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September 25, 2013  “The Dare”  Vocabulary (continued) ENGLISH 090.

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Presentation on theme: "September 25, 2013  “The Dare”  Vocabulary (continued) ENGLISH 090."— Presentation transcript:

1 September 25, 2013  “The Dare”  Vocabulary (continued) ENGLISH 090

2 This personal narrative, by freelance writer Roger Hoffmann, tells how the author as a 12-year-old took a dangerous dare. Though the event occurred many years in the author’s past, he is able to recall a number of specific details of the setting, particularly the train, and some significant dialogue. As you read the story (which first appeared in the New York Times), ask yourself how Hoffmann holds readers’ attention, maintaining suspense until the end. The Dare

3 1. Summarize the story’s primary action in several sentences, and identify the climax. Name several word groups the author uses to keep the action connected from one paragraph to the next. 2. Showing and telling are crucial to effective storytelling. What does Hoffman show us in paragraph 7, and how does this affect the suspense in the story? 3. What do you think the meaning of this story is for Hoffman, and where in the story does he make this clear? 4. If you think the introductory paragraph is effective, what makes it work? Look especially at the first sentence. Write out the thesis sentence. The Dare

4  If you don’t know a term, keep reading. The author may give you clues.  Again, the specific definition might not be given, but the author may offer examples that tell you exactly what the word means.  Examples are often introduced with such signal words as including and such as. Vocabulary: Elaborating Details and Examples

5  A former employee, irate over having been fired, broke into the plant and deliberately wrecked several machines.  Despite the proximity of Ron’s house to his sister’s he rarely sees her.  The car wash we organized to raise funds was a fiasco, for it rained all day. Vocabulary: Elaborating Details and Examples

6  A former employee, irate over having been fired, broke into the plant and deliberately wrecked several machines.  Despite the proximity of Ron’s house to his sister’s he rarely sees her.  The car wash we organized to raise funds was a fiasco, for it rained all day. Vocabulary: General Sense of the Sentence

7  He was born to a family that possessed great wealth, but he died in indigence.  My friend Julie is a great procrastinator. She habitually postpones doing things, from household chores to homework.  Since my grandfather retired, he has developed such avocations as gardening and bike riding.  The Lizard was so lethargic that I wasn’t sure if it was alive or dead. It didn’t even blink.

8 Vocabulary: General Sense of the Sentence  The public knows very little about the covert activities of CIA spies.  Many politicians do not give succinct answers to questions, but long, vague ones.  Because my father had advised me to scrutinize the lease, I took time to carefully examine all the fine print.  In biology class, the teacher discussed such anomalies as two heads and webbed toes on a human being.

9 The author might offer a comparison or contrast to help readers better understand. They will use a more familiar term to help explain an unfamiliar term. KEEP READING! Vocabulary: Comparison and Contrast

10 Vocabulary: Vocabulary: Synonyms In such cases, the synonyms are usually set off by special punctuation within the sentence, such as commas, dashes, or parentheses; and they may be introduced by or and that is.

11 Vocabulary: Vocabulary: Synonyms A synonym may also appear anywhere in a sentence as a restatement of the meaning of the unknown word. 1. Are you averse—opposed to—the decision? 2. His naivete, or innocence, was obvious. 3. The salesperson tried to assuage the angry customer’s feeling, but there was no way to soothe her.

12 The clue might be a word that means the exact opposite. Antonyms are often signaled by words and phrases such as however, but, yet, on the other hand, and in contrast. “Some passive belief systems call for nonconfrontational behavior; yet others call for rebellion. “ Vocabulary: Antonym

13 1.My sister Ann is lively and outgoing; however, I am rather introverted. 2. Religions in America are not static, but changing, especially in this period of shifting values. 3. Many people have pointed out the harmful effects that a working mother may have on the family, yet there are many salutary effects as well. 4.Some passive belief systems call for nonconfrontational behavior; yet others call for rebellion. “ Vocabulary: Antonym

14 Blocked by her family and publicly maligned, Florence Nightingale struggled against prevailing norms to carve out her occupation. She was the daughter of a wealthy gentry family, an from her father she received a man’s classical education. Women of her milieu were expected to be educated only in domestic arts. Vocabulary: Using Context Clues

15 1.The overcooked cauliflower emitted a FOUL, lingering odor. 2.With April 15 looming, the woman began to COMB the den for her missing W2 forms. 3.What she enjoyed most about the early morning was that the world seemed to STILL. Vocabulary: Multiple Meanings

16  Prefix + base word or root  Base word or root + suffix  Prefix + base word or root + suffix  Roots, prefixes, and suffixes have their own separate meaning and can be looked up individually in a dictionary.  These meanings suggest the overall meanings of the words they compose. Vocabulary: Word Structure

17  A PREFIX is a letter of group of letters that come at the beginning of a word.  A prefix alters the meaning of a word.  For example, adding the prefix un to the word “happy” changes the meaning of “happy” to the opposite of happy.  In addition, sometimes adding a prefix changes the part of speech. Vocabulary: Word Structure

18  An example of this adding the prefix dis to the adjective “able” which produces the verb “disable.”  Because of their significant impact on root words, prefixes are the most frequent word part studied. Vocabulary: Word Structure

19 A SUFFIX is a word part added to the end of the word. It does not generally alter a word’s meaning, but it will often change a word from one part of speech to another. For example, when the suffix -ness is placed after the adjective “kind,” the results is the noun “kindness.” Vocabulary: Word Structure

20 A ROOT is a basic word to which prefixes and suffixes can be added. It cannot be further separated into parts and is fairly constant in form and meaning. It can be found at the beginning, middle, or end of a word. Vocabulary: Word Structure

21 Be aware that there are times when a group of letters appears to be a prefix, suffix, or root, but it is not. For instance, the prefix anti- means “against” or “opposite of” as in “antisocial.” However, anti- is not a prefix in the work “anticipate” or “antique.” Vocabulary: Word Structure

22 Learning word parts is very useful in building one’s vocabulary. Roots and prefixes come from Greek and Latin words. One Latin or Greek word may provide the clue to a dozen or more English words. Vocabulary: Word Structure

23 One expert said that ten Latin words and two Greek words are the basis for 2,500 English words. The prefix pseudo which means “false” is at the beginning of 800 words. The root anthrop which means “mankind” is used to begin 112 words. Therefore, studying word parts is an efficient way to improve a person’s word knowledge. Vocabulary: Word Structure

24 Prefix/Root/Suffic meaning: Quiz Time: Vocabulary: Word Structure


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