Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Luddites 1. England’s Distress in 1811-1813 In 1812 the government probably had reason to be fearful: – a large part of the army was overseas, mainly.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Luddites 1. England’s Distress in 1811-1813 In 1812 the government probably had reason to be fearful: – a large part of the army was overseas, mainly."— Presentation transcript:

1 Luddites 1

2 England’s Distress in In 1812 the government probably had reason to be fearful: – a large part of the army was overseas, mainly in the Peninsular with Wellington;Wellington – the country was fighting not only the French but also the Americans – England was experiencing the worst trade depression since the 1760s and people were suffering great hardship. as evidenced by the Sheffield riots of 1812 Source: l

3 Causes Poverty – Harsh economic times because of the Napoleonic wars Non-enforcement of laws meant to protect workers Minimum wage bill 1808 (decreased wages) Deteriorating working conditions Combination Acts – Banned trade unions Mechanical Looms and spinners replacing skilled craftsman

4 Mills

5 Working Conditions in the Mills

6 Who? 19 th Century English Handicraftsmen Ned Ludd – apprentice who smashed his bosses shearing frame with a hammer

7 Mythic Hero? Ned Ludd mythical person? Ned Ludd was reputed to live in Sherwood Forest. They said Ned Ludd was an idiot boy That all he could do was wreck and destroy, And He turned to his workmates and said: Death to Machines. They tread on our future and they stamp on our dreams. Robert Calvert

8 The cause of it all? The type of instrument destroyed by Ned Ludd A Stocking frame was a machine that knitted stocking or socks – Frame-Breaking Act (capital crime)

9 The Luddite Rebellion Riots Nottinhamshire – Nov 1811 West Riding of Yorkshire – Jan 1812 West Riding of Yorkshire Lancashire – March 1813 Sutton’s Mill, Nottinghamshire

10 Government Response Felt it had to establish control Provide good business climate Repress and control unruly labor groups No attempt to alleviate cause of social disruption

11 The End of Luddism Male workers gained the right to vote Trade unions became legal 49 luddites killed in riots by government forces 24 were executed 34 transported to Australia More than 20 others given long term prison sentences

12 Political Consequences Changed the views of many influential people – Especially Lord Byron who spoke at the trials of several luddites, and Earl Fitzwilliam, Lord Lieutenant of the West Riding of Yorkshire. Brought rights of workers to the attention of the public Began debate about industrialization Look at both the positive and negative effects of industrialization Govt. could no longer ignore the plight of workers Technology is never neutral


Download ppt "Luddites 1. England’s Distress in 1811-1813 In 1812 the government probably had reason to be fearful: – a large part of the army was overseas, mainly."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google