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Lessons from the Ancients Obedience. AD 250 Northern Africa My dear brother Cyprian...

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Presentation on theme: "Lessons from the Ancients Obedience. AD 250 Northern Africa My dear brother Cyprian..."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lessons from the Ancients Obedience

2 AD 250 Northern Africa My dear brother Cyprian...

3 Romans 12:2  Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.

4 Why Study the Early Church?

5 1. Direct Link to the Apostlic Church

6 Why Study the Early Church? 1. Direct Link to the Apostlic Church 2. They Changed the world

7 Why Study the Early Church? 1. Direct Link to the Apostlic Church 2. They Changed the world 3. Provides a primary source

8 Why Study the Early Church? 1. Direct Link to the Apostlic Church 2. They Changed the world 3. Provides a primary source 4. We can learn from their example

9 Why Study the Early Church? 1. Direct Link to the Apostlic Church 2. They Changed the world 3. Provides a primary source 4. We can learn from their example 5. Similar circumstances

10 Warnings  They didn’t write about everything  We have to be wary of cultural differences  They are not a source of doctrine, only a verification  They made mistakes  There are different ways to do things biblically than how they did them  We can become obsessed

11 Obedience  Jesus replied, “Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. Anyone who does not love me will not obey my teaching. These words you hear are not my own; they belong to the Father who sent me. John 14:23-24

12 Obedience  Jesus replied, “Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. Anyone who does not love me will not obey my teaching. These words you hear are not my own; they belong to the Father who sent me. John 14:23-24

13 Entertainment

14 Tatain, c. AD 160  They utter ribaldry in pretentious tones, and they act out indecent movement. Your daughters and your sons watch them giving lessons in adultery on the stage... And the boxers meet in single combat, for no reason whatever... Are such exhibitions to your credit?... He who misses the murderous exhibition is grieved for he was not doomed to be a spectator of wicked, impious, and abominable deeds!

15 Clement of Alexandria, c. AD 195  The Instructor [the Holy Spirit] will not, then, bring us to public spectacles [the theater]. Not inappropriately, one might call the racecourse and the theater “the seat of plagues.”... Let spectacles, therefore, and plays that are full of indecent language and abundant gossip, be forbidden. For what base action is there that is not exhibited in the theaters?

16 Tertullian, c. AD 197  We renounce all you spectacles... Among us nothing is ever said, seen, or heard that has anything in common with the madness of the circus [chariot races], the immodesty of the theater, the atrocities of the arena, or the useless exercise of the wrestling ground. Why do you take offense at us because we differ from you in regard to your pleasures?

17 Tertullian, c. AD 197  Are we not, in like manner. Commanded to put away from us all immodesty? On this ground, again, we are excluded from the theater, which is immodesty’s own peculiar abode. The very harlots, too, victims of the public lust, are brought upon the stage... Is it right to look on what is disgraceful to do? How is it that the things that defile a man in going out of his mouth, are not regarded as doing so when they go in his eyes and ears?

18 Tertullian, c. AD 197  The father who carefully protects and guards his virgin daughter’s ears from every polluting word, takes her to the theater himself—exposing her to all its vile words and attitudes. Again, in the streets, a man will either apprehend or scold a brawling fighter. However, in the arena, the same man gives complete encouragement to combats of a much more serious kind.

19 Tertullian, c. AD 197  Does is then remain for us to appeal to the pagans themselves? Let them tell us whether it is right for Christians to frequent the shows. Why, the rejection of these amusements is the chief sign to them that a man has adopted the Christian faith.  Seated where there is nothing of God, will one be thinking of his Maker? Will there be peace in his soul when there is eager strife there for a charioteer?... When the athletes are hard at struggle, will he be ready to proclaim that there must be no striking back?

20 Commodianus, c. AD 240  You are going to vain shows with the crowd of the evil one, where Satan is at work in the circus with din. You persuade yourself that everything that pleases you is lawful. You are the offspring of the highest; yet you mingle with the sons of the devil!... Love not the world, nor the things in it!

21 Tertullian, c. AD 195  In us, all ardor in the pursuit of glory and honor is dead. So we have no pressing inducement to take part in your[politics]. Nor is there anything more entirely foreign to us than affairs of state.

22 Early Christians and Politics Tertullian would go on to make the point that Christians could only partake in politics if they could somehow manage to take no part in supporting or participating in things like: - Supporting other religions - Taking part in holidays of other religions - Makes no public support of other religions or pagan festivals - Does not participate in any activity or judgment that might cost someone their life - Does not condemn anyone to punishment - Does not put anyone in prison or subject them to torture - Does not connect themselves in any way with any position that would stand opposed to the purposes of God and his Kingdom

23 Origen, c. AD 248  Celsus [a critic of Christians] also urges us to “take office in the government of the country, if that is necessary for the maintenance of the laws and the support of religion.” However, we recognize in each state the existence of another national organization that was founded by the Word of God. And we exhort those who are mighty in word and of blameless life to rule over churches... It is not for the purpose of escaping public duties that Christians decline public offices. Rather, it is so they may reserve themselves for a more divine and necessary service in the church of God—for the salvation of men.

24 Obedience

25 Clement of Rome, c. AD 96 (Philippians 4:3)  We are justified by our works, not our words.

26 Ignatius, c. AD 105  The tree is made manifest by its fruit. So those who profess themselves to be Christians will be recognized by their conduct... It is better for a man to be silent and be [a Christian], than to talk and not be one.

27 Irenaeus, c. AD 180  To believe in Him is to do His will

28 Marcus Minucius Felix  We don’t speak great things, we live them.


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