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 Relationships of psychological and physiological variables are an important area of study  Different styles of coping have different implications for.

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Presentation on theme: " Relationships of psychological and physiological variables are an important area of study  Different styles of coping have different implications for."— Presentation transcript:

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2  Relationships of psychological and physiological variables are an important area of study  Different styles of coping have different implications for cardiovascular health  What effects do different styles of coping have on heart rate variability?

3  Cardiovascular Disease is the number one cause of death in the U.S. (CDC, 2005)  Important to examine relationships between cardiovascular disease and controllable factors  Early intervention may be key

4  Measure of changes in heart rate that vary by situation (Malik, 1996)  Can be used to measure relationships between physiological states and emotional ones (Appelhans & Luecken, 2006)  Certain types of emotion processing can lead to higher heart rates (Low, Stanton, & Bower, 2008)

5  Higher HRV is good– shows you are more adaptive! (Appelhans & Leucken, 2006)  People may have lower HRV when in stressful situations (Lyonfields, 1996)

6  Coping styles can have implications for physical health  People who ruminate about anger have higher blood pressure (Hogan & Linden, 2004)  Repressive coping style is associated with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and death (Denollet et al., 2008)

7  People who repress anger are more likely to become victims of early death (Harburg et al., 2003)  Clear that coping methods have important interactions with cardiovascular health

8  We used the Brief COPE › 28-item questionnaire › Measures 14 different coping mechanisms  Developed by Charles S. Carver  Demonstrated internal validity (Carver, 1997)  Briefer version of the full-scale COPE (Carver, 2007)

9  My research will determine what relationships exist between types of coping and Heart Rate Variability in response to a stressful event

10  Part of a larger study intended to collect different types of data  Study was done in 2 phases, each about 1 hour long › Phase I: Battery of questionnaires, including the Brief COPE › Phase II: HRV, blood pressure, and cholesterol measurements, and another brief questionnaire

11  Eligibility › Enrollment in psychology course › 18 years old › Fluent in English › Participants were excluded if they could not fast the night before Phase II  UNT undergraduate psychology students receiving course credit › Recruited through SONA system › Final Sample: 501 Phase I participants, 297 Phase II participants  Representative sample of overall student population of UNT, taking into account race, age, and sex

12  Appelhans, B.M., & Luecken, L.J. (2006). Heart rate variability as an index of regulated emotional responding. Review of General Psychology, 10,  Carver, C.S. (1997). You want to measure coping but your protocol’s too long: Consider the Brief COPE. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 4,  Carver, C.S. (2007). Brief COPE. Retrieved March 11, 2009, from University of Miami, Department of Psychology Web site:  Center for Disease Control. (2005, November 9). Deaths: Final Data for 2002, tables 9, 10. Retrieved March 11, 2009, from  Hogan, B.E., & Linden, W. (2004). Anger response styles and blood pressure: At least don’t ruminate about it! Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 27  Denollet, J., Conraads, V.M., Martens, E.J., Nyklicek, I., & de Gelder, B. (2008). Clinical events in coronary patients who report low distress: Adverse effect of repressive coping. Health Psychology, 27,  Harburg, E., Julius, M., Kaciroti, N., Gleiberman, L., & Schork, M.A. (2003). Expressive/suppressive anger- coping responses, gender, and types of mortality: A 17-year follow-up (Tecumseh, Michigan, ). Psychosomatic Medicine, 65,  Low, C.A., Stanton, A.L., & Bower, J.E. (2008). Effects of acceptance-oriented versus evaluative emotional processing on heart rate recovery and habituation. Emotion, 8,  Lyonfields, J.D. (1996). The impact of mental activity, affective content, and chronic worry on heart rate variability. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, 57,  Malik, M. (1996). Heart rate variability: Standards of measurement, physiological interpretation, and clinical use. Circulation, 93,

13  Joseph Doster, Ph. D., Professor, Department of Psychology  Joseph Critelli, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychology  Andrea Kirk, Ph.D., Lecturer, Honors College  Susan Eve, Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Honors College  Gloria Cox, Ph.D., Dean of the Honors College  Warren Burggren, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences  Wendy Wilkins, Ph.D., Provost and V.P. of Academic Affairs  Gretchen Bataille, Ph.D., President of the University of North Texas


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