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1.  One of our Core Democratic Values— (Constitutional Principles)  Refers to “a form of government in which power is divided between the federal (or.

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Presentation on theme: "1.  One of our Core Democratic Values— (Constitutional Principles)  Refers to “a form of government in which power is divided between the federal (or."— Presentation transcript:

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2  One of our Core Democratic Values— (Constitutional Principles)  Refers to “a form of government in which power is divided between the federal (or national) government and the states.”

3  Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists › The Federalists were those who supported the Constitution in its original form (without the amendments) › Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay were the most famous federalists

4  The Anti-Federalists OPPOSED the Constitution for two reasons: › They “felt it gave too much power to the national government and took too much away from the states.” › The original Constitution did not include a bill of rights that would protect “certain individual liberties, such as the freedoms of speech and religion.”

5  Finally the Federalists agreed to include a bill of rights if the Anti-Federalists promised to support adoption of the Constitution.  This eventually lead to the adoption of twenty-seven total amendments that make up the Constitution we know today! QUICK QUIZ! LET’S SEE WHAT YOU LEARNED!

6 Federalists Anti- Federalists

7 The Federalists were those (like James Madison) who supported the Constitution in its original form (without the amendments)

8  The Anti-Federalists OPPOSED the Constitution for two reasons: › They “felt it gave too much power to the national government and took too much away from the states.” › The original Constitution did not include a bill of rights that would protect “certain individual liberties, such as the freedoms of speech and religion.”

9 WHO GETS WHAT POWER?

10 national enumeratedexpressed  Powers given only to the national government are called enumerated (or expressed ) powers.  The national government is the ONLY one who can: Pass all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers ( Necessary and Proper Clause from the Constitution) Pass all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers ( Necessary and Proper Clause from the Constitution) Conduct foreign affairs (e.g. Power to make treaties) Conduct foreign affairs (e.g. Power to make treaties) Raise and support an army (e.g. declare war) Raise and support an army (e.g. declare war) Coin and print money Coin and print money Establish a postal system Establish a postal system Govern U.S. territories, admit new states, and regulate immigration Govern U.S. territories, admit new states, and regulate immigration Regulate trade with other countries and among the states Regulate trade with other countries and among the states

11  Is there a Michigan Dollar?? Or a Texas dollar?  Can Michigan make a peace treaty with Canada?  Can California declare war on Mexico?  Is there a Michigan postal service?  Can Arizona make a trade agreement with Mexico? YES! NO!

12  ONLY THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT HAS THE POWER TO DO THESE THINGS  THESE ARE THE EXPRESSED POWERS! So what powers do state governments have?? Click on Michigan to find out!

13 EXPRESSEDNATIONAL THESE STATES DON’T HAVE THE POWER TO DO ANY OF THESE THINGS BECAUSE EACH OF THESE IS AN EXPRESSED POWER OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT: Pass all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers Conduct foreign affairs (e.g. Power to make treaties) Raise and support an army (e.g. declare war) Coin and print money Establish a postal system Govern U.S. territories, admit new states, and regulate immigration Regulate trade with other countries and among the states TRY AGAIN!

14 states reserved  The powers that are NOT given to the national government are kept by the states, and are called reserved powers.  State governments can: › Make rules for marriage and divorce › Regulate trade WITHIN states › Establish a public school system › Establish local governments › Conduct elections, determine qualifications of voters

15  Requirements for marriage, and divorce, vary by state  State governments determine what classes are necessary to graduate high school  On election night, votes are tallied and announced by each STATE  Who gives you your drivers license?  Who gave me my teaching certificate?  BASICALLY, each state is in charge of handling its own affairs, and the national government only steps in when issues seep outside a states borders. BUT WAIT! WHAT ABOUT SHARING POWER BETWEEN THE TWO???

16 SHARED CONCURRENT  Powers that are SHARED between national and state governments are called CONCURRENT powers.  Both governments can do these things: › Enforce laws › Collect taxes › Establish courts and prisons › Borrow money

17  There are both national laws and state laws we MUST obey  There are federal level law enforcement agencies (e.g. FBI) in addition to state and local authorities (Michigan State Police and Lapeer City Police Department)  Depending on the crime, you might go to federal prison or a state prison  Again, depending on the crime, some trials are held in a federal court, others in local courts  You pay both state and federal income taxes  State governments can borrow money from the national government, and them from other countries QUIZ TIME!

18  ON EACH WORD OR PHRASE, DECIDE WHETHER YOU THINK IT IS REFERRING TO: › EXCLUSIVE POWERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT › EXCLUSIVE POWERS OF STATE GOVERNMENTS › POWERS SHARED BY BOTH HERE WE GO!

19 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

20  COLLECTING TAXES IS A CONCURRENT POWER  WE PAY BOTH FEDERAL AND STATE INCOME TAX

21  STATES CAN COLLECT TAXES TOO! JUST LOOK AT YOUR PAYCHECK!

22  THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CAN COLLECT TAXES TOO! JUST LOOK AT YOUR PAYCHECK!

23 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

24  STATES ARE IN CHARGE OF SETTING UP SCHOOLS AND DETERMINING WHAT IS REQUIRED OF STUDENTS

25  THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DOESN’T ESTABLISH OUR SCHOOLS…STATES DO!

26 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

27  EXPRESSED POWERS REFERS TO POWERS ONLY GIVEN TO THE NATIONAL (OR FEDERAL) GOVERNMENT

28  DOUBLE CHECK YOUR VOCABULARY: › Powers given only to the national government are called enumerated (or expressed ) powers.

29 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

30  INDIVIDUAL STATES ARE IN CHARGE OF REGULATING WHAT GOES ON WITHIN THEIR BORDERS

31  THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DOES NOT STEP IN

32 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

33  FOR EXAMPLE, MICHIGAN HAS DIFFERENT LAWS ABOUT DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS AND RULES THAN ILLINOIS DOES

34  THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DOESN’T GET INVOLVED IN MARRIAGE OR DIVORCE ISSUES. EACH STATE HAS ITS OWN RULES

35 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

36  YOU REMEMBERED THAT MICHIGAN IS NOT GOING TO MAKE A TREATY WITH CANADA ON ITS OWN! THAT’S UP TO THE AUTHORITY OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

37  HAVE YOU ALREADY FORGOTTEN?? MICHIGAN IS NOT GOING TO MAKE A TREATY WITH CANADA ON ITS OWN! THAT’S UP TO THE AUTHORITY OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ONLY!

38 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

39  AS CITIZENS WE MUST FOLLOW BOTH STATE AND NATIONAL LAWS. FOR THOSE WHO DON’T OBEY THESE LAWS, THERE ARE FEDERAL LEVEL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES (e.g. FBI) IN ADDITION TO STATE AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES (Michigan State Police and Lapeer City Police Department)

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41 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

42  State governments can borrow money from the national government, and the national government from other countries

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44 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

45 SHARED CONCURRENT  Powers that are SHARED between national and state governments are called CONCURRENT powers.

46  WE MAY NEED TO WORK ON YOUR VOCABULARY: SHARED CONCURRENT › Powers that are SHARED between national and state governments are called CONCURRENT powers.

47 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

48  YOU REMEMBERED!! › ONLY THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT HAS THE POWER TO COIN MONEY › MICHIGAN DOESN’T HAVE IT’S OWN CURRENCY

49 › ONLY THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT HAS THE POWER TO COIN MONEY › MICHIGAN DOESN’T HAVE IT’S OWN CURRENCY

50 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

51  YOU REMEMBERED! states reserved › The powers that are NOT given to the national government are kept by the states, and are called reserved powers.

52  LET’S WORK ON THAT VOCABULARY! states reserved › The powers that are NOT given to the national government are kept by the states, and are called reserved powers. › When you RESERVE something, you hold it for something else. The national government is reserving certain powers for the states to have to create the balance that is FEDERALISM!

53 EXCLUSIVE TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT EXCLUSIVE TO STATE GOVERNMENTS POWERS SHARED BY BOTH

54  Depending on the crime, you might go to federal prison or a state prison BUT IF YOU DO THE CRIME YOU WILL DO THE TIME…SOMEWHERE!!!

55  Depending on the crime, you might go to federal prison or a state prison BUT IF YOU DO THE CRIME YOU WILL DO THE TIME…SOMEWHERE!!!

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