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Suggested Update to RF Standards Related to Wireless Communications Bob Curtis April 10, 2001.

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Presentation on theme: "Suggested Update to RF Standards Related to Wireless Communications Bob Curtis April 10, 2001."— Presentation transcript:

1 Suggested Update to RF Standards Related to Wireless Communications Bob Curtis April 10, 2001

2 What is Needed? Site-Specific RF Program Work site Safety and Health Programs should include an RF Program if significant exposures are possible. A priority, because S&H Programs can be very effective in preventing excessive exposures.

3 Basic Requirements Implement an RF program where exposures exceed FCC “General Population” or Public limits (see following slides). The RF Program must ensure employee exposure does not exceed FCC “Occupational” limits.

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6 Extent of RF Program is Based on Exposure Locations are Categorized (I-V) based on potential exposures. Many RF exposure situations require no, or a limited RF Safety Program. (Categories I-II) More extensive program elements for higher exposure categories.

7 Category I Areas Locations where RF fields are too weak to cause exposures greater than the FCC general population (public) limits. No dependence on controls, including time averaging. NO RF SAFETY PROGRAM NEEDED!!

8 Category II Areas Potential exposures are controlled to ensure compliance with FCC Public limits. Must maintain controls, such as time averaging and shielding, to remain below public limits.

9 Category III Areas Locations where RF fields are too weak to cause exposures greater than the FCC Occupational limits. No dependence on controls, including time averaging.

10 Category IV Areas Potential exposures are controlled to ensure compliance with FCC Occupational limits. Must maintain controls, such as time averaging and shielding, to remain below Occupational limits.

11 Category V Areas Exposure conditions which can not be controlled to comply with FCC Occupational limits. Includes surfaces which will cause serious RF burns if contacted.

12 Summary Tables of Program Elements Needed for Each Exposure Category

13 Administrative PolicyNNYes Accountable Person NNYes DocumentationNNYes, for incidents Yes Employee Involvement NNNoOpt.Yes RF Safety Committee NNNoOpt. Procurement of RF Source Equipment NNYes I II III IV V

14 Identification of Potential Hazards Inventory of RF Sources NNYes Exposure Assessment NNInitial, + after change Yes I II III IV V

15 Controls/Engineering Utilize low exposure Equip. & Site Configuration NNYes Access Restriction NNOpt. Yes Maintenance of Controls NNYes I II III IV V

16 Controls/Administrative Use of Signs NNYes Access Restriction NNOpt.NNOpt.Yes Work Practices NNNoOpt. Control of Source Power (LOTO) NNNo Opt. I II III IV V

17 Controls/Administrative (cont.) Personal Monitors NNNoOpt. No Incident Response NNYes Medical Devices & Implants Personal Respon- sibilty Personal Respon- sibility Yes, make aware Yes Maintenance of Controls NNYes for Public NN for work. Yes I II III IV V

18 Personal Protective Equipment Selection of PPE NNNo Opt.When used Maintenance, Use, & Accessibility NNNo When used I II III IV V

19 Training Explanation for RF Exposure Limits NN Yes Use & Maintenance of Controls NNYes, for RFSO Yes Recognizing Abnormal Conditions NNYes, for RFSO Yes Sources of Additional Information NNYes, for RFSO Yes I II III IV V

20 Program Review Adequacy of Present Program Design NNYes Implementation (Program in use?) NNYes I II III IV V

21 Examples of the RF Safety Program Elements

22 Core Program Elements Administrative Identification of Potential Hazards Controls Engineering Administrative Personal Protective Equipment Training Program Review

23 Administrative Policy Management Commitment Authority to enforce rules Accountable Persons Assignment of Duties Documentation Employee Involvement RF Safety Committee Procurement of RF Source Equipment

24 Identification of Potential Hazards Inventory of RF Sources Exposure Assessment To establish exposure categories. To ensure controls are functioning.

25 Hazard Assessment Options Direct Measurement Indirect “Measurement” by comparing to similar sites. Model calculations

26 Direct Measurement

27 From Ric Tell PPE and Direct Measurement

28 Assess by modeling.

29 Assess by comparison. For example, cellulars are well characterized. (See examples at end)

30 Controls/Engineering Utilize low exposure equipment & site configuration –Use good equipment –Control hazard areas –Limit exposures Access Restriction Maintenance of Controls

31 Controls/Administrative Use of Signs Access Restriction Work Practices Control of Power Source (LOTO) Personal Monitors Incident Response Medical Devices and Implants Maintenance of Controls

32 Slides of Example Controls Lockout/Tag out Personal alarm Prevent access to hazardous locations (Signs & Fences) Administrative control program Protective clothing

33 Lock Out / Tag Out

34 Lock Out / Tag Out Offers Protection for Workers on Tower

35 Personal Alarm

36 Cooperative RF Program for Shared Tower

37 Cooperative RF Program for Multiple Broadcasters

38 Fence to Limit Access

39 RF Protective Suits

40 PPE Must Be Tested for Application

41 From Ric Tell PPE Must Be Inspected & Maintained

42 Example Application of Signs Based on Exposure Category

43 Sign at entrance to next exposure Category.

44 Notice for Public required by FCC. Sign posted at boundary between Category I & II.

45 Optional Notice of Worker-based RF Control Program. Posted at access points into Category III.

46 Caution workers to use Controls Posted at access points into Category IV locations.

47 Alert to objects which may cause RF shock if contacted without PPE.

48 Alert to objects which will cause RF Burns if contacted without PPE

49 Posted to mark prohibited access into Category V without power- down or PPE. Note: Wrong symbol.

50 Posted to mark prohibited access without power-down. PPE is not sufficient.

51 Alert to objects which will cause severe RF Burns if contacted. PPE may not be sufficient.

52 RF Personal Protective Equipment If PPE is utilized, a PPE Program must ensure its effectiveness, including proper: Selection of RF PPE within tested capabilities. Accessibility, Use, & Maintenance.

53 Training: What to Teach Location of sources and potentially hazardous areas. Health effects and safety standards. Extent of exposures compared to standards and common sources. Required SOP’s and controls. Emergency procedures. How to know when things are “abnormal”. Optional controls employees may use.

54 Program Review Adequacy of Program Design Program Implementation Interview employees –What are the hazards and controls? –What steps have been taken to enforce the rules? Determine what to change, add, and delete.

55 Possible Non-Mandatory Appendices Example RF Safety Program for a communications company which routinely services/installs antennas on rooftops. Appendices concerning PPE and signage

56 Example Applications

57 Category I Locations Most people, including workers, are in Category I locations. Therefore, most locations do not need an RF Safety Program.

58 Receiving Antenna or Dish

59 Anti-Theft Device

60 Computer Work Station

61 Wireless Local Area Network

62 Inside Office Building

63 RF Exposure Location with Multiple Categories (2 slides)

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65 Exposure Locations Broken wave guide V Between emitter and focal point IV On satellite dish III Inside fence II Outside the fence I

66 Cell Tower

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71 Miscellaneous Slides

72 Draft Host Employer’s Responsibilities Provide information about hazards, controls, safety and health rules, and emergency procedures to all employers at the workplace Ensure that safety and health responsibilities are assigned as appropriate to other employers at the workplace.

73 Draft Contract Employer’s Responsibilities Ensure that the host employer is aware of the hazards associated with the contract employer’s work and what the contract employer is doing to address them Advise the host employer of any previously unidentified hazards that the contact employer identifies at the workplace.

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79 Hazcom Program should exist for “Uncommonly High” Fields, such as: >50 mG whole body ELF >Uncontrolled limits of FCC

80 Applicable OSHA Standards 23 States have their own OSHA Standards –Standards must be at least as strict as Feds –Most copy Federal standards & interpretations –Some require a Safety and Health Program Non-Ionizing Radiation –10 mW/sq.cm, 6 min. average, 10M- 100GHz –No spatial averaging –Uses voluntary language of 1966 ANSI –Mandates look of RF Sign

81 Applicable OSHA Standards (cont.) Telecommunication Industry –Primarily safety requirements, such as electrical –Mandates compliance for GHz –Describes “Tagout” of antenna MHz , 20 - Construction Industry –Includes tower erection, repairs and painting –Limits MW to 10 mW/sq.cm. (no averaging) –Requires Programs to provide safe work to employees and contractors; includes inspection

82 Applicable OSHA Standards (cont.) Lockout/Tagout of Power –Requires lockout or tagout of power during maintenance to prevent excessive exposures Personal Protective Equipment –Requires hazard assessment to select appropriate PPE –Interpretation letter addresses RF Clothing , Signs and Tags –Use signs to warn of hazards

83 Applicable OSHA Standards (cont.) Record Keeping –Log of injuries and illnesses, accidents Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records Section 5(a)(1) of OSH Act –Requires a safe and healthful workplace free of recognized serious hazards

84 Obviously Outdated Exposure Limit is from 1966 ANSI –Not frequency dependent –Does not address induced current limits Incomplete on Hazard Communication –Describes RF Sign but not where to use it –One Warning sign for all conditions Incomplete on RF Safety Program Elements

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90 Policy Issues “Action” Level at FCC or 50% of Maximum


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