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By Kaylee Lawson and Sam Norton. Alzheimer's Disease (AD)  Alzheimer’s Disease is a type of memory loss, that slowly gets worse over time.  There are.

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Presentation on theme: "By Kaylee Lawson and Sam Norton. Alzheimer's Disease (AD)  Alzheimer’s Disease is a type of memory loss, that slowly gets worse over time.  There are."— Presentation transcript:

1 By Kaylee Lawson and Sam Norton

2 Alzheimer's Disease (AD)  Alzheimer’s Disease is a type of memory loss, that slowly gets worse over time.  There are two types of AD. The first type is “early onset AD” which is where symptoms become visible before the age of 60. This type of AD seems to grow more quickly, and tends to be more genetic.  Late onset AD is the second type. This type is where the symptoms become noticeable after the age of 60. There is no clear evidence that this type of AD runs in the family.  AD effects the following: Language, Memory, Perception, Emotional behavior, personality, and judgment. It also effects everyday skills, such as going to the bathroom and washing your hands.  The disease is irreversible and there is currently no cure. About 5-6% of the US population has AD. Amongst grown ups, Alzheimer's disease is the fourth leading cause of death. "Alzheimer's Disease." 10/04/10. n. pag. Web. 10 Nov

3 Amnesia  Unlike Alzheimer's Disease, Amnesia can be caused by a sudden injury or extreme damage to the brain such as a stroke, brain inflammation, or oxygen deprivation in your brain.  Amnesia is a loss of memories, such as facts, experiences and information. It generally doesn’t cause the loss of self-identity.  Effects of Amnesia can last a very long time. Some people say that their amnesia has changed from different conditions, which makes them lose confidence in their own memory.  The two main types of Amnesia are Anterograde Amnesia and Retrograde Amnesia:  “Anterograde Amnesia: the loss of short-term memory, and the loss or impairment of the ability to form new memories. Forgetting people or events after a few seconds.” (Amnesia)  “Retrograde Amnesia: loss of pre-existing memories to conscious memory, beyond an ordinary degree of forgetfulness. Being able to memorize things after the incident but unable to recall incidences prior to the onset.” (Amnesia) "Amnesia." 10/04/10. n. pag. Web. 10 Nov

4 Repressed Memory  Amnesia of childhood sexual abuse is a very significant condition. Repression is one explanation for this condition.  People who are sexually abused when they are kids, often repress the memories. Many of these people grow up believing that it never even happened. When these people become adults, they sometimes start to vaguely remember the events.  Once people recover the memories of what happen in their childhood, they have to go through many years of therapy. This is still a huge debate between many physiatrists.  In some cases, people remember the events so well, that they are actually able to accuse someone, and put that person in jail for the sexual abuse.  “The core findings showed that controlling unwanted memories was associated with increased activation of the left and right frontal cortex (the part of the brain used to repress memory), which in turn led to reduced activation of the hippocampus (the part of the brain used to remember experiences).” (Trei) Trei, Lisa. "Psychologists offer proof of brain’s ability to suppress memories." 01/08/2004. n. pag. Web. 9 Nov

5 How Memory Works  “Recalling memories re-starts many of the same neural paths we initially used to sense the experience and almost re-creates the event that happened.” (Holladay)  Everybody stores sensory information in areas located throughout the cortex. Some of the data gets stored in the short term memory and others are stored in the long term memory.  “Memories of concepts and ideas are related to sensed experiences because we extract the essence from sensed experiences to form generalized concepts. “(Holladay)  The data that we need or catches our attention is stored in our short term memory, which is held for usually half a minute.  Information that could help us in the future or life lessons are stored in our long term memory, which are there our entire lives.  The long term memory has three processes which are Encoding, storage, and retrieval. Holladay, April. “How The Memory Works." 3/12/2007. n. pag. Web. 9 Nov

6 Sources!  "Alzheimer's Disease." 10/04/10. n. pag. Web. 10 Nov  "Amnesia." 10/04/10. n. pag. Web. 10 Nov  Trei, Lisa. "Psychologists offer proof of brain’s ability to suppress memories." 01/08/2004. n. pag. Web. 9 Nov  Holladay, April. “How The Memory Works." 3/12/2007. n. pag. Web. 9 Nov


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