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C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS L OGIC P ROGRAMMING with P ROLOG Claus Brabrand IT University of Copenhagen [

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Presentation on theme: "C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS L OGIC P ROGRAMMING with P ROLOG Claus Brabrand IT University of Copenhagen ["— Presentation transcript:

1 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS L OGIC P ROGRAMMING with P ROLOG Claus Brabrand IT University of Copenhagen [ ] "Programming Paradigms", Dept. of Computer Science, Aalborg Uni. (Fall 2009)

2 [ 2 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Plan for Today Lecture: "Lists and Arithmetic" ( 10:15 – 11:00 ) Exercise 1, 2, and 3 ( 11:15 – 12:00 ) Lunch break ( 12:00 – 12:30 ) Lecture: "Reversibility, Cut, Negation, and Language Interpretation" ( 12:30 – 13:15 ) Lecture: "Non-termination and Undecidability” ( 13:30 – 14:00 ) Exercises 4, 5, and 6 ( 14:15 – 16:15 )

3 [ 3 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Outline Part 1: Lists Arithmetic Part 2: Reversibility Cut and Negation Language Interpretation Part 3: Non-termination Undecidability

4 [ 4 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Resolution: 1. Search knowledge base (from top to bottom) for (axiom or rule head) matching with (first) goal: Axiom match: remove goal and process next goal [  1] Rule match: (as in this case): [  2] No match: backtrack (= undo; try next choice in 1.)[  1] 2. "  -convert" variables (to avoid name clashes, later): Goal  : (record “ Y = _G225 ”) Match  : [  3] 3. Replace goal with rule body: Now resolve new goals (from left to right); [  1] f(a). f(b). g(a). g(b). h(b). k(X) :- f(X),g(X),h(X). k(Y) rule head rule body axioms (5x) rule (1x) k(X) :- f(X),g(X),h(X). k(_G225) :- f(_G225),g(_G225),h(_G225). k(_G225) f(_G225),g(_G225),h(_G225). Possible outcomes: - success: no more goals to match (all matched w/ axioms and removed) - failure: unmatched goal (tried all possibilities: exhaustive backtracking) - non-termination: inherent risk (same- / bigger-and-bigger- / more-and-more -goals) P ROLOG 's Search Order

5 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS L ISTS Keywords: (Encoded) lists, (built-in) lists, efficiency issues,...

6 [ 6 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Lists (home-made) Lists are easily represented: // empty list // construct new list from element and list Example: The list [1,2,3] may be represented as: i.e., "representation of information" Now, let's look at: nil cons(E,L) cons(1, cons(2, cons(3, nil))) "Transformation of representation of information" (= programming) ~Haskell

7 [ 7 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Lists (example "functions") Length: Member: Using underscore '_' (anonymous "ignore" variable) may improve readability member(X, cons(X, L)). member(X, cons(E, L)) :- member(X, L). len(0, nil). len(succ(N), cons(E, L)) :- len(N, L). P ROLOG also has built-in lists; let’s have a look at them… member(X, cons(X, _)). member(X, cons(_, L)) :- member(X, L). len(0, nil). len(succ(N), cons(_, L)) :- len(N, L). T

8 [ 8 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Lists (built-in) Constant lists: // the empty list // constant list Lists are (also) untyped; = finite sequence of (any) terms: [] [ [] ] [ vincent, jules, marcellus ] [ [], mia, 42, 'The Gimp', dead(zed), Z ] [ [], [], [ [] ], [ [ x, X, [] ] ] ] [] [ X, Y, Z ] Q: What is the length of the lists? ~Haskell

9 [ 9 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The Head-Tail Constructor P ROLOG (like many other languages) has: // "head-tail constructor" H head (element) of list, T tail of list (rest) for construction and deconstruction: (bigger) list  element and (smaller) list Example: “construction”: Example: “deconstruction”: [ H | T ] ~Haskell h:t ?- [ a | [b,c] ] = L. L = [a,b,c] ?- [a,b,c] = [ H | T ]. H = a T = [b,c]

10 [ 10 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Examples: “ [ H | T ] ” Empty list example: Mixed type example: Tricky’ish example: ?- [] = [ H | T ]. No ?- [ [], mia, 42, 'The Gimp', dead(zed), Z ] = [ X | Y ]. X = [] Y = [ mia, 42, 'The Gimp', dead(zed), _G225 ] Z = _G225 ?- [ [], [] ] = [ X | Y ]. X = [] Y = [ [] ]

11 [ 11 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Length and Member (revisited) Length/2 : Member/2 : Usage: member(X, [ X | _ ]). member(X, [ _ | L ]) :- member(X, L). len(0, []). len(succ(N), [ _ | L ]) :- len(N, L). ?- member(2, [1,2,3]). Yes ?- member(X, [1,2,3]). // gimme elements from list X=1 ; // next... X=2 ; X=3 ; No ~ Haskell

12 [ 12 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Append Append/3 : Search tree for: append([], L, L). append([X|L 1 ], L 2, [X|L 3 ]) :- append(L 1,L 2,L 3 ). append([a,b,c],[d,e,f],_G1) append([b,c],[d,e,f],_G2) _G1 = [a|_G2] append([c],[d,e,f],_G3) _G2 = [b|_G3] append([],[d,e,f],_G4) _G3 = [c|_G4] axiom _G4 = [d,e,f] ?- append([a,b,c], [d,e,f], R)R = [a,b,c,d,e,f] rule append([a,b,c],[d,e,f],[a,b,c,d,e,f]) append([b,c],[d,e,f],[b,c,d,e,f]) append([c],[d,e,f],[c,d,e,f]) append([],[d,e,f],[d,e,f]) T

13 [ 13 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Using Append Prefix/2 : Suffix/2 : SubList/2 :...alternatively...: prefix(P, L) :- suffix(S, L) :- append(_, S, L). subList(L sub, L) :- suffix(S, L), prefix(L sub, S). subList(L sub, L) :- prefix(P, L), suffix(L sub, P). append(P, _, L).

14 [ 14 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Reverse (and efficiency issues) Reverse/2 : Idea; exploit property: “ (x L) R = L R x ” Problem: [X|L] is asymmetrically left-to-right biased we cannot put the list in front and write: “ [ L | X ] ” Let's use append: rev([], []). rev([X|L], R) :- rev(L, L_rev), [L_rev | X] = R. Q: What about efficiency? 1) …of append? ; 2) …of reverse? rev([X|L], R) :- rev(L, L_rev), append(L_rev, [X], R).

15 [ 15 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Efficiency( append ): Efficiency( reverse ): Efficiency Q: Efficiency(reverse)...? |arg 1 |+1 rev([], []). rev([H|T], R) :- rev(T,T R ), app(T R,[H],R). app([], L, L). app([X|L 1 ], L 2, [X|L 3 ]) :- app(L 1,L 2,L 3 ). f  O(g)  def  n,k>0:  N>n => |f(N)|  k·|g(N)| " f is dominated by g for large values (larger than n )" Recall ("big-O definition"): O(|arg 1 |)

16 [ 16 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Search Tree: rev rev([1, 2, 3], _G1) rev rule rev([2, 3], _G2), app(_G2, [1], _G1) rev rule rev([3], _G3), app(_G3, [2], _G2), app(_G2, [1], _G1) rev rule rev([], _G4), app(_G4, [3], _G3), app(_G3, [2], _G2), app(_G2, [1], _G1) rev axiom app([], [3], _G3), app(_G3, [2], _G2), app(_G2, [1], _G1) (1 step of append) _G4 = [] app([3], [2], _G2), app(_G2, [1], _G1) app([3,2], [1], _G1) _G3 = [3] (2 steps of append) _G2 = [3,2] (3' append) _G1 = [3,2,1] steps (of append) O(|L| 2 ) |L|+1 steps (of reverse) O(|L|) + rev([], []). rev([H|T], R) :- rev(T,T R ), app(T R,[H],R).

17 [ 17 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Accumulator Let's use an accumulator: accRev([H|T], A, R) :- accRev(T, [H|A], R). accRev([], A, A). rev(L, R) :- accRev(L, [], R). rev([1,2,3], _G1) rev rule accRev([1,2,3], [], _G1) accRev rule accRev([2,3], [1], _G1) accRev rule accRev([3], [2,1], _G1) accRev rule accRev([], [3,2,1], _G1) |L| steps (of accRev) O(|L|) + 1 step (of rev) oldRev vs. newRev: O(n 2 ) O(n) oldRev newRev steps |L| ~ Haskell T

18 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS A RITHMETIC Keywords: Evaluation,...

19 [ 19 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Binary Infix Functors: {+,-,*,/} Consider: What is going on...?!? The symbols {+,-,*,/} are just: (Binary) infix functors: i.e., " 2+2 " is just a short-hand for " +(2,2) "; in fact: ?- 2+2 = 4 No ?- 2*2 = 4 No ?- 2-2 = 0 No ?- 2/2 = 1 No ?- 2+2 = +(2,2) Yes ~ Haskell

20 [ 20 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Binary Infix Functors (cont'd) The symbols {+,-,*,/} just (conveniently) represent structured information: is understood as precedence: {*,/} stronger-than {+,-} associativity: {+,-,*,/} left-associative...and is thus just a short-hand for:...which is, structurally, no different than: However, their interpretation may be very different; e.g., "represents" an expression that may be evaluated 1-2/3+4*5*61-2/3+4*5*6(1-(2/3))+((4*5)*6) "standard" precedence/ associativity rules +(-(1,/(2,3)),*(*(4,5),6) a(b(1,c(2,3)),d(d(4,5),6) ~ Haskell

21 [ 21 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The " is/2 " Predicate is/2  T ERM  T ERM: Evaluates its right argument (as arithmetic expression)...provided all variables are instantiated! Example (in predicate definition): ?- X is 2+2 X=4 ?- 2+2 is X *** ERROR: is/2: uninstantiated argument sq(X,Y) :- Y is X*X. ?- 4 is 2+2 Yes ?- 2+2 is 4 No ?- sq(5,Y). Y=25 ?- sq(X,25). *** ERROR: is/2: uninstantiated argument

22 [ 22 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Careful w/ Arithmetic Evaluation Recall " len/2 ": Arithmetic version(s): len 1 ([], 0). len 1 ([_|L], N_succ) :- len 1 (L, N), N is N_succ-1. len([], 0). len([_|L], succ(N)) :- len(L, N). len 2 ([], 0). len 2 ([_|L], N) :- len 2 (L, N_pred), N is N_pred+1. ?- len 1 ([1,2,3], R). *** ERROR: is/2: uninstantiated argument len 3 ([], 0). len 3 ([_|L], N) :- N is N_pred+1, len 3 (L, N_pred). ?- len 2 ([1,2,3], R). R=3 -? len 3 ([1,2,3], R). *** ERROR: is/2: uninstantiated argument...with unary encoding of numerals:   T

23 [ 23 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Accumulators (revisited) " len/2 ": Version with accumulator: accLen([], A, A). accLen([_|T], A, N) :- A new is A+1, accLen(T, A new, N) len(List, Length) :- accLen(List, 0, Length). len([], 0). len([_|T], N) :- len(T, X), N is X+1. len([1,2,3], _G1) len rule len([2,3], _G2), _G1 is _G2+1 len rule len([3], _G3), _G2 is _G3+1, _G1 is _G2+1 len rule len([], _G4), _G3 is _G4+1, _G2 is _G3+1, _G1 is _G2+1 accLen([1,2,3], 0, _G1) accLen rule; then "is" accLen([2,3], 1, _G1) accLen([3], 2, _G1) accLen([], 3, _G1) len axiom _G3 is 0+1, _G2 is _G3+1, _G1 is _G2+1 is accLen rule; then "is" O(n) wide! ~ Haskell accLen axiom Tail recursive! "calculation during recursion" However; NOT tail recursive: "calculation after recursion" Same #steps (both 7x)…

24 [ 24 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Comparison Operators More integer comparison operators (with arithmetic evaluation side-effects): " < " "less than" " <= " "less than or equal to" " > " "greater than" " >= " "greater than or equal to" " =:= " "equal to" " =\= " "not equal to" Evaluate both arguments Again, all variables have to be instantiated Otherwise no surprises...

25 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS Exercise 1, 2, and 3: 11:15 – 12:00

26 [ 26 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, Purpose: Learn how to...

27 [ 27 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, Purpose: Learn how to...

28 [ 28 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, Purpose: Learn how to...

29 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS R EVERSIBILITY

30 [ 30 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Ex: Symbolic Differentiation Symbolic differentiation: d dx (k) = 0 d dx (x) = 1 d dx (f+g) = d dx (f) + d dx (g) d dx (f-g) = d dx (f) - d dx (g) d dx (f*g) = f d dx (g) + g d dx (f) d dx (f/g) = d dx (f) + f d dx (g) g g * g d dx (x n ) = n * x n-1 d dx (e x ) = e x d dx (ln(x)) = 1x1x d dx (sin(x)) = cos(x) d dx (cos(x)) = -sin(x) d dx (g o f) = (g) o d dx f * () d dx (f)

31 [ 31 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, in P ROLOG In P ROLOG : dX(K, 0) :- number(K). // constant dX(x, 1). // variable dX(F+G, Df+Dg) :- dX(F,Df), dX(G,Dg). // add dX(F-G, Df-Dg) :- dX(F,Df), dX(G,Dg). // sub dX(F*G, Df*G+F*Dg) :- dX(F, Df), dX(G, Dg). // mul dX(F/G, (Df*G-F*Dg)/(G*G)) :- dX(F, Df), dX(G, Dg). // div [...] dX(cos(x), 0-sin(x)). // cos dX(F;G, (F;Dg)*Df) :- dX(F,Df), dX(G,Dg). // compose e x

32 [ 32 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Differentiation Interaction: Reverse: Does this mean we can do integration? No, just certain functions in "anti - normal form" (ANF); i.e., functions that are in the image of the differentiation ?- dX(x/exp(x), Df). Df = (1*exp(x)-x*exp(x)) / (exp(x)*exp(x)) ?- dX(F,(1*exp(x)-x*exp(x)) / (exp(x)*exp(x))). F = x/exp(x) ANF f' f

33 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS C UT AND N EGATION Keywords (chapter 10): Side-effect, Backtracking, Cut, Fail, Cut-Fail, Negation,...

34 [ 34 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The Cut Operator: ' ! ' Consider max/3 : Cut, "!", (locally) disables backtracking Cut version: Note: this cut changes only efficiency properties = "Green Cut" max(X,Y,Y) :- X =< Y. max(X,Y,X) :- X > Y. ?- max(3,4,M). M = 4 ?- ; // backtracking now causes futile re-evaluation of max Note: mutually exclusive conditions max(X,Y,Y) :- X =< Y, !. // commit (throw away max-backtracking) max(X,Y,X) :- X > Y.

35 [ 35 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 "Green Cuts" vs. "Red Cuts" "Green cut" version: Alternative "Red cut" version (= relying on cut) : Seems okay...:...but: max(X,Y,Y) :- X =< Y, !. max(X,Y,X) :- X > Y. max(X,Y,Y) :- X =< Y, !. max(X,Y,X). // only succeeds if above fails (...or?) ?- max(99,100,X). X = 100 // ok! ?- max(100,99,X). X = 100 // ok! ?- max(1,100,1). Yes // Oops! (evaluation never made it to the cut) Advice: "cut down on cut"

36 [ 36 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Fail and exception predicating Consider:...but maybe Vincent likes all burgers, except "Big Kahuna burgers". P ROLOG features a built-in " fail/0 "-predicate: Syntax: Semantics: "always fails (and forces backtracking)" enjoys(vincent, X) :- burger(X). fail enjoys(vincent, X) :- big_kahuna_burger(X), !, fail enjoys(vincent, X) :- burger(X). big_mac(b 0 ). ?- enjoys(vincent, b 0 ). Yes ?- enjoys(vincent, b 1 ). No big_kahuna_burger(b 1 ). the rule relies (operationally) on the cut = red cut

37 [ 37 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The Cut-Fail Combination The "cut-fail combination"......expresses negation...and is so common that it is built-in: not/1 ; equivalent to: It's better to use " not " it's a higher level abstraction (than cut-fail); However...: enjoys(vincent, X) :- big_kahuna_burger(X), !, fail enjoys(vincent, X) :- burger(X). not(Goal) :- Goal, !, fail. not(Goal). Inf. Sys. vs. P ROLOG Cut has operationally (well-)defined semantics Isn't always "well-defined": | _ P(x) which relation ?! p(x) :- not(p(x)).

38 [ 38 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 If-then-else: " ( A -> B ; C ) " P ROLOG has an if-then-else construction: Syntax: ( A -> B ; C ) Semantics: "if A; then B, else C" Alternative version of max/3 :...using if-then-else: max(X,Y,Z) :- ( X = Z = Y ; Z = X ).

39 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS L ANGUAGE I NTERPRETATION Keywords: Interpretation, Evaluation, Syntax, Semantics,...

40 [ 40 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Expressions (and syntax vs. semantics) Expressions: Syntax: Semantics (via evaluation relation: " | - eval  Exp  N "): Exp : N [const] : +(Exp,Exp) [add] : *(Exp,Exp) [mul] | _ eval N  N | _ eval E 1  N 1 | _ eval E 2  N 2 | _ eval +(E 1,E 2 )  N N = N 1  N 2 | _ eval E 1  N 1 | _ eval E 2  N 2 | _ eval *(E 1,E 2 )  N N = N 1  N 2 [const] [add] [mul] here in prefix notation just to emphasize difference between syntax and semantics syntactic "+" semantic  multiple levels of abstraction...!

41 [ 41 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Alice in Wonderland Different levels of abstraction: Things ‘A Sitting on a Gate’ Names of things ‘The Aged Aged Man.’ Things are called something ‘Ways and Means’ Names are called something ‘Haddocks’ Eyes.’ K> "[...] The name of the song is called ‘Haddocks’ Eyes.’ ” A> “Oh, that’s the name of the song, is it?” Alice said, trying to feel interested. K> “No, you don’t understand,” the Knight said, looking a little vexed. K> “That’s what the name is called. The name really is ‘The Aged Aged Man.’ ” A> “Then I ought to have said, ‘That’s what the song is called’?” Alice corrected herself. K> “No, you oughtn’t: that’s another thing. The song is called ‘Ways and Means’ : K> but that’s only what it’s called, you know!” A> “Well, what is the song, then?” said Alice, who was by this time completely bewildered. K> “I was coming to that,” the Knight said. “The song really is ‘A Sitting on a Gate’ : K> and the tune’s my own invention.” Alice and Knight talking

42 [ 42 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 [...back to]: (syntax vs. semantics) Expressions: Syntax: Semantics (via evaluation relation: " | - eval  Exp  N "): Exp : N [const] : +(Exp,Exp) [add] : *(Exp,Exp) [mul] | _ eval N  N | _ eval E 1  N 1 | _ eval E 2  N 2 | _ eval +(E 1,E 2 )  N N = N 1  N 2 | _ eval E 1  N 1 | _ eval E 2  N 2 | _ eval *(E 1,E 2 )  N N = N 1  N 2 [const] [add] [mul] here in prefix notation just to emphasize difference between syntax and semantics syntactic "+" semantic 

43 [ 43 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Expressions (in P ROLOG ) Syntax: Semantics: exp(con(N)) :- number(N). exp(add(E 1,E 2 )) :- exp(E 1 ), exp(E 2 ). exp(mul(E 1,E 2 )) :- exp(E 1 ), exp(E 2 ). eval(con(N), N). eval(add(E 1,E 2 ),N) :- eval(E 1,N 1 ), eval(E 2,N 2 ), N is N 1 + N 2. eval(mul(E 1,E 2 ),N) :- eval(E 1,N 1 ), eval(E 2,N 2 ), N is N 1 * N 2. ?- eval(mul(add(con(2),con(4)),con(7)),X). X = 42 ?- exp(mul(add(con(2),con(4)),con(7))). Yes eval(N, N) :- number(N). eval(E 1 +E 2,N) :- eval(E 1,N 1 ), eval(E 2,N 2 ), N is N 1 + N 2. eval(E 1 *E 2,N) :- eval(E 1,N 1 ), eval(E 2,N 2 ), N is N 1 * N 2. ?- eval((2+4)*7,X). X = 42 binary infix syntax

44 [ 44 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The "W HILE " Language The "W HILE " Language: Syntax: Semantics: Similar techniques (albeit somewhat more complicated)... Exp : N // const : X // var : Exp  Exp,   {+,-,*,/} // binop Com : skip // skip : X := Exp // assign : if ( Exp ) then Com else Com // if : while ( Exp ) do Com // while : Com ; Com // sequence

45 [ 45 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The Lambda Calculus Syntax: Semantics (call-by-value):  : V AR  Z Note: this is a variant of the   semantics you saw earlier You only have to understand here that The Lambda Calculus can be encoded in P ROLOG

46 [ 46 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 The Lambda Calculus (in P ROLOG ) Syntax: > Semantics: Similar techniques (as with the expression language) ?- eval(apply(lambda(x,variable(x)), lambda(y,variable(y)), Res). Res = lambda(y,variable(y))

47 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS N ON -T ERMINATION Keywords: Turing-Completeness, Reduction, Self-referentiality, Undecidability,...

48 [ 48 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Prolog A French programming language (from 1971): "Programmation en Logique" (="programming in logic") A declarative, relational style of programming based on first-order logic: Originally intended for natural-language processing, but has been used for many different purposes (esp. for programming artificial intelligence). The programmer writes a "database" of "facts" and "rules"; e.g.: The user then supplies a "goal" which the system attempts to prove (using resolution and backtracking); e.g., witch(girl). %- FACTS female(girl). floats(duck). sameweight(girl,duck). %- RULES witch(X) :- burns(X), female(X). burns(X) :- wooden(X). wooden(X) :- floats(X). floats(X) :- sameweight(X,Y), floats(Y).

49 [ 49 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Undecidability Consider "The Book-of-all-Books": This book contains the titles of all books that do not have a self-reference (i.e. don't contain their title inside) Finitely many books; i.e.: We can sit down & figure out whether to include or not... Q: What about "The Book-of-all-Books" ; Should it be included or not? "Self-referential paradox" (many guises): e.g. "This sentence is false" "The Bible" "War and P e ac e" "Programm i n g La nguages, An Interp.- B a s e d Approach"... The Book-of-all-Books

50 [ 50 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Undecidability (of Termination) Assume termination is decidable (in Java); i.e.  some program, halts: PROG  BOOL Q: Does P 0 loop or terminate...?:) Hence: "Termination is undecidable"...for W HILE, Java, C, Lambda Calculus, Prolog,... prog p0 = read_program("P 0.prg"); if (halts(p0) == "halts") loop(); else halt(); -- P 0.prg -- bool halts(prog p) {... }

51 [ 51 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Prolog A French programming language (from 1971): "Programmation en Logique" (="programming in logic") A declarative, relational style of programming based on first-order logic: Originally intended for natural-language processing, but has been used for many different purposes (esp. for programming artificial intelligence). The programmer writes a "database" of "facts" and "rules"; e.g.: The user then supplies a "goal" which the system attempts to prove (using resolution and backtracking); e.g., witch(girl). %- FACTS female(girl). floats(duck). sameweight(girl,duck). %- RULES witch(X) :- burns(X), female(X). burns(X) :- wooden(X). wooden(X) :- floats(X). floats(X) :- sameweight(X,Y), floats(Y).

52 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS Exercise 4, 5, and (6): 14:15 – 16:15

53 [ 53 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, Purpose: Learn how to...

54 [ 54 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21,

55 [ 55 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 (6).... Purpose: Learn how to...

56 C LAUS B RABRAND O CT 21, 2009 P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS The End Questions? Good luck at the exam (!)

57 [ 57 ] C LAUS B RABRAND ?- P ROGRAMMING P ARADIGMS O CT 21, 2009 Terminology Predicates vs. Structured data: Arities and Signatures: "Arity" #arguments of a function/relation: (unary, binary, ternary,..., N-ary,...) "Signature" type of a function/relation: (e.g.: "+ fun ": Z  Z  Z ; "= rel "  Z  Z ) vertical(line(point(X,Y),point(X,Z)). Predicate/relation (being defined) structured data odd(succ(0)). predicate (being defined) structured data


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