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1 |1 | Department (slide master) Ins and Outs of Humidity Basic to Advanced Investigations What’s with the wet bulb in here?

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Presentation on theme: "1 |1 | Department (slide master) Ins and Outs of Humidity Basic to Advanced Investigations What’s with the wet bulb in here?"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 |1 | Department (slide master) Ins and Outs of Humidity Basic to Advanced Investigations What’s with the wet bulb in here?

2 2 |2 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Index Humidity defined Overview Units for measuring air Humidity’s impact Low Humidity High Humidity The Problem With Dry Bulb The Psychometric chart Overview Axis's and Values Plotting Basics Plotting Advanced Some More Fun

3 3 |3 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Humidity Defined Overview Humidity refers to moisture in air in vapor form This vapor contains energy equivalent to “steam” at the same temperature and pressure Can be a large portion of the heat energy contained in air In high concentrations it can impair the bodies capability to cool itself and promote the growth of illness causing pathogens* * Thought experiment: Why is salt sterile??

4 4 |4 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Humidity Defined Units for measuring When we talk about temperature we need to define which temperature we are talking about To accurately specify a condition of air we really need to use both Dry Bulb and Wet Bulb Temperatures Definition of Dry Bulb and Wet Bulb temperatures Dry bulb (db) refers to the measurement of the physical energy of the air molecules Wet bulb (wb) refers to the temperature as affected by the rate of evaporation of water

5 5 |5 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Dry Bulb Temperature Dry bulb is the temperature that most people refer to when they refer to a temperature value of air, water etc. This temperature refers to the sensible only component of air and does not include the effects of water vapor

6 6 |6 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Wet Bulb Temperature Moist environment, low evaporation rate Dry environment, high evaporation rate Wet Sock Wet bulb temperature takes into account the moisture content of the air It does this by using the cooling effect of the evaporation of water into the air A wet sock is placed over the measuring section of a dry bulb thermometer

7 7 |7 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Wet Bulb Temperature Moist environment, low evaporation rate Dry environment, high evaporation rate Wet Sock Since evaporation requires heat, the process of evaporation cools the remaining water in the ‘sock’ below it’s dry bulb temperature The drier the air, the quicker the rate of evaporation and the lower the resulting temperature will be This difference between db and wb is called the ‘wb depression’

8 8 |8 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Health Why is this the case??

9 9 |9 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Health Your body uses the cooling effect of evaporation to remove heat from the bodies core To do this, sweat evaporating cools the skin and underlying tissues

10 10 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Health Capillaries carry warm blood from the bodies core outwards near the surface Here the blood flows through the cooled area, gives up heat and returns to the core

11 11 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Health Remember how high humidity lowers the rate of evaporation? By reducing evaporation, there is much less heat being removed from the outer layers of the body This means the blood that comes from the core cannot give up it’s heat so core body temperature rises

12 12 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Health In the winter time, the outside air is cold and contains very little moisture, even when it is saturated Air that enters a dwelling and warms up has the capability to hold far more moisture and will dry out any open source of moisture This includes the sinus areas which rely on mucus to prevent the entering of viruses etc. Cat + Dry Air + Styrofoam packing =

13 13 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Air Pressure Remember how people always say the air feels heavy when what they really means is it’s humid?? But why does it rain when there is a drop is atmospheric pressure? Can you spot the hurricane?

14 14 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Impact of Humidity on Air Pressure Due to the effect of water molecules having a high average space between them compared to air molecules, moist air is less dense than dry air This means that moist low pressure air is pushed upwards by cooler high pressure air moving in and can result severe thunderstorms

15 15 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb It is a typical scenario. The room temperature rises and the t-stat brings on the AC. However there is more to conditioning of the air than just cooling it and the typical AC system also removes moisture from the air. However, what if the DB temperature is not high enough to force the T-stat to call for cooling? Or the latent load is just really high and there is a risk of moisture related problems occurring in the basement? Do you cool the whole house down to 64F just to remove enough moisture?

16 16 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb The point that is classified as a “space-neutral” condition is 75°F DB and 50%RH. When the ambient condition is different from this condition, which is almost always, then the air inside will tend to deviate away from this point as well. Organizations like ASHRAE understand this dilemma all too well and as a result have recommended that geographic regions that have high latent to sensible ratios should have a separate dehumidification capability that does not necessarily rely on the air-conditioning operating. It is important to remember that indoor occupancy comfort is also paramount and making a space colder just to reduce humidity levels will only make matters worse.

17 17 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb Finding a Solution So if supplemental dehumidification is the answer then, let’s look at how a dehumidifier actually operates. Most dehumidifiers have the same components that an AC unit has: evaporator, condenser, metering device and compressor. The main difference is in the air flows. While most AC units have separate air flows for the cooling and heat rejection sides, dehumidifiers have only one. Condenser EvaporatorFan

18 18 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb Finding a Solution Having the condenser coil in series with the airstream leaving the evaporator allows the unit to operate as long as is required to remove humidity without overcooling the space. When you consider that AC was first implemented for humidity control rather than sensible cooling, you can see the irony in this. Condenser EvaporatorFan

19 19 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb Finding a Solution Since fresh air requirements need t be met regardless of the outdoor air condition, manufacturers have developed flexible approaches to minimize the energy required to treat the air If the air is cool and dry, great just bring it on in. However, if it is cool but moist, a smart design will use just enough energy to treat the humidity issue and no more. Reheat Coil Dehumidification Coil (Evaporator 2) AC Coil (Evaporator 1) Fresh Air Exhaust Air Return Air

20 20 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Problem with Dry Bulb Finding a Solution By utilizing an evaporator coil designed for latent heat removal and a low cfm per ton airflow, aggressive humidity removal can be achieved Combined with using the discharge gas to reheat the air, a mixture of dry treated air can be mixed in the required ratio to maintain a suitable indoor space condition Reheat Coil Dehumidification Coil (Evaporator 2) AC Coil (Evaporator 1) Fresh Air Exhaust Air Return Air

21 21 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart Above is a typical Psychometric chart used in the HVAC&R field (And was found on the web site noted above! ) It looks intimidating, but when investigated step by step, it is not so bad!

22 22 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart The psychometric chart for the air side processes is like the Mollier diagram for the refrigeration cycle processes It allows you to quantitatively plot what is actually happening when treating the air

23 23 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart Lets look at the more pertinent values you can ascertain form the chart Here are the temperature scales for Wb and DB and 75F circled on both scales with the associated process lines 75F DB Line 75F WB Line

24 24 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart To plot a point using DB and WB follow the process lines from each value until they intercept Her we show a plot for 80 DB and 70 WB 80F DB Point of 80DB and 70 WB

25 25 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart On the right side is the Humidity ratio scale. This measures the weight of water in a pound of air In this case it is using grains of water as the unit There is 7000 grains to a lb.

26 26 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart From the previous plot, we can see that the plotted point contains ~ 92 grains of moisture 75F DB Point of 80DB and 70 WB

27 27 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart A Sensible Process A sensible process is one where the db temperature increases but the grains of moisture stay the same An electric heater is a good example of a sensible process. 75F DB Constant Grains of Moisture

28 28 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart A Sensible Process Example: Air at 50F DB and 45F Wb is heated sensibly to 90F by an electric heater Plot the process on a psychometric chart 90F DB

29 29 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart A Sensible Process Find the point 50F DB and 45F WB Draw a line from this point following the grains of moisture line until it intercepts the vertical 90F Db line and stop. This is your air leaving point. 90F DB

30 30 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart A Latent Process A latent process is a process where only the amount of moisture changes in the air but the dry bulb remains constant It follows the dry bulb line vertically up or down

31 31 | Danfoss Wholesale Training The Psychometric Chart A Latent Process Where as a purely sensible process is fairly common, a strictly latent process is very rare Almost all processes where there is a change in moisture also under go a change in sensible temperature as well

32 32 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Questions????

33 Some More Things We Can Measure Enthalpy Lets switch to a more detailed chart. On this chart the enthalpy scale is on the outside and bottom of the chart It shows how much heat energy in Btu/lb is present in the air.

34 The total enthalpy in the air is a measure of the total amount of sensible and latent heat contained in a lb of air When the dry bulb or wet bulb temperature changes, it results in a change in the enthalpy of the air as well Example 1 : Plot the point of air at 75 F Db and 55F WB. Find the enthalpy at his point Example 2: If the moisture level of the air is increased until the WB temperature becomes 65F, what will the new enthalpy be? Things We Can Measure Enthalpy

35 Things We Can Measure Enthalpy Example 1 Plotted point at 75F DB and 55F WB.

36 Things We Can Measure Enthalpy Example 1 Using a ruler, extend the line until it intersects the enthalpy line and read the value* 23 btu/lb

37 Things We Can Measure Enthalpy Example 2 Extend the db line until it intercepts the 65F Wb line. Repeat the steps following from the previous example 23 btu/lb 30 btu/lb The enthalpy of the point in Ex. 2 is 30 btu/lb

38 The lines that curve up to the right are the relative humidity (RH) lines Before we move forward, let’s define what RH actually means Some More Things We Can Measure Relative Humidity

39 Relative humidity is not an actual amount in terms of mass or energy It is a ratio of the amount of moisture that is in the air compared to how much the air can actually hold before it is saturated Air is said to be saturated if it is holding the maximum amount of moisture it can at it’s current temperature At 100% RH, the DB and WB temperatures will be the same!! Example : Air at 70F contains 55 grains of moisture per lb of air. If it is at 50% RH, how much moisture will the air hold at 100% RH (Saturated)? Simple logic tells us that at 50% RH, the air is only holding half of what it would hold at 100% RH. So doubling 55 grains = 110 grains. But to verify, lets look at the chart. Things We Can Measure Relative Humidity (RH)

40 100% RH Line Things We Can Measure Relative Humidity (RH) Follow the line from 70F Db at the bottom upward to where it crosses both the 50% RH and the 100%RH (Saturated line.)

41 100% RH Line Things We Can Measure Relative Humidity (RH) If we follow the grains of moisture lines to the Humidity Ratio scale we can verify our values 55 grains 110 grains

42 We often hear the term dew point and even see a value for it when they are showing the weather statistics Dew point refers to the air temperature when air will be at saturation (100% RH) It is based on the fact that DB temperature affects the amount of moisture that the air can hold. Every day example : We see this effect when moist air rises and forms clouds. As the air rises it cools. When it cools down to the dew point temperature, the water condenses and forms clouds Things We Can Measure Dew Point

43 43 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Things We Can Measure Dew Point Chart Example: Air that is 80F DB and 50% RH cools down on the side of a cold glass. If the glass is 40F, will the air be chilled down to it’s dew point and below? Assume the air can reach the same temperature as the glass Steps: On the psychometric chart, plot the point 80F DB and 50% RH Travel horizontally to the left until you hit the saturation line (100% RH). This is the dew point temperature. If this value is higher than 40F, than the air can become less than the dew point temperature and moisture will condense.

44 44 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Dew Point = 58F Things We Can Measure Dew Point

45 45 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Things We Can Measure Specific Volume Specific volume refers to the volume of air that is required to weigh 1 lb. It is the inverse of density which is lbs./ ft³ Both the sensible temperature and the amount of moisture affect the specific volume of the air and the psychometric chart is a great tool for demonstrating this. On the next slide, the specific volume lines are highlighted

46 46 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Specific Volume = 13.5 ft³/lb. Things We Can Measure Specific Volume Specific Volume Line

47 47 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Things We Can Measure Specific Volume The specific volume increases with an increase in DB Temp. This means the air is less dense at it heats up

48 48 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Things We Can Measure Specific Volume The same occurs with an increase in moisture! Notice how the specific volume lines arc up and to the left?

49 49 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Getting Started We have already seen how to use 2 points such as DB/WB to find a point on the chart However, to be fully useful, we will need to plot actual processes as these are what are actually occurring when we treat the air Remember this shape, it will come in handy shortly. The ‘triangle’

50 50 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Getting Started We have already seen purely sensible and latent process but in reality, especially for AC, the process is a combination of the 2 Sensible only cooling Latent only drying Actual AC Process

51 51 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Getting Started You can do the same for heating and humidification This is where we heat the air sensibly and add moisture through a humidifier in the furnace. Sensible only heating Latent only humidification Actual Process

52 52 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Now for some fun. Let’s plot a typical air conditioning process where the air is cooled down through the evaporator to below it’s dew point Some of the moisture will condense out and drain away Thus it will end up being sensibly cooler and contain less moisture than when it entered. Now let’s apply this to the psychometric chart!

53 53 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Doing a plot While measuring the air return and supply from the indoor unit, we get the values below Entering 75 DB/ 67 WB Leaving 60 DB/ 58WB Calculate: Change in sensible heat (btu/lb) Change in latent heat (btu/lb) Grains of moisture removed (gr/lb) Plot these 2 points on the chart

54 54 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Doing a plot Entering 75 DB/ 67 WB Leaving 60 DB/ 58WB Latent Sensible 31.6 btu/lb 29 btu/lb 25.1 btu/lb Total Heat Removed Grains removed = 17 grains

55 55 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Doing another plot Heating and Humidification Something to ponder: When an evaporative humidifier is placed in the outlet airstream of a furnace does the evaporation of the water change the total heat energy of the air?? In reality the change is very little, even if the water is cooler than the air. However the mix of sensible vs. latent does change. True or false? The addition of moisture (Latent heat) comes at the expense of sensible heat. True

56 56 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Doing another plot Heating and Humidification Example to plot: Air enters a furnace at 70F DB and 30% RH. It leaves the heat exchanger at 110F. It then enters an evaporative humidifier which adds 10 grains of water per lb of air. Plot and calculate the total heat added to the air. The leaving air DB and WB.

57 57 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Enthalpy= 22 btu/lb. Constant Enthalpy Process Plotting Doing another plot Enthalpy= 32 btu/lb. 33 grains 43 grains

58 58 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting ADP Apparatus Dew Point is the temperature of the coil required to achieve a leaving air condition that falls along the desired process line It is found by extending the process line until it intercepts the saturated (100% RH) line. The steeper the slope (Greater latent process) the lower the ADP required

59 59 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Apparatus Dew Point (ADP) ADP = 55F Entering 75 DB/ 67 WB Leaving 60 DB/ 90%RH ADP = 49F Entering 75 DB/ 67 WB Leaving 56 DB/ 90%RH

60 60 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Coil Bypass Because 100% of the air does not come into contact with the coil, the resulting leaving air is a mixture of air that has and has not been treated Typical coil bypass factors are.1 to.35 which means that 10 to 35% of the air does not come into contact with the coil The mixed air condition will fall along between the entering air point and the ADP point.

61 61 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Factors Affecting Coil Bypass Coils with a tighter fin spacing will have a lower bypass factor However, pressure drop across the coil also increases Another way to achieve a lower bypass is to reduce the velocity of the air At a lower velocity the air remains in contact with the coil for longer, greater mixing occurs and more moisture is removed

62 62 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Apparatus Dew Point (ADP) ADP = 49F The black dot represents the leaving condition with a lower bypass. The blue dot represents the leaving condition with a relatively high bypass.

63 63 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Variable Speed Processes A variable or multi speed fan is a great way to achieve a lower velocity for a dehumidification focused process while having the ability to run at a higher velocity for a more sensible process Care must be taken to protect the compressor against flood back Thought experiment: What can happen when the fan switches to a humidification process on a TXV metered evaporator and air flow suddenly drops

64 64 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Variable Speed Processes One of the issues with a fixed speed compressor is that when the load on the evaporator is high, such as during high latent loads, the TXV will open up and inject more refrigerant into the evaporator The result is a higher saturated evaporator temperature This is the result of the compressor needing higher density vapor to increase it’s pumping capacity

65 65 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Equilibrium The main concept here is that the flow through the TXV must be balanced by the pumping capacity of the compressor This state can be referred to as ‘equilibrium’ In equilibrium, the pressures and temperatures do not change We see this when the load and ambient conditions are constant

66 66 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Load Changes and System Pressures If one of the parameters changes, say the air flowing over the evaporator becomes warmer, the equilibrium will be broken and the system conditions will begin to change In this case, if a TXV is used, the valve will begin to open and inject more refrigerant into the evaporator

67 67 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Load Changes and System Pressures This extra refrigerant flowing into the evaporator has to go somewhere and in this case it must be pumped thru the compressor However, in order for the compressor to move more mass of refrigerant, the density of the refrigerant must increase As a result, the pressure and temperatures in the evaporator will increase

68 68 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Load Changes and System Pressures For a certain volume, the higher the density of the vapor, the more mass it will contain 20 psig 1 ft3 = 0.79 lbs. 40 psig 1 ft3 = 1.21 lbs. 1 ft3 This cylinder contains 50% more refrigerant

69 69 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Variable Speed Process ADP = 49F Here is the desired process This is representative of reality under high load

70 70 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Variable Speed Processes This issue can be over come by utilizing a variable speed compressor that can increase it’s pumping capacity to maintain a lower saturated temperature and thus maintaining effective dehumidification. In reality, both the air and refrigerant can be varied to match closely the desired conditions This allows for greater flexibility and optimal space treatment

71 71 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Some formulas The psychometric chart can provide us valuable information regarding the energy change per pound of air or how much moisture in grains of water was added or removed However, to be truly useful we need to convert these values into a format that is more suitable for using in an everyday application This is because systems are generally rated in Btu’s/hr, Tons of cooling or pounds of water per hour etc.

72 72 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Some formulas The sensible heat formula: Qs = 1.08 x ΔT x CFM Qs = Sensible heat in btu/hr 1.08 = A constant value ΔT = Temperature difference CFM =Air flow in cubic feet per minute In psychometrics, we use certain formulas in conjunction with the chart. We use the values we obtain form the chart and plug them into the appropriate formula

73 73 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Some formulas The Latent heat formula: Ql = 0.68 x ΔGr x CFM Ql = Latent heat in btu/hr 0.68 = A constant value ΔGr = Change in grains of moisture CFM =Air flow in cubic feet per minute The Total heat formula: Qt = 4.5 x Δh x CFM Qt = Total heat in btu/hr 4.5 = A constant value Δh = Change in enthalpy (btu/lb of air.) CFM =Air flow in cubic feet per minute

74 74 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Some formulas From the chart plot, obtain the latent energy enthalpy difference between the air entering the coil and air leaving. Let’s do an example 400 cfm of air enters a dehumidifier coil at 72F DB and 67F WB It leaves at 57DB and 56 WB. What is the latent heat removed in btu/lb?

75 75 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Enthalpy = 27.5 btu/lb. Things We Can Measure Specific Volume 94 grains Enthalpy = 31.9 btu/lb. 66 grains

76 76 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting Some formulas The latent heat formula: Ql =.68 x Δgr x CFM Ql =.68 x 28 x 400 Ql = 7616 btu/hrs Results: Change in grains = 94 – 66 = 28 gr/lb

77 77 | Danfoss Wholesale Training Process Plotting One more for fun Check this out: Lbs./hr H20 = cfm x ΔGr x 60 ft³/lb. x 7000 =400 x 28 x x 7000 = 7.3 lbs./hr How would you calculate lbs. per hours of water removed? A formula would need to convert cfm to lbs. per hours and grains to lbs. The result is useful for sizing a dehumidifier Lets use the results from the previous example


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