Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Session 3 Thursday, August 14, 2014. Session Overview Identify the state level opportunities available to migrant students and school districts (including.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Session 3 Thursday, August 14, 2014. Session Overview Identify the state level opportunities available to migrant students and school districts (including."— Presentation transcript:

1 Session 3 Thursday, August 14, 2014

2 Session Overview Identify the state level opportunities available to migrant students and school districts (including summer programs). Describe the student selection process. Provide timelines for student participation. Distribute materials that will benefit mobile migrant students.

3 NEW! State Level Opportunities Dare to Dream Voices from the Field – Science and Art Summer Programs Binational Program Binational Teacher Exchange Technology Support (INET) CONEVyT (family literacy) Out-of-School Youth

4 Dare to Dream Academy

5 Dare to Dream Dare to Dream – Exploring Your Future Targeting 300 students currently enrolled in 8 th /9 th grade entering 9 th and 10 th grade the following school year. Partnership with the College Assistance Migrant Programs at EWU, UW, and CWU. Program development in partnership with Association of Washington School Principals

6 Dare to Dream Dare to Dream – Exploring Your Future Outcomes: Build self-efficacy and leadership skills to complete high school and pursue post-secondary education. Identify career path that will utilize his/her innate strengths. Meet professional individuals and have opportunity to discuss profession. Visit university departments to gain understanding of university lifestyle. Develop an individual academic plan for remaining high school years. Learn about scholarship and FAFSA opportunities and timelines. Interact with college students (mentors) similar to their socio- economic background, with similar family, cultural, and educational barriers. Opportunity to share their experiences with parent advisory council, school board, other students, and community organizations..5 Credit by AWSP – Dropout Prevention II Recorded in MSIS as Supplemental Services Academic Guidance, Career Education, and Postsecondary Prep

7 Dare to Dream: Exploring Your Future AWSP Course Title and Description Dropout Prevention II The Dare to Dream course is targeted at students who have been identified as being at risk of dropping out of or failing in school. Course content includes study skills and individual tutorials; job preparation, readiness, application, or interview skills; communication skills; personal assessment and awareness activities; speaker presentations; and small group seminars.

8

9 Dare to Dream Dare to Dream Academic Academy Targeting 160 currently enrolled 10 th and 11 th grade migrant students moving into 11 th and 12 th grade Partnership with: WSU (Math and Science) – 2 sessions CWU (Science) UW (Science)

10 Dare to Dream Dare to Dream Academic Academy Program Outcomes: Identify current knowledge level of math or science Learn new skills and abilities in the area of math or science Identify career paths in the areas of math or science Learn about the fields of study in math or science Identify course needed to graduate from high school, how to request support Share academy experience with Parent Advisory Council, other students, and local community Earn.5 credit in math or science (AWSP Unified Science II 03202; Informal Mathematics II 02001) Recorded in MSIS as supplemental service instructional math or science

11 Dare to Dream Academic Academy AWSP Course: Unified Science II Unified Science courses combine more than one branch of science into a cohesive study or may integrate science with another discipline. General scientific concepts are explored, as are the principles underlying the scientific method and experimentation techniques. AWSP Course: Informal Mathematics II Informal Mathematics courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning, and highlight the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. These courses approach the teaching of general math, pre-algebra, and pre-geometry topics by applying numbers, and algebraic and geometric concepts and relationships to real world problems.

12

13 Association of Washington School Principals Helped set the tone for each day. Provided on-going guidance to University instructors and/or led portions of the instruction. Reviewed student journals every night to see if concepts were being understood by students and to ensure students were capturing the instruction. Provided comment or feedback to students in journals. Worked with university staff if some students appeared to need additional supports.

14 Voices from the Field

15 Targeted to 6 th and 7 th grade students entering 7 th and 8 th grade. Partnership with Islandwood, Bainbridge Island Outcomes: Conduct project-based science and exploration through forest, water, and soil investigations. Conduct scientific observations (scientific method) and enhance writing skills. Practice math skills using data collection methods. Develop creative expression through music and visual arts Practice journal writing and reflection Develop team-building and leadership skills through Teams Course

16

17 Voices from the Field Arts Program – Coming Soon!

18 Summer School Programs Binational Teacher Program Math MATTERS/Math MASTERS Program Engineering is Elementary (EiE) Curriculum Usain Bolt lesson Field experiences tied to academic content

19 Binational Program Purpose is to minimize the academic impact of a migrant student moving between USA and MX. Develop services and programs for Binational Students. Washington State participating in InET (Innovative Educational Technologies) consortium led by state of Colorado. Washington State Migrant Student Data, Recruitment, and Support Office

20 Binational Programs YAKIMA 142 EAST WENATCHEE 32 CONNELL 15 BREWSTER 135 ORONDO 27 OROVILLE 14 BRIDGEPORT 120 TONASKET 27 PROSSER 14 PASCO 96 GRANDVIEW 26 BASIN CITY 13 MATTAWA 62 SUNNYSIDE 25 ROYAL CITY 13 WENATCHEE 55 TIETON 23 MOXEE 12 MOUNT VERNON 52 MABTON 22 CHELAN 11 KENNEWICK 46 WAPATO 20 ELTOPIA 11 TOPPENISH 38 MESA 17 WINLOCK 10 OTHELLO 35 MOSES LAKE 17 ZILLAH 10 WARDEN 34 BELLINGHAM 16 PESHASTIN 9 QUINCY 33 CASHMERE 15 ELLENSBURG 8 MSIS MOBILITY REPORT Count Of Students From Mexico To Washington Cities School Year

21 Binational Programs MANSON 8 SOAP LAKE 4 CUSTER 2 ARLINGTON 1 PATERSON 8 CONWAY 3 ENTIAT 2 DESERT AIRE 1 UNION GAP 7 EPHRATA 3 ENUMCLAW 2 LONGVIEW 1 CENTRALIA 6 GRANGER 3 LONG BEACH 2 NOOKSACK 1 COWICHE 6 MALOTT 3 LOOMIS 2 WALLA 1 OKANOGAN 6 NACHES 3 MOSSYROCK 2 SEDRO WOOLLEY 6 PRESCOTT 3 PLYMOUTH 2 MALAGA 5 SEAVIEW 3 PORT TOWNSEND 2 PATEROS 5 WATERVILLE 3 ROCK ISLAND 2 BENTON CITY 4 ABERDEEN 2 TOUCHET 2 EVERSON 4 BEVERLY 2 WHITE SALMON 2 SNOHOMISH 4 BUENA 2 WOODLAND 2 MSIS MOBILITY REPORT Count Of Students From Mexico To Washington Cities School Year

22 Binational Teacher Exchange To reinforce knowledge about the history, culture, values and national traditions of Mexican origin students who live in the US; strengthening their identity and improving their education. To encourage ongoing communication between US and Mexican teachers in order to share educational experiences that promote continuity of educational practices. To improve the educational services offered to the Mexican and Mexican descendent school population living in the US through the binational teacher exchange program.

23 Binational Teacher Exchange Timeline

24 InET (Innovative Educational Technologies) Migrant educators and administrators in the states with the most experience in binational migrant programs identified concerns for binational migrant students as described below. Missing school because they lack proper paperwork (e.g., Apostille, Certificate of Completion from Mexico, Transfer Document). Lacking credits for coursework completed (i.e., reciprocity in credit transfer). Having less time for instruction resulting in poor achievement due to high mobility. Lacking access to technology to help students succeed and stay in school. Falling behind in language development. When in the U.S., binational students’ lack of English proficiency puts them behind their peers; when returning to Mexico, binational students’ lack of Spanish proficiency puts them behind their peers. Accessing educational and community services when making frequent international moves is difficult and often results in educational and social isolation. Training is needed for instructors on the binational migrant lifestyle and for effective strategies for this population which results in more effective instruction

25 CONEVyT One of the highlights of this program is the scheduling flexibility to offer courses and classes that will meet the needs of the students regardless of geographic location. Plazas Comunitarias are not exclusive to the educational programs offered on their online menus but offer the flexibility for schools, institutions, and groups involved in the Plazas Comunitarias to provide additional programs and resources deemed necessary. They complement the educational requirements of their communities. In addition, this program is free of charge to those 15 years of age and older regardless of their country of origin. Each Plaza Comunitaria selects the services it will provide. It can offer a specific service and, as the need arises, augment it by adding and integrating other services and offerings based on the needs of the community and the resources available.

26 CONEVyT Getting Started, two options: 1. Become a Plaza Comunitaria or 2. Become a member of an existing Plaza Comunitaria. To become a Plaza Comunitaria, contact the Migrant Education Program at OSPI (Terrie Beckman) so she may work with Mexican Consulate for technology and training logistics. To become a member of an existing Plaza, contact the Plaza’s in the handout.

27 Out-of-School Youth What is the definition of “out-of-school youth?” Are such youth eligible for MEP services? (Office of Migrant Education Non-Regulatory Guidance, 2010) For the purposes of the MEP, the Department considers the term “out-of-school youth” to mean youth up through age 21 who are entitled to a free public education in the State and who meet the definition of “migratory child,” but who are not currently enrolled in a K-12 school. This could include students who have dropped out of school, youth who are working on a general education development credential (GED) outside of a K-12 school, and youth who are “here-to-work” only. It would not include children in preschool. Out-of-school youth who meet the definition of a “migratory child” as well as all other MEP eligibility criteria are eligible for the MEP.

28 Out-of-School Youth Students ages Recover back into high school Refer to other services – GED, HEP, ESL, etc. Facilitate access to social support services, especially to those “here-to-work” MSIS Report – Student List MSDRS OSY Facilitator work with Non-Project SDs

29

30

31 Capturing Referred Services

32 Student Selection 1. Priority Migrant Student – had an interrupted school year within the last 12 months (excluding summer) and has not yet met standard on most recent state exam including End-of-Course exams or, if state assessment results are unavailable, is enrolled in Bilingual Education Program, is two-years above age from their same grade-level peers, or is credit deficient (at-risk of not graduating within expected year of graduation). 2. Needs Migrant Student – has not yet met standard on most recent state exam, including End-of-Course exams or, if state assessment results unavailable, is enrolled in Bilingual Education Program, is at least two years or more above age level for same grade-level peers, or is credit deficient (at-risk of not graduating within expected year of graduation) – other risk factors. 3. Migrant Students – currently eligible migrant students who have met state academic assessment standards and have not recently moved.

33 MSIS Student Needs Assessment Report (msdr.org) Most recent data available across the state. Selection criteria is on the same basis.

34

35

36

37

38

39 Dare to Dream Timeline Nov-Dec OSPI identifies eligible students and works with MSDRS to populate on-line registration system. Jan-Feb OSPI releases notice to districts of Dare to Dream registration information and registration process. OSPI releases notice to Dare to Dream students informing them of their eligibility to participate (Note: notice will go to PFS students only). April Registration deadline April 17. May Permission forms must be completed and submitted to MSDRS by May 15. Confirmation notice with transportation information, bus Passport, packing information to be sent by May 25. Events to begin end of June

40 Voices from the Field Science and Arts Timeline Nov-Dec OSPI identifies eligible students and works with MSDRS to populate on-line registration system. February OSPI releases notice to districts of registration information and registration process. April Registration deadline May (TBD). May Permission forms must be completed and submitted to Islandwood by June (TBD). Events to begin end of June

41 Questions?

42 Contacts Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program OSPI Mea Moore, Director Migrant Student Data, Recruitment, and Support Sunnyside School District Lee Campos, Director Migrant Education Health Program North Central ESD Mike Taylor, Program Supervisor Educational Service District 105, Yakima Cynthia Juarez, Director , Pasco Nicole Castilleja, Coordinator (North Central), Wenatchee Mary Jane Ross, Academic Achievement Specialist (Northwest), Anacortes Patricia Bennett, Coordinator

43 GOODIES TO DISTRIBUTE


Download ppt "Session 3 Thursday, August 14, 2014. Session Overview Identify the state level opportunities available to migrant students and school districts (including."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google