation notification No occupant evacuation notification Not monitored by central station Not monitored by central station

13 Installation standards  ANSI/ASME A17.1, A17.3 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators  NFPA 101, 72, 13, 70  Local or state adopted rules May not be part of your building code Overseen by an official Elevator Inspection Department

14 Installation standards  Electrical  Elevator shaft may be used for raceway if the circuitry serves elevator purposes only Elevator lobby smoke detectors Elevator lobby smoke detectors Top and bottom of hoistway detectors Top and bottom of hoistway detectors  Smoke detectors not allowed in unsprinkled hoistway unless opening a hoistway exhaust vent

15 Installation standards  Sprinkler  Chicago does not allow sprinklers in elevator machine rooms for required systems  Sprinklers in machine rooms & hoistway require a separate, system monitored shutoff valve and waterflow switch  Sprinkler heads in hoistway must be fed from the level it’s mounted on. Sprinkler risers are not allowed in the hoistway!

16 1. Terminology 2. How it’s initiated 3. Installation requirements Fireman’s Emergency Operations

17 1. Phase I (Recall) a.Primary Level b.Alternate Level 2. Phase II (Fireman’s Operation) 3. Fireman’s Hat 4. Shunt

18 Elevator Recall Floor Designations 1. Designated Level (Primary)  Main floor of direct egress  Egress must be at exterior grade 2. Alternate Level  Building egress available, not usually direct  Generally through exterior egress stairwells  Loading docks, parking garages

19 Elevator Recall Floor Designations  Designated Level (Primary) contains the following equipment: Firefighter’s Command Center (FCC) –Fire panel status and control –Emergency voice communication equipment –May contain graphic annunciation

20 Elevator Recall Floor Designations  Designated Level (Primary) contains: Elevator Annunciator Panel (EAP) –Shows car locations –May have recall key switches –AKA Elevator Control Panel (ECP)

21  Designated Level (Primary) contains: Aux controls –Fans HOA switches May show fan status May be located in FCC –Stairwell doors Usually located in FCC (always in Chicago) –Dampers Elevator Recall Floor Designations

22 1. Phase I  Also referred to as Elevator Recall  Car reports to appropriate level Primary Recall Primary Recall  Elevator lobby smoke detectors from any level above designated primary level  Detectors from pit if alternate level is below primary Fireman’s Emergency Operations

23 Primary Recall (cont.)Primary Recall (cont.)  Buzzer sounds continuously, fireman’s hat illuminates  Cab reports to primary floor  Doors automatically open, remain open Fireman’s Emergency Operations

24 1. Phase One (cont.)  Accomplished with two programmable relays  Can be activated manually via Firefighter’s recall switch at ECP or primary lobby  Lobby detector can be a supervisory type device if not part of public area coverage Fireman’s Emergency Operations

25 1. Phase One (cont.)  Municipal codes may require two cross zoned smoke detectors per elevator lobby Cross zoning not required per NFPA 72 nor ASME 17.1(3)  Waterflow may be used in Chicago if entire building is sprinkled  Only municipality may allow other devices to activate recall Fireman’s Emergency Operations

26 1. Phase I (cont.)  Alternate Recall Detectors from primary level elevator lobby Detectors from primary level elevator lobby Detectors from pit if alternate level is above primary level Detectors from pit if alternate level is above primary level Buzzer sounds continuously, fireman’s hat illuminates Buzzer sounds continuously, fireman’s hat illuminates Cab reports to AHJ approved alternate floor of egress Cab reports to AHJ approved alternate floor of egress Doors open, remain open Doors open, remain open Fireman’s Emergency Operations

27 Lobby Detector Location Locate smoke detector(s) within 21 feet of centerline of each elevator door of the bank under control of the detector

28 2. Phase II  Also referred to as Firefighter’s Service  Allows firefighters to use cars after Phase I has been activated  Cars are hand operated by firefighters  Key activated from inside the car  Employs “Dead Man Drop” door operation Fireman’s Emergency Operations

29 3. Fireman’s Hat  Detectors in machine room and/or hoistway activate sequence Smoke detectors not allowed in hoistways that are not sprinkled unless opening a hoistway exhaust vent Heat detectors may be used in hostile environments Fireman’s Emergency Operations

30 3. Fireman’s Hat  Warns firefighters that loss of elevator may be imminent  Sequence activates the flashing fireman’s hat in the car(s)  Accomplished with programmable relay Fireman’s Emergency Operations

31 4. Shunt Trip  Why do we need it? –Controlled shutdown before sprinklers –Water on brakes may cause: Brake failure Elevator car to stop between floors and leave the hoistway exposed –Door operation circuitry on top of cab could short circuit when wet, allowing cab to travel up and down with open doors Fireman’s Emergency Operations

32 4. Shunt Trip (cont.)  Sequence activates shutdown of elevator power  Heat detectors in machine room and/or hoistway activate sequence Dedicated, non-delayed waterflow may be used  Must be implemented if sprinklers are in machine room and/or hoistway  Power source of shunt trip activation must be monitored for availability by fire alarm system  Accomplished by programmable relay Fireman’s Emergency Operations

33 4. Shunt Trip (cont.)  Hoistway Sprinklers A. Head not required in pit if: Hoistway is an enclosed, non- combustible shaft No combustible hydralic fluids B.Head not required at top of shaft if: Hoistway is an enclosed, non- combustible (or limited combustible) shaft Cab enclosure materials meet ASME 17.1 Fireman’s Emergency Operations

34 4.Shunt Trip (cont.)  Rate-of-rise heat detector activates shunt trip Must be located within two feet of each sprinkler head Temperature rating below and sensitivity rating above that of the sprinkler –Sprinkler head is usually 165°, standard response –Heat detector is usually 135°, but can be adjusted –Sensitivity is Response Time Index (RTI) of both sprinkler head and heat detector If unknown, a fixed temperature heat detector used Fireman’s Emergency Operations

35 Typical Elevator Shunt Trip Wiring

36 A. Fireman’s Emergency Operations B. Fire alarm equipment needed C. Takeaways Elevator Emergency Operations Review

37 Review of Elevator Firefighter’s Emergency Operations 1. Phase I  Primary or alternate level recall  Remains at recall level until  Bypassed with key  Phase II activated with key  Fire panel reset 2. Phase II  Firefighter operates car via special key  Car remains on floor of travel until sequence repeated

38 Review of Elevator Firefighter’s Emergency Operations (cont.) 3. Firefighter’s Hat  Warns of possible fire in machine room and/or hoistway  Loss of car power may be imminent 4. Elevator Shutdown  Shunt trip  Newer equipment brings car to nearest floor to let occupants out before shunting power

39 Fire Alarm Interface Requirements 1. Phase I  Smoke detector(s) in each elevator lobby  Two addressable relays in elevator machine room (primary and alternate recall) 2. Phase II  None 3. Firefighter’s Hat  Smoke detector(s) in elevator machine room  Smoke detector in pit and top of shaft (if sprinkled)  Addressable relay in elevator machine room

40 Fire Alarm Interface Requirements 4. Elevator Shunt Trip (only if sprinkled)  Heat detector within 24” of each sprinkler head Elevator machine room Elevator machine room Pit Pit Top of shaft Top of shaft  Addressable relay in elevator machine room  High voltage relay powered by shunt power Some newer shunt trip breakers contain a relay Some newer shunt trip breakers contain a relay  Addressable module to monitor shunt power relay

41 1. All automatic elevators must recall. 2. All sprinkled elevators must shunt. 3. Check with municipality for any additional recall criteria. 4. Ensure coordination between fire alarm and elevator contractors. 5. Ensure the correct sequences are demonstrated before final elevator and occupancy inspections. Final Takeaways

42 Thanks for your participation. Questions? Antonio Torres


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