Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Session 3128.0 Creating Health Equity: Going Beyond the Health Gap, the Mental Health Gap, and the Climate Gap Advancing equity through health in all policies:

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Session 3128.0 Creating Health Equity: Going Beyond the Health Gap, the Mental Health Gap, and the Climate Gap Advancing equity through health in all policies:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Session Creating Health Equity: Going Beyond the Health Gap, the Mental Health Gap, and the Climate Gap Advancing equity through health in all policies: opportunities and obstacles in implementation Jme McLean, MCP, MPH, Associate Director, PolicyLink American Public Health Association Annual Conference Boston, MA | November 4, 2013

2 Definitions 2 -HiAP is a horizontal, complementary policy- related strategy with a high potential to contributing to population health. The core of Health in All Policies is to examine determinants of health, which can be influenced to improve health but are mainly controlled by policies of sectors other than health. – World Health Organization HiAP is a collaborative approach to improving the health of all people by incorporating health considerations into decision-making across sector and policy areas. – APHA, Public Health Institute, CA Department of Public Health Health in All Polici es ( HiAP )

3 Definitions 3 Equity means just and fair inclusion. The goals of equity must be to create conditions that allow all to reach their full potential. In short, equity creates a path from hope to change. - PolicyLink

4

5 Presentation Objective Identify three strategies for addressing equity through Health in All Policies (HiAP) implementation 5

6 6 PolicyLink is a national research and action institute advancing economic and social equity by Lifting Up What Works. ® PROMISE NEIGHBORHOODS INSTITUTE The Sustainable Communities Initiative (HUD-DOT-EPA) ALLIANCE FOR Boys and Men of Color Convergence Partnership Healthy People, Healthy Places Convergence Partnership Healthy People, Healthy Places

7 7 PolicyLink is a national research and action institute advancing economic and social equity by Lifting Up What Works. ®

8 Strategy 1 Create opportunity by improving transparency Strategy 2 Foster both vertical and horizontal collaboration Strategy 3 Seek equity in both the process and outcomes Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 8

9 City of Richmond, CA 9

10 10 Higher rates of heart disease, cancer and stroke among Richmond residents Higher than average asthma hospitalizations among Richmond children Richmond shows highest diabetes mortality rates Richmond shows second highest rates for hospitalization related to substance abuse and mental health

11 City of Richmond, CA

12 DevelopmentReviewAdoption and Launch of Implementation Development Projected Timeline for HWE Implementation Actual Timeline for HWE Implementation Review Launch of Implementation Adoption of HWE

13 City of Richmond, CA Development Continued Implementation and Expanded Efforts Implementation… Review Launch of Implementation Adoption of HWE Richmond Health Equity Partnership & HiAP HiAP Ordinance

14 City of Richmond, CA Obstacles related to “healthy policy” implementation: Availability of information regarding when and how communities can engage in local government activities and decisions Differences in departmental information and activities… – …connected with or informed by community health outcomes – …related to community engagement and information on community assets and resources Mixed perceptions: – Among departments regarding adversarial community engagement – Among communities regarding closed communication with agencies – Among agencies or departments regarding interagency collaboration Differing expectations regarding among engaged parties (agencies, departments, funders, communities) 14

15 City of Richmond, CA Opportunities related to “healthy policy” implementation: Common interests among diverse stakeholders to address city challenges, including community health and equity Strong political leadership Financial resources available to support interagency collaboration Internal champions (elected and administrative) Active and engaged advocates (both individual and organizational) Environment supportive of change Wealth of local resources (human, political, financial, intellectual) 15

16 16 Citywide Systems and Policies Neighborhood Improvement Strategies Community Engagement Data, Information, and Tracking Framework for Healthy and Equitable Policy Implementation

17 Citywide Systems and Policies Neighborhood Improvement Strategies Community Engagement Data, Information, and Tracking Strategy 1 Create opportunity by improving transparency Strategy 2 Foster both vertical and horizontal collaboration Strategy 3 Seek equity in both the process and outcomes Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 17

18 California HiAP AB 32 – climate change SB 732 – Strategic Growth Council Executive Order S – HiAP – HiAP Task Force – California Department of Public Health leads – Kitchen Cabinet or “Stakeholder Advisory Group” 18

19 California HiAP Obstacles related to “healthy policy” implementation: Differences in departmental information and activities… – …connected with or informed by community health outcomes – …related to community engagement and information on community assets and resources Mixed perceptions: – Among departments regarding adversarial community engagement – Among communities regarding closed communication with agencies – Among agencies or departments regarding interagency collaboration Differing expectations among engaged parties (agencies, departments, funders, communities) 19

20 California HiAP Opportunities related to “healthy policy” implementation: Common interests among diverse stakeholders to create healthy communities Strong political leadership Financial resources to support interagency collaboration Active and engaged advocates (especially organizational) Environment supportive of change Wealth of local resources (human, political, financial, intellectual) 20

21 21 Citywide Systems and Policies Neighborhood Improvement Strategies Community Engagement Data, Information, and Tracking Framework for Healthy and Equitable Policy Implementation

22 Citywide Systems and Policies Neighborhood Improvement Strategies Community Engagement Data, Information, and Tracking Strategy 1 Create opportunity by improving transparency Strategy 2 Foster both vertical and horizontal collaboration Strategy 3 Seek equity in both the process and outcomes Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 22

23 23

24 Strategy 1 Create opportunity by improving transparency Funders Invest in strategies for improved communication and identification of shared goals across HiAP partners. Health Agencies Share health info with HiAP partners in relevant formats (utility, language, geographic scale, etc.). Other Agencies Communicate plans and processes for decision-making, and how/when HiAP partners can participate. Advocates Build capacity of HiAP partners to understand and leverage community assets. Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 24

25 Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 25 Strategy 2 Foster both vertical and horizontal collaboration Funders Require inclusion of low-income people and communities of color in HiAP efforts as a condition of funding. Health Agencies Share and model strategies for positive community engagement with HiAP agency partners. Other Agencies Consider cost-benefit of proactive engagement before HiAP projects vs. managing reactions after. Advocates Advance HiAP issues by building internal relationships as well as applying external pressure.

26 Three Strategies for Equitable HiAP 26 Strategy 3 Seek equity in both the process and outcomes Funders Match HiAP objectives with short-term and long-term time frames for building power among impacted communities. Health Agencies Challenge conventional wisdom with data on racial and socioeconomic inequities and questions about power. Other Agencies Look for shared goals with communities and identify opportunities to increase their capacity. Advocates Champion both inclusive HiAP processes as well as policies that promote inclusion.

27 “In order to address health inequities, and inequitable conditions of daily living, it is necessary to address inequities—such as those between men and women—in the way society is organized. This requires a strong public sector that is committed, capable, and adequately financed. To achieve that requires more than strengthened government—it requires strengthened governance: legitimacy, space and support for civil society, for an accountable private sector, and for people across society to agree on public interests and reinvest in the value of collective action. In a globalised world, the need for governance dedicated to equity applies equally from the community level to global institutions.” - World Health Organization (WHO). Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, WHO, Geneva,

28 Thank You! 28 Jme McLean, MCP, MPH, Associate Director, PolicyLink American Public Health Association Annual Conference Boston, MA | November 4, 2013


Download ppt "Session 3128.0 Creating Health Equity: Going Beyond the Health Gap, the Mental Health Gap, and the Climate Gap Advancing equity through health in all policies:"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google