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Education and Early Childhood Development Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern.

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Presentation on theme: "Education and Early Childhood Development Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern."— Presentation transcript:

1 Education and Early Childhood Development Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern University Jim Stergios Executive Director, Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research Paul Toner President, Massachusetts Teachers Association Tassy Warren Project Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

2 In loving memory of John Sarvey 6/1/ /24/2012

3 Education and Early Childhood Development Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern University Jim Stergios Executive Director, Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research Paul Toner President, Massachusetts Teachers Association Tassy Warren Project Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

4 Early Childhood Development and Policy Implications Tassy Warren Center on the Developing Child Open Classroom, Northeastern University| November 28, 2012 YOUR INSTITUTION’S LOGO

5 Educational Achievement Economic Productivity Responsible Citizenship Lifelong Health Strong Communities Healthy Economy Successful Parenting of Next Generation The Foundation of a Successful Society is Built in Early Childhood

6 Three Core Concepts of Development Brain Architecture Is Established Early in Life and Supports Lifelong Learning, Behavior, and Health Stable, Caring Relationships and “Serve and Return” Interaction Shape Brain Architecture Toxic Stress in the Early Years of Life Can Derail Healthy Development

7 Experiences Build Brain Architecture

8 Brains are built over time, starting in the earliest years of life. Simple skills come first; more complex skills build on top of them. Brain Architecture Supports Lifelong Learning, Behavior, and Health Cognitive, emotional, and social capabilities are inextricably intertwined throughout the life course. A strong foundation in the early years improves the odds for positive outcomes and a weak foundation increases the odds of later difficulties.

9 Young children naturally reach out for interaction through babbling, facial expressions, and gestures, and adults respond in kind. Serve & Return Builds Brains and Skills These “serve and return" interactions are essential for the development of healthy brain circuits. Therefore, systems that support the quality of relationships in early care settings, communities, and homes also support the development of sturdy brain architecture.

10 The Ability to Change Brains Decreases Over Time Source: Levitt (2009) Birth Physiological “Effort” Required to Enhance Neural Connections Normal Brain Plasticity Influenced by Experience Age (Years)

11 Barriers to Educational Achievement Emerge at a Very Young Age 16 mos.24 mos.36 mos. Cumulative Vocabulary (Words) College Educated Parents Working Class Parents Welfare Parents Child’s Age (Months) Source: Hart & Risley (1995)

12 Emotions Executive function and self- regulation skills comprise an array of capacities that include the ability to focus and sustain attention, set goals and make plans, follow rules, solve problems, monitor actions, and control impulses. ErrorProcessing Reaction and Responses Use of Rules Risk/Reward Decisions Behavioral Control Working Memory An “Air Traffic Control System” in the Brain  A key biological foundation of school readiness as well as outcomes in health and employability

13 What are Executive Function Skills? Inhibitory Control — filter thoughts and impulses to resist temptations and distractions Mental flexibility — adjust to changed demands, priorities, or perspectives Working Memory — hold and manipulate information in our heads over short periods of time

14 When Do Executive Function Skills Develop? Weintraub, et al., (2011) Birth Age (Years) Skill proficiency

15 Policy Implications -Invest early - during the time of greatest cognitive development – in high quality programs -Return on investment -Lower education, health care, incarceration costs down the road -Increased earning, taxes -Invest more in those at higher risk % chance of developmental delays when exposed to significant adversity -3:1 odds of adult heart disease after 7-8 adverse childhood experiences

16 Policy Implications -It’s not just about the kids -Adult capacity -Community capacity -Creative use of existing funding streams

17 Policy Implications FIVE NUMBERS TO REMEMBER ABOUT ECD

18 Tassy Warren Director Frontiers of Innovation initiative YOUR INSTITUTION’S LOGO

19 Education and Early Childhood Development Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern University Jim Stergios Executive Director, Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research Paul Toner President, Massachusetts Teachers Association Tassy Warren Project Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

20 Climate: Challenge s and Solutions Open Classroom Series Spring 2013 Wednesday evenings, 6:00 to 8:00pm January 9 th – April 17 th West Village F, Room 20

21 Immigration Policy Advice to the President Session 12: November 28 th School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs | Northeastern University Eva Millona Executive Director, Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition Jeff Jacoby Boston Globe columnist


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