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© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall R. GLENN HUBBARD ANTHONY PATRICK O’BRIEN Money, Banking, and the Financial System.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall R. GLENN HUBBARD ANTHONY PATRICK O’BRIEN Money, Banking, and the Financial System."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall R. GLENN HUBBARD ANTHONY PATRICK O’BRIEN Money, Banking, and the Financial System

2 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Introducing Money and the Financial System C H A P T E R Identify the key components of the financial system LEARNING OBJECTIVES After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Provide an overview of the financial crisis of 2007–2009 Explain the key issues and questions the financial crisis raises

3 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall CAN THE FED RESTORE THE FLOW OF MONEY? During the economic crisis that began in 2007, the financial system was disrupted as it hadn’t been since the 1930s. Large sections of the U.S. economy were cut off from the flow of funds they needed to thrive. Some government intervention was necessary to pull the economy out of a deep recession. During the recession, more than 8 million jobs were lost, GM declared bankruptcy, and some Wall Street investment houses disappeared. An Inside Look at Policy on page 20 reviews options the Fed considered to support the economy in late Introducing Money and the Financial System C H A P T E R 1

4 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 4 of Learning Objective Identify the key components of the financial system.

5 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5 of 38 Key Components of the Financial System 1.Financial assets An asset is anything of value owned by a person or a firm. A financial asset is an asset that represents a claim on someone else for a payment. 2.Financial institutions 3.The Federal Reserve and other financial regulators Three major components of the financial system:

6 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 6 of 38 Financial Assets Economists divide financial assets into those that are securities and those that aren’t. A security is a financial asset that can be bought and sold in a financial market. Financial markets are places or channels for buying or selling stocks, bonds, and other securities. Key Components of the Financial System

7 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 7 of 38 Financial Assets Five key categories of financial assets: 1.Money 2.Stocks 3.Bonds 4.Foreign exchange 5.Securitized loans Key Components of the Financial System

8 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 8 of 38 Financial Assets Money Anything that is generally accepted in payment for goods and services or to pay off debts. The money supply is the total quantity of money in the economy. Money Key Components of the Financial System

9 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 9 of 38 Financial Assets Stocks are financial securities that represent partial ownership of a firm; also called equities. Dividend A payment that a corporation makes to its shareholders. Stocks Key Components of the Financial System

10 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 10 of 38 Financial Assets Bond A financial security issued by a corporation or a government that represents a promise to repay a fixed amount of money. Interest rate The cost of borrowing funds (or the payment for lending funds), usually expressed as a percentage of the amount borrowed. Bonds Key Components of the Financial System

11 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 11 of 38 Financial Assets Foreign exchange Units of foreign currency. Foreign Exchange To buy foreign goods and services or foreign assets, a domestic business or a domestic investor must first exchange domestic currency for foreign currency. Banks engage in foreign currency transactions on behalf of investors and business firms. Key Components of the Financial System

12 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 12 of 38 Financial Assets Securitized Loans Before markets for loans were created, it wasn’t possible to sell loans. Loans were financial assets but not securities. Securitization The process of converting loans and other financial assets that are not tradable into securities. Note that what a saver views as a financial asset a borrower views as a financial liability. Financial liability A financial claim owed by a person or a firm. Key Components of the Financial System

13 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 13 of 38 Financial intermediary A financial firm, such as a bank, that borrows funds from savers and lends them to borrowers. Financial Institutions The financial system matches savers and borrowers through two channels: (1) Banks and other financial intermediaries (2) Financial markets Funds flow from lenders to borrowers indirectly through financial intermediaries, such as banks, or directly through financial markets, such as the New York Stock Exchange. Key Components of the Financial System

14 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 14 of 38 Figure 1.1 Moving Funds Through the Financial System The financial system transfers funds from savers to borrowers. Borrowers transfer returns back to savers through the financial system. Savers and borrowers include domestic and foreign households, businesses, and governments. Key Components of the Financial System

15 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 15 of 38 Commercial bank A financial firm that serves as a financial intermediary by taking in deposits and using them to make loans. Households rely on borrowing money from banks to purchase “big ticket items.” Firms rely on banks to meet their short- and long-term needs for credit. Some financial intermediaries, such as savings and loans, savings banks, and credit unions, are legally distinct from banks. Financial Institutions Financial Intermediaries Key Components of the Financial System

16 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 16 of 38 Making the Connection Pawn Shop Finance: What Happens to Small Businesses When Bank Lending Dries Up? Pawn shops typically make small loans at high interest rates. Before the financial crisis of , banks loosened lending requirements. During the crisis, defaults by households and firms increased dramatically. Loan losses during 2007–2009 were by far the largest since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Many banks cut small businesses off from credit, forcing them to borrow from pawn shops, family, or friends to operate. Key Components of the Financial System

17 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 17 of 38 Making the Connection Pawn Shop Finance: What Happens to Small Businesses When Bank Lending Dries Up? Key Components of the Financial System

18 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18 of 38 Nonbank Financial Intermediaries Insurance companies Pension funds Insurance companies collect premiums from customers then invest the premiums to obtain the funds necessary to pay claims and other costs. Pension funds invest contributions from workers and firms in stocks, bonds, and mortgages to earn the money necessary to make pension benefit payments. Key Components of the Financial System

19 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 19 of 38 Nonbank Financial Intermediaries Mutual funds Hedge funds Investment banks Portfolio A collection of assets, such as stocks and bonds. A mutual fund obtains money by selling shares to investors and invests the money in a portfolio of financial assets. Hedge funds are similar to mutual funds but typically have no more than 99 wealthy investors and make riskier investments. Investment banks concentrate on providing advice to firms issuing stocks and bonds or considering mergers with other firms. Key Components of the Financial System

20 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 20 of 38 Financial Markets Primary market A financial market in which stocks, bonds, and other securities are sold for the first time. Secondary market A financial market in which investors buy and sell existing securities. Financial markets are places or channels for buying and selling stocks, bonds, and other securities. Today, most securities trading takes place electronically between dealers linked by computers and is referred to as “over-the-counter” trading. Key Components of the Financial System

21 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 21 of 38 Making the Connection What Do People Do With Their Savings? Key Components of the Financial System

22 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 22 of 38 The Federal Reserve and Other Financial Regulators Federal agencies that regulate the financial system: Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Office of the Comptroller of the Currency The Federal Reserve System (the focus of this book) Key Components of the Financial System

23 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 23 of 38 The Federal Reserve is the central bank of the United States; usually referred to as “the Fed.” Established by Congress in 1913 to deal with banking problems. Original role: Serve as a lender of last resort. What Is the Federal Reserve? Key Components of the Financial System

24 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 24 of 38 The Fed is responsible for monetary policy. Monetary policy refers to the actions the Federal Reserve takes to manage the money supply and interest rates to pursue macroeconomic policy objectives. The Fed is divided into 12 districts (See Figure 1.2). The main policymaking body of the Fed is the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). Chair, Ben Bernanke from 2006 – present. The FOMC meets eight times per year. During these meetings, the Fed decides on a target for the federal funds rate. Federal funds rate The interest rate that banks charge each other on short- term loans. What Does the Federal Reserve Do? Key Components of the Financial System

25 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 25 of 38 Figure 1.2 The Federal Reserve System The Federal Reserve System is divided into 12 districts, each of which has a District Bank located in the city shown on the map. Key Components of the Financial System

26 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 26 of 38 Diversification Splitting wealth among many different assets to reduce risk. Risk sharing A service the financial system provides that allows savers to spread and transfer risk. What Does the Financial System Do? Risk Sharing The financial system provides three services to savers and borrowers: risk sharing, liquidity, and information. Risk is the chance that the value of financial assets will change relative to what you expect. Key Components of the Financial System

27 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 27 of 38 Liquidity The ease with which an asset can be exchanged for money. Financial markets and intermediaries help make financial assets more liquid. Information Facts about borrowers and about expectations of returns on financial assets. Financial markets convey information to both savers and borrowers by determining the prices of stocks, bonds, and other securities. Liquidity Information Key Components of the Financial System

28 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 28 of 38 Solved Problem The Services Provided by Securitized Loans Briefly discuss the extent to which securitized loans embody the key services of risk sharing, liquidity, and information. 1.1 Key Components of the Financial System

29 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 29 of 38 Solved Problem The Services Provided by Securitized Loans Solving the Problem Step 1Review the chapter material. Step 2Define securitized loans. Non-securitized loans are financial assets but not financial securities. Securitized loans are loans that have been bundled with other loans and resold to investors; they are both financial assets and financial securities. Step 3Explain whether securitized loans provide risk sharing, liquidity, and information. 1.When a mortgage is bundled together with other mortgage-backed securities, the buyers jointly share the risk of a default. 2.A securitized loan can be resold and so has a secondary market, which makes it liquid. 3.When loans are securitized, investors rely on the bank or other loan originator to have gathered the necessary information. So, securitized loans provide all three of these key services. 1.1 Key Components of the Financial System

30 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 30 of Learning Objective Provide an overview of the financial crisis of 2007–2009.

31 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 31 of 38 Bubble An unsustainable increase in the price of a class of assets. Origins of the Financial Crisis Overly optimistic expectations, and more importantly, changes in the mortgage market for made it easier for families to borrow money to buy houses. Two government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”), sold bonds to investors and used the funds to purchase mortgages from banks. Investment banks became significant participants in the mortgage market, bundling and selling mortgage-backed securities. The Financial Crisis of 2007–2009

32 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 32 of 38 Origins of the Financial Crisis Standards for obtaining loans were greatly loosened. By 2005, many mortgages were being issued to subprime borrowers with flawed credit histories. Adjustable-rate mortgages allowed borrowers to pay a very low interest rate. Both borrowers and lenders anticipated higher housing prices, which would reduce the chance of default. Unfortunately, the decline in housing prices that began in 2006 led to rising defaults and a sharp decline in the value of many mortgage-backed securities. The Financial Crisis of 2007–2009

33 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 33 of 38 Figure 1.3 The Housing Bubble Panel (a) shows that housing bubble resulted in rapid increases in both sales of new houses and housing prices between 2000 and 2005, followed by sharp decreases in sales and prices from early 2006 through early 2009 and then a slow revival. Panel (b) shows that home prices followed a similar pattern to home sales. Origins of the Financial Crisis The Financial Crisis of 2007–2009

34 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 34 of 38 The Deepening Crisis and the Response of the Fed and Treasury In October 2008, Congress passed the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), under which the Treasury provided funds to commercial banks in exchange for stock in those banks. Many policies of the Fed and Treasury during the recession of 2007–2009 were controversial because they involved: Partial government ownership of financial firms Implicit guarantees to large financial firms that they would not be allowed to go bankrupt Unprecedented intervention in financial markets Many feared that the Fed’s actions might reduce its independence. The Financial Crisis of 2007–2009

35 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 35 of Learning Objective Explain the key issues and questions the financial crisis raises.

36 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 36 of 38 Key Issues and Questions from the Financial Crisis Our brief account of the financial crisis raises a number of questions that we will answer in the following chapters. The 17 key issues and questions listed on textbook pages 17 – 19 provide a roadmap for the topics in the rest of the book.

37 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 37 of 38 AN INSIDE LOOK AT POLICY Fed Ready to Help Economy, but Options Are Limited Key Points in the Article Wall Street Journal, Bernanke Prepared to Take New Steps Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke expressed doubts about the effectiveness of the actions the Fed usually takes to spur the economy, such as lowering the discount rate, lowering the federal funds rate, or lowering reserve requirements. He outlined three other possible options: 1.Announce the Fed’s intention to keep short-term interest rates low. 2.The Fed could lower the interest rate it paid banks on required reserves (from 0.25 percent). 3.The Fed could buy additional securities with the proceeds of maturing mortgage securities.

38 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 38 of 38 AN INSIDE LOOK AT POLICY The Fed was very aggressive in using its discount window to pump reserves into the banking system in 2008 and 2009.


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