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Drinking Water and Wastewater Facilities An Innovative Partnership: The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection The Massachusetts Department.

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Presentation on theme: "Drinking Water and Wastewater Facilities An Innovative Partnership: The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection The Massachusetts Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 Drinking Water and Wastewater Facilities An Innovative Partnership: The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection The Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Michael DiBara, MassDEP 30th Annual International Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy October 21, 2014

2 Clean Energy Results Program  Launched in November, 2011  MassDEP, DOER and CEC partnership  To advance environmental protection by promoting the development of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in Massachusetts Barnstable Water Pollution Control Facility 819 kW

3 Topics today: CERP in BRP  MA Energy Pilot  Energy Leaders Roundtable Group  In-Conduit Hydropower Project  MA Return-on-Investment Model Moving energy-saving projects forward

4 Water / Wastewater Treatment in MA  370 public facilities  $150M / year Impacts  1 billion kWhs  1 million tons (CO 2 )

5 MA Energy Management Pilot (2007 – 2010) Public  (7) Water & (7) Wastewater Facilities  MA Dept. of Environmental Protection  MA Executive Office of Energy / Environmental Affairs  MA Dept of Energy Resources  EPA New England  MA Renewable Energy Trust  UMass Amherst – Northeast CHP Center Private  Every Major Investor-Owned Electric & Gas Utility Non Profit  Consortium for Energy Efficiency

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7 14 Pilot Facilities: Recommendations Efficiency: Save $2M / Year Green Power: Save $1.7M / Year Massachusetts’ Energy Pilot (2007 – 2010)

8 ARRA – Green Infrastructure Recovery & Reinvestment: Clean Energy & the Environment Fully Implement Pilot & Other “Green” projects (7) Wastewater Plants: $ 34.8 M (7) Water Plants: $ 8.2M $ 43.0M (7) Others $ 23.1M Total $ 66.1M Jump-start “Green” projects: 20% of SRF ARRA

9 City of Pittsfield Wastewater Treatment Plant 1,584 kW solar PV CHP Upgrade Aeration Upgrade - Diffused Air w / Turbo Blowers Overall 90% reduction in electrical costs, saving $660,000 / yr

10 Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Plant Install VFDs / Premium Efficiency Motors Operational, Aeration, Water System, Lighting Improvements Save ~$637,000 / yr in Electric Costs Sludge digester &HVAC improvements Save ~$350,000 / yr in Natural Gas Costs Est. Annual CO 2 Emission Reductions: 2,035 tons

11 Town of Chelmsford Crooked Spring Water Treatment Plant 485 kW solar PV Feasibility Study: UMass – Lowell Producing 500,000 kWh / year (41%) Saving $ 73,000 / yr (Electricity/ REC) Real Time power monitoring (plant / public)

12 Results: National Model  Facilities saving $5 million annually  10 Megawatts of Clean Energy installed  23,000 tons of GHG emission reductions / year

13 Mass Energy Leaders Roundtable (2010 – 2014)  Coalition of state, federal, community & energy efficiency providers  Each meeting has a technical presentation, a presentation from a water utility, a discussion on energy management planning, and a site visit.

14 Integrated Approach – To Encourage  Energy benchmarking  Energy audits  Renewable energy assessments  EPA Energy Management Plan – Do – Check - Act Model  Financial Assistance

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16 Slide courtesy of Alden Research Laboratory (C. Fay)

17 In-Conduit Hydropower: Alden Lab Three parts of the project 1. Technology research 2. Potential for installations in Massachusetts 3. Screening tool to allow facilities to estimate potential energy generation & economic / environmental benefits ‘Reports & Screening Tool’ on MassDEP’s website

18 Existing Technologies Many turbine technologies reviewed 28 included in report Courtesy: Toshiba Courtesy: ABS Alaska Courtesy: Canyon Hydro Slide courtesy of Alden Research Laboratory (C. Fay)

19 Typical Layout (1) Slide courtesy of Alden Research Laboratory (C. Fay)

20 Project to replace old flow control station 2 to 14 mgd flows w/ ~60 psi pressure reduction $3 million construction 62 kW Cornell hydro turbine Revenue generated: ~$14,000 sale of power ~10,000 Class I REC’s Pittsfield Water - Coltsville Flow Control Station Project Slide courtesy of AECOM (D. Gove)

21 Objective: To develop a Financial Assistance / Partnership Model using energy-saving projects that will generate positive cash flow for cities and towns that can be reinvested back into public drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Goal: Return on Investment The Power of Positive Cash Flow

22 Bundling Energy-Saving Projects Cash Flow ($) = Revenues - Costs

23 Funding Sources

24 Reducing Operating Costs & Reinvesting in your Facility  Quantify energy & cost savings  Energy-savings can boost your bottom line & reduce your carbon footprint  Pay for wasted energy or reinvest it in your facility (people / equipment / assets)

25 2014 DW & WW Clean Energy ‘Gap’ Grants through MA DOER o Partnership between MA DOER, Mass DEP & MA CEC o $1,700,000 in grant funding o Max grant $200,000 Timelines o Feb 26, 2014 – Grant Announcement o April 23, 2014 – Close of Applications June 3, 2014 – Grant Awards agencies-and-divisions/doer/doer-procurements.html

26 2014 DW & WW Clean Energy ‘Gap’ Grants through MA DOER ROI: $1.7 M gap grant  $11M of Projects

27 Projected Results: ‘Gap’ Funding  31 Energy-saving projects moving forward Energy efficiency & on-site clean energy generation 1,500 kW (CHP), 4 solar PV (497 kW), water-source heat pump  Approx. $1.2M in annual cost savings for facilities  Approx. 15,300,000 kWh in annual electricity savings or on-site power generation  Grant Awards: facilities.html

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29 In summary, Facilities can continue to pay their existing / rising energy bills or they can act on their identified energy-saving opportunities

30 Thank you! Contacts  Michael DiBara (508)  Ann Lowery (617) AND + DOER’s Green Communities Coordinators in each MassDEP regional office


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