Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Awareness Appreciation Education Expectations Environment Credibility Relationship Responsiveness Resources Communicatio n Peril (risk) Inconveniences.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Awareness Appreciation Education Expectations Environment Credibility Relationship Responsiveness Resources Communicatio n Peril (risk) Inconveniences."— Presentation transcript:

1 Awareness Appreciation Education Expectations Environment Credibility Relationship Responsiveness Resources Communicatio n Peril (risk) Inconveniences Impact of “Influencers” A Subject’s* Willingness to Participate in a Clinical Trial is a Function of: The CTPQ Theory *subject, patient, volunteer, participant and/or their family member / care giver CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

2 Notes: For all ideas, ensure that you plan in advance to secure all necessary approvals and that you include ideas in budget proactively! CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

3 CTPQ FactorSolutions, Ideas, Best Practices Building awareness of the study – within your institution Grand rounds, disease committees, colleagues, team meetings; flyers, announcements; leverage patient navigators Interactive websites, CT booklets or lists summarizing active trials, tumor boards, study is active s, send out slot availability notices letting other staff know slots still open; bulletin boards Flyers, posters, resource binders reminders of ongoing studies still needing patients – monthly reminder messages to physicians, nurses, residents, fellows Lunch and learns, grand round presentations Faculty meetings, outreach with other departments Building awareness of the study – within the public at large Websites (public – CT.gov, patient association, cancer center), cancer information service, advertisements, presence at patient-focused events / fairs (e.g., healthfairs, cultural fairs, expos), letters to local MDs; ads In public transportation, social media; community outreach, traditional media ads (radio, TV, print) Reach out to local physicians with educational events, inperson visits to keep top of mind Think about high touch interactions with referring physicians and public vs. just high tech communications Ensure awareness materials are available in multiple languages Penny saver magazines Survivor workshops Community presentations Recognizing or appreciation the subject’s contribution Provide thank you cards, birthday cards, sympathy cards provide reimbursement; bank or debit cards for travel (pre-paid), good, gas, provide parking and lunch vouchers Build rapport – friendly staff; personal thanks from PI Small tokens of appreciation (as approved by IRB – such as med center note pad) Provide VIP –” Very important participant” buttons to patients and provide perks like valet or free parking, no waiting time, etc. Periodic calls or notes from the PI and staff thanking the patient and famiy CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

4 CTPQ FactorSolutions, Ideas, Best Practices Enhancing the subject’s understanding about clinical research in general Provide literature / patient education materials; walk them through the information; educational videos displayed in waiting rooms Patient education workshops / seminars (e.g., at patient advocacy groups, survivorship events) Provide education for staff on how to talk to patients about research CISCRP.org – aware for all research events and Medical Heroes information Spend adequate time to educate all patients not just research patients Ask me about research buttons (and other ideas from 1001 ideas book) Give info sheets about the phases of clinical trials and basic overview of drug and device development process Enhancing the subject’s understanding about clinical research about a particular trial Provide study-specific information; cancer websites Provide educational video prior to the formal consent process Use powerpiont presentations to emphasize key points from the consent Provide patient with higlighter and sticky notes to identify and flag areas they don’t understand Ensure information is available in multiple languages and that bilingual staff are available (or use medical translation services) Think of how you would react as a patient and speak from a point of view of being in their shoes Ensuring a comfortable and patient-friendly environment Smile! Provide mirrors for staff and remind them to smile before approaching patient Keep to appointment schedule (on time) Tidy and neat offices / rooms, calming color palette; take patients to discussion room vs. exam room for certain visits Provide refreshments Escorts or navigator to get patient to and from various departments Provide child care Private rooms; ensure patients are comfortable and feel their privacy is maintained Check in with the patient as they are in the waiting room and keep them informed of when they will be seen Provide water, snacks and other amenities CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

5 CTPQ FactorSolutions, Ideas, Best Practices Setting and managing expectations with the subject / families Improve communication, ask them, continuously assess their experiences and ask for feedback Give the patient day-to-day obligations and responsibilities, schedule with details Ensure that you have explained the importance of the data that comes from their participation and importance of complying with visits, dosing and all protocol requirements Manage expectations and route questions to the appropriate clinicians Enhancing credibility of the staff interacting with the subjects Edify each other, provide adequate training; Professionalism of staff; introduce the staff and highlight experience / certifications; honesty Train non-research staff in the basics Wear employee name badges; ensure they are visible Establish rapport - find something in common CICARE (Connect, Introduce Self, Communicate, Ask and Anticipate patient Needs, Respond to questions, Exit courteously) Educate your self in the disease state – make sure you are credible and confident and can speak from a place of knowledge Prepare questions you anticipate from the patient, read the consent form, conduct dry-run consent discussion so you are prepared to answer questions with confidence Enhancing interim and ongoing communication with the patients by the CRC Be aware; be available, be transparent; ensure patient has current contact information of site staff and vice versa Check in with patients between visits; text check in; provide cell phone # of staff Appointment reminder cards Use” My chart” patient portal (or equivalent) to keep in touch with patient Follow-up or call after appointments (especially initial) to see how patient is doing Respond to all calls and s promptly Provide newsletters with progress of study Provide information about where the patient can learn about the results (ct.gov) at end of trial and keep in touch with patient over the long run so they become research advocates or participate in future trials CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

6 CTPQ FactorSolutions, Ideas, Best Practices Enhancing interim and ongoing communication with the patients by the PI Be involved, encourage patients to contact office with questions Provide interim lab results and updates Provide contact information so patient/family can always reach the doctor Refresh the PI on the patient’s status, concerns, etc. before the PI sees the patient each visit Ensure the PI is present and spends time with the patient/family during the consent process Responding to patient / family concerns / questions Be timely in responses; go through risks and fully inform them, be available and be knowledgeable; provide FAQs on website for patients Provide # for patients to call for information; provide contact information for PI and CRC Schedule longer time during visits Provide on-call nurse Ensure patient thoroughly understands the informed consent information before they leave Involve family members in the consenting process Facilitating adequate resources for the subjects to participate Refer to social work, psycho or other departments to identify other support and resources Provide free parking Provide visit calendars Ensure stipends are reasonable and appropriate for the subject’s investment Negotiate better patient reimbursement rates with sponsors / CROs CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session

7 CTPQ FactorSolutions, Ideas, Best Practices Reducing risk / addressing safety concerns Process amendments quickly, follow the protocol Ongoing education Provide post-visit transportation if patient is uncomfortable Minimizing study burdens and inconveniences Pay for hotels / gas, combine visits if needed, provide parking passes, valet parking Home health nurse visits Provide convenient locations for lab and radiology procedures Combine standard of care and research procedures to minimize duplication of procedures Provide patient “ambassadors” (e.g., student volunteers)to help patients navigate through the facilities Keeping important influencers informed and engaged Have a communication plan; s / letters Spend time talking to them before the consenting visit; if possible and appropriate have the family member influencers present during the consent discussions Have PI follow-up with GP / Family Physician / Referring Physician CRC 3.0:Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies Brainstorming Ideas –Summarized from Beth Harper’s Session


Download ppt "Awareness Appreciation Education Expectations Environment Credibility Relationship Responsiveness Resources Communicatio n Peril (risk) Inconveniences."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google