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NCDOC Statewide Conference on Offender Reentry “Shaping the Future of Transition” May 1-3, 2007 Asheville, NC.

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Presentation on theme: "NCDOC Statewide Conference on Offender Reentry “Shaping the Future of Transition” May 1-3, 2007 Asheville, NC."— Presentation transcript:

1 NCDOC Statewide Conference on Offender Reentry “Shaping the Future of Transition” May 1-3, 2007 Asheville, NC

2 Presenters:  Carlton Joyner, Transition Coordinator, NCDOC/DOP  Mary Mueller, Director, Diagnostic Services, NCDOC/DOP  Rose True, Director, Education Services, NCDOC/DOP  Laura Yates, MSW, LCSW-P, Social Work Program Director, NCDOC/DOP

3 Secretary Theodis Beck Transition Policy Statement (February, 2003) “The DOC is working hard to prepare inmates for their release, so they leave prison and become productive citizens who contribute positively to their communities. Through hard work and preparation in prison and with community support after time served, we can provide ex-offenders another opportunity to be productive members of society.”

4 DOP Initiatives  Transition Coordinator  Serves as the point person for the Divisions transition initiative and coordinates our transition efforts.  DOP Transition Workgroup  In September 06 a workgroup was put together with the mission of developing a plan for the delivery of transition services throughout the Division of Prisons.  This plan should include all inmates and address all issues surrounding offender reentry.

5 Research for the Plan:  NIC From Prison to Community model  State visits to Indiana / Missouri and reviewed material from the states of Kansas, Maryland, Connecticut Michigan and New Jersey.  The workgroup has now split into subcommittees by populations:  Close / Medium Custody Males  Minimum Custody  Females  Youthful Offenders

6 Research for the Plan:  Each subcommittee is currently developing the plan for their perspective population to include:  the programs & services to be provided  time frame to have inmates involved in programs,  the community resources that should be utilized  how they should be utilized  the role of community partners in the process  include faith based, non-profit & governmental agencies.  Goal: Plan development and implementation prior to the end of 2007.

7 What We Have Done  We developed a process in which our facilities could refer inmates to VR for services prior to their release.  Over the course of the last 9 months of 2006,103 inmates were referred in comparison to 33 for all of 2005.

8 What We Have Done contd.  We recently developed a process to inform all inmates of their rights to vote and the procedure they would have to follow to be eligible to vote.

9 Staff Training  “Fundamentals of Case Management”  The course teaches Case Management Techniques to aid the staff in providing case management / transition services.  Provides training in CBI, understanding the Stages of Change, techniques for Motivational Interviewing and the Principles of Effective Intervention.

10 Other Activities.....  Developing methods to better utilize technology and streamline processes  Program Assessment

11 In the Beginning..... (It all begins in the Diagnostic Center……)

12 Now…..

13 POLICY & PROCEDURES: Diagnostic Centers  In addition to the services provided by an admitting facility, the diagnostic center:  (1) enters social and criminal data into the electronic record;  (2) administers and scores psychometric tests;  (3) provides casework services for crisis intervention as necessitated by immediate problems of or with an inmate being processed;  (4) evaluates each case to identify crime-related problems, correctional goals, need for outer controls, and other factors relating to the classification process.  (b) A diagnostic center must provide psychological examination services, psychiatric evaluations, professional casework services, and case evaluations by personnel professionally qualified to interpret reports from the various professional disciplines. This information is made into a classification action on which crime-related problem identification and correctional intervention may be based. The Diagnostic Center staff must meet minimum specifications of state personnel and standards established by the Diagnostic Services Branch Program Manager and approved by the Director of the Division of Prisons.  (c) Procedure for Reviewing a Diagnostic Center. Each center will be reviewed annually based on standards established by the Diagnostic Services Branch Program Manager as approved by the Director of the Division of Prisons.

14 POLICY & PROCEDURES: Diagnostic Centers  (5) Personal Property. Personal property will be obtained, recorded, and processed in a manner consistent with departmental regulations.  (6) Search. A strip search will be conducted and any contraband confiscated and reported as provided in division regulations.  (7) Dress. Inmates will dress in appropriate prison clothing.  (8) Arrival Confirmation. The new admissions arrival will be noted in the electronic record.  (7) Identification. Appropriate measures will be taken to ensure the accurate identification of the inmates. These measures include completion of OR10 and OR11 screens, fingerprints, photographing, and necessary distribution of this data.  (8) Physical Exam. The admitting facility will perform a physical examination of all newly admitted inmates as specified in division regulations.  (b) Orientation. Newly admitted inmates will be assisted by the staff in adjusting to the prison environment. Orientation occurs on a group level and an individual level. An explanation of the rules, penalties, disciplinary procedures, and how to obtain health services will be provided. A description of the inmate's current situation, the diagnostic and classification process, custody levels, and a summary of available programs and work will also be provided.

15 POLICY & PROCEDURES: Diagnostic Centers  (c) Diagnostic. The diagnostic portion of the process involves professional evaluation of the inmate to identify security requirements, crime-related problems, correctional goals, and required correctional intervention. The following will be accomplished:  (1) Psychometric Testing. Psychometric tests approved by the Division of Prisons will be administered, scored, and interpreted.  (2) Social History Data. Relevant background information will be accumulated, recorded, and interpreted and entered into the electronic record in accordance with operational procedures.  (3) Interviewing and Counseling. To obtain pertinent information for effective classification decision making and to assist the individual in making an adequate adjustment to incarceration, interviewing and counseling will be performed by qualified staff.  (4) Psychological and Psychiatric Evaluation. As required either by division regulations or the offender's needs, psychological and psychiatric evaluation will be completed.  (5) Classification Action. The classification action screen(s) IC04, IC05 will be completed and referred to the appropriate classification authority upon completion of the diagnostic procedures. The referral will contain pertinent information to support the recommendations and rationale for housing, custody, work and program assignments.

16 The Future….. Diagnostic Centers will continue to review and revise our policies, procedures and staffing to meet the needs of our growing population and system.

17 EDUCATIONAL SERVICES  ACADEMIC  VOCATIONAL  LIFE SKILLS

18 FEDERAL GRANT PROGRAMS  YOUTH OFFENDER PROGRAM  INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES ACT – IDEA  TITLE I

19 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION  ADULT BASIC EDUCATION  GED  LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY (LEP)

20 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION  LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES – COLLEGE TRANSFER –SHAW UNIVERSITY  NORTH CAROLINA CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION FOR WOMEN  HARNETT CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION –UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYSTEM –NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM

21 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION  HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (HRD)  JOBSTART  LIFE SKILLS

22 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS  BLUE PRINT READING  BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION  CABINET MAKING  CARPENTRY  CDL  CE NURSE HOME AIDE  COMMERCIAL CLEANING

23 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL WIRING  COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS  COMPUTER REPAIR  COMPUTER SOFTWARE & HARDWARE  COSMETOLOGY

24 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  DIGITAL DESIGN  ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS  FACILITY MAINTENANCE  FOOD SERVICE TECHNOLOGY  FURNITURE PRODUCTION  GRAPHIC ARTS & IMAGING  HEATING, A/C AND REFRIGERATION

25 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  HORTICULTURE  INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE  INDUSTRY SEWING  KEYBOARDING  MANICURING/NAIL TECHNOLOGY  MARINE & DIESEL SYSTEMS  MASONRY

26 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  MECHANICAL ENGINEER TECHNOLOGY  OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY  PLUMBING  PRE-EMPLOYMENT TRAINING  SEWING MACHINE REPAIR

27 VOCATIONAL TRAINING  SMALL ENGINE REPAIR  TRAVEL AGENCY  UPHOLSTERY/ RE-UPHOLSTERY  WELDING  45 COMMUNITY COLLEGES INVOLVED AT VARIOUS FACILITIES

28 APPRENTICESHIP GOALS  FOOD SERVICE TECHNOLOGY  MOST CONSTRUCTION TRADES  UPHOLSTERY / RE-UPHOLSTERY

29 APPRENTICESHIP PARTNERS  DEPARTMENT OF LABOR  NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM  DIVISION OF PRISONS FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT  NORTH CAROLINA CORRECTION ENTERPRISES

30 CLOSE CUSTODY FOCUS  EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS SHOULD BE PUT INTO PRACTICE IMMEDIATELY UPON COMPLETION  MOST CLOSE CUSTODY INMATES ARE NOT NEAR THEIR PROJECTED RELEASE DATE AT THE COMPLETION OF AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM  JOB SKILLS THAT PREPARE INMATES FOR JOB ASSIGNMENTS IN CORRECTION ENTERPRISE, INMATE CONSTRUCTION, AND DOP MAINTENANCE

31 OUTCOME GOAL TO PROVIDE INMATES WITH THE RESOURCES FOR MAKING A WORTHWHILE LIFE AND TO BE PRODUCTIVE MEMBERS OF SOCIETY

32 DOP Health Services  Chief, Health Services, Dr. Paula Smith –MH Section Chief, Dr. John Carbone  Psychiatrists  Psychologists  Social Workers  Rehab Therapists –Dental Section Chief, Dr. Larry Ray  Dentists  Dental Assistants  Dental Hygienists –Medical Section Chief, Dr. Abhay Agarwal  Medical Providers –Nursing Section Chief, Regina Alexander, RN  Nurses  CHAs –Support Services Section Chief, Susan Hoy

33 Why and How it Works Now…..  Collaborative  Cooperative  Comprehensive  Interdepartmental  Intradepartmental

34 Clinical Assessment Individual Care Plan Support Services Housing Food Clothing Services Educational/ Vocational Services Substance Abuse Services Medical Services Mental Health Services Transportation Services Employment Services Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Community Service Partners in NC CJ System

35 Service Partners in NC CJ System  NC Dept. of Correction –NC Division of Prisons –NC Division of Community Corrections –NC Division of Alcohol and Chemical Dependency Programs  TASC- Treatment Alternatives to Street Crime  NC Department of Health and Human Services –NC Division of MH/DD/SAS –NC Division of Social Services –NC Council on Developmental Disabilities –NC Mental Health Planning Council  NC Department of Labor –WorkForce Development Board –JobLink Centers  NC Department of Community Colleges  NC Department of Vocational Rehabilitation  Social Security Administration  NC Division of Veteran’s Affairs/US Department of Veteran’s Affairs

36 Where We Came From………….  6,000+ inmates on MH Caseload  2,000+ inmates on DD caseload  25+ year history of MH aftercare  Nursing solely responsible for medical aftercare  Medical for Medical/MH for MH  ADA Unclear  SW functions “cloudy”

37 What We Did and Where We Are…..  MH caseload redefined, re-identified, relocated  DD program mass revision, redefined to meet State and Federal Regulations, relocated  MH Aftercare planning refined and expanded to meet holistic perspective with focus on person in environment

38 Individual Immediate Family Social Family Institutional Family From Carel Germain’s Ecological Systems Perspective of Person in Environment Clinical Assessment Aftercare Planning Model

39 Standard of Care  Every inmate who is identified as a recipient of mental health or developmental disabilities services and those inmates identified as medically needy by definition with release anticipated within 90 days will have a comprehensive, collaborative, cooperative aftercare plan completed and placed in the health service record no later than 30 days prior to the anticipated date of release.

40 What We Did and Where We Are…..  MHSWs acquire responsibility for aftercare planning for medically needy inmates  Health Services collaboration as a team  ADA defined for offenders nationally and SWPD in Health Services designated as DOP ADA Coordinator for inmate and facility issues & facilities designated for specialized housing  MHSW program overhaul with education and experiential requirements for hiring clearly defined, essential job functions and expectations clearly defined

41 What We Did and Where We Are…..  Health Services Aftercare Planning policy, procedures, forms and OPUS screens revised and implemented (MH42,43,44,45; MH57)  Expedited Aftercare Planning:  Parole Commission  Extended Limits of Confinement  Mercy Commutation  Modified Orders for Commitment  Medically Unfit GainTime revisions

42 Where We Are Going.....  Regionalizing &Decentralizing Services  Homeless Sex Offenders  SOAR Expansions  Homeless Veterans  Domestic Violence Offenders  Medical Parole?????  OPUS Enhancements  IP55 Coding to show types of home plans  Program Enhancements

43 The wave of the future; the work continues…

44 Contact Information  Carlton Joyner   Mary Mueller   Rose True   Laura Yates 


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