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Get our your Chains Figurative Language Notes if you still have them. If not, you will write all of these notes. Everyone will need to add some items.

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Presentation on theme: "Get our your Chains Figurative Language Notes if you still have them. If not, you will write all of these notes. Everyone will need to add some items."— Presentation transcript:

1 Get our your Chains Figurative Language Notes if you still have them. If not, you will write all of these notes. Everyone will need to add some items.

2 Term: Onomatopoeia Definition: When a word’s pronunciation imitates its sound. Examples: Buzz Fizz WoofHissClinkBoomBeep “Boom Boom Pow” by the Black Eyed Peas I'm so 3008 You so 2000 and late I got that boom, boom, boom That future boom, boom, boom Let me get it now Boom boom boom, gotta get-get Boom boom boom, gotta get-get Boom boom boom, now Boom boom boom, now Boom boom pow Boom boom pow I'm on the supersonic boom Y'all hear the spaceship zoom When, when I step inside the room

3 Term: Repetition Definition: Repeating a word or words for effect. Examples: Nobody No, nobody Can make it out here alone. Alone, all alone Nobody, but nobody Can make it out here alone. “Black Water” by the Doobie Brothers Old black water, keep on rollin' Mississippi moon, won't you keep on shinin' on me Old black water, keep on rollin' Mississippi moon, won't you keep on shinin' on me Old black water, keep on rollin' Mississippi moon, won't you keep on shinin' on me Yeah, keep on shinin' your light Gonna make everything, pretty mama Gonna make everything all right And I ain't got no worries 'Cause I ain't in no hurry at all

4 Term: Rhythm Definition: When words are arranged in such a way that they make a pattern or beat. Examples: There once was a girl from Chicago I’m making a pizza the size of the sun. “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” 'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there; The children were nestled all snug in their beds; While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads; And mamma in her 'kerchief, and I in my cap, Had just settled our brains for a long winter's nap, When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter, I sprang from my bed to see what was the matter.

5 Term: Rhyme Definition: When words have the same end sound. Example: Where Fair Air Bear Glare Term: Internal Rhyme Definition: a rhyme involving a word in the middle of a line and another at the end of the line or in the middle of the next. Example: “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door - Only this, and nothing more.'

6 Term: Literal Language Meaning Term: End Rhyme Definition: rhyme of the terminal (last) syllables of lines of poetry Example: “Vincent” Tim Burton persist_safety_mode=1&safe=active Term: Rhyme Scheme Definition: the ordered pattern of rhymes at the ends of the lines of a poem or verse. Starting with the letter A and continuing through the alphabet, each end sound is assigned a new letter. Example: Amazing Grace! How sweet that sound (a) I once was lost as I could be (b) I was blind, but now I see (b) My life has gone from lost to found (a)

7 Term: Alitteration Definition: the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words. Example: P eter P iper p icked a p ickled p epper.

8 Term: Consonance Definition: When consonant sounds repeat in the middle or end of words. Vowels: a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y. Consonants: all other letters. Examples: Ma mm als na m ed Ti m are cla mm y. I belie ve it would behoo ve Ste ve to lea ve.

9 Term: Assonance Definition: When vowel sounds repeat in a line of poetry Example: Fl ee t f ee t sw ee p by sl ee ping g ee se. And so, all the n i ght-t i de, I l i e down b y the s i de Of m y darling- m y darling- m y l i fe and m y br i de,

10 Practice Quiz I’ll put some lines of poetry on the board. Write down which techniques are used: Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia. Some poems use more than one technique.

11 1. The cuckoo in our cuckoo clock was wedded to an octopus. She laid a single wooden egg and hatched a cuckoocloctopus. Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia.

12 2. They are building a house half a block down and I sit up here with the shades down listening to the sounds, the hammers pounding in nails, thack thack thack thack, and then I hear birds, and thack thack thack, Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia.

13 3. very little love is not so bad or very little life what counts is waiting on walls I was born for this I was born to hustle roses down the avenues of the dead. Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia.

14 4.The whiskey on your breath Could make a small boy dizzy; But I hung on like death: Such waltzing was not easy. Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia.

15 5.Homework! Oh, homework! I hate you! You stink! I wish I could wash you away in the sink. Alliteration, consonance, rhythm, rhyme, and onomatopoeia.

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17 Term: Literal Language Meaning Definition: the meaning of words in their usual sense without metaphor Example: I’m freezing to death (literally.) Term: Figurative Language Meaning Definition: the meaning of words and phrases that have exaggerated or altered the usual meanings of the component words Example: I’m freezing to death (figuratively). Term: Connotative Meaning Definition: a commonly understood cultural of emotional association that a word of phrase carries Example: Snake (Greedy, Evil, Vicious)

18 Term: Analogy Definition: an extended comparison using multiple examples and situations It feels like we've been out at sea, oh, So back and forth that's how it seems, And when I wanna talk you say to me That if it's meant to be it will be. Whoa-oh-oh So crazy is this thing we call love, And now that we've got it, we just can't give up I'm reaching out for you, Get me out here in the water and I... I'm overboard And I need your love to pull me up I can't swim on my own It's too much Feels like I'm drowning without your love, So throw yourself out to me, my lifesaver. Life saver, oh life saver My life saver Life saver, oh life saver Whoa. “Overboard” by Justin Bieber

19 Term: Simile Definition: A comparison of two seemingly unlike things with like, as, or than; used to make a description more vivid Examples: Her eyes were like fireflies. The cast on Michael’s broken leg was like a plaster shackle. “The truth comes out a little at a time And it spreads just like a fire Slips off of your tongue like turpentine.” from “White Liar” by Miranda Lambert

20 Term: Metaphor Definition: a figure of speech that uses one thing to mean another and makes a direct comparison between the two. Examples: She hung her head: a dying flower. Arguing with her was dueling with hand grenades. “You are the thunder and I am the lightning.” from “Naturally” by Selena Gomez

21 Term: Hyperbole Definition: a highly exaggerated figure of speech (to wait forever and a day) Examples: Old Mr. Johnson has been teaching here since the Stone Age. Frank can knock a baseball off the continent. “When you come around, I get paralyzed.” “If I ever did that, I think I’d have a heart attack.” -- from “Heart Attack” by Demi Lovato

22 Term: Personification Definition: giving human abilities or traits to non-human things Examples: The moon turned over to face the day. One unhappy icicle wasted away in the day. “You start to freeze as horror looks you right between the eyes.” from “Thriller” by Michael Jackson

23 Term: Idiom Definition: an expression, word, or phrase that has a figurative meaning and/or connotative meaning that cannot be determined from the actual phrase or words “Now it's happened once or twice Someone couldn't pay the price And I'm afraid I had to rake 'em 'cross the coals.” “Flotsam, Jetsam, now I’ve got her, boys. The boss is on a roll!” -- “Poor Unfortunate Souls” from The Little Mermaid

24 Term: Dialect Definition: the language of a particular district, social class, or group of persons; used in literature as a tool of revealing character, class, or district. “Baby, you a song You make me wanna roll my windows down and cruise Down a back road blowin’ stop signs through the middle Every little farm town with you.” “I got my window down” --from “Cruise” by Florida Georgia Line feat. Nelly

25 Term: Imagery Definition: language that appeals to sight, smell, taste, sound, or touch “I am the one hiding under your bed Teeth ground sharp and eyes glowing red ….. I am the one hiding under yours stairs Fingers like snakes and spiders in my hair.” -- “ This is Halloween” from The Nightmare Before Christmas

26 Term: Symbolism Definition: frequent use of words, places, colors, characters, or objects that mean something beyond what they are on a literal level; a working/physical metaphor

27 Term: Allusion Definition: an implied or direct reference to something well-known in literature or history “One day you here, one day you there, one day you care You're so unfair sipping from the cup till it runneth over, Holy Grail.” --from “Holy Grail” by Jay Z feat. Justin Timberlake

28 Understatement Expressing an idea with significantly less force than is expected or would be required to accurately describe an idea Examples Let’s just say that Bill Gates has got a few nickles to rub together. Learning to juggle flaming chainsaws might be a little tricky at first. The middle of the street isn’t the best place for your child to play.

29 Practice Quiz 1. Justice is blind and, at times, deaf. 2. The typical teenage boy’s room is a disaster area. 3. Alan’s jokes were like flat soda to the children, surprisingly unpleasant. 4. The cactus saluted any visitor brave enough to travel the scorched land. 5. The job fair was a circus and John was a dancing bear. Hyperbole, personification, understatement, simile, metaphor

30 Practice Quiz 6. "I have to have this operation. It isn't very serious. I have this tiny little tumor on the brain.“ 7. The business world would chew you up and spit you out. 8. I have told you a million times not to lie! 9. Her hair was as soft as a spider web. 10. That joke is so old, the last time I heard it I was riding on a dinosaur. Hyperbole, personification, understatement, simile, metaphor

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