Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Entrusted To Our Care Adult Volunteer Training How to Protect Our Children and Vulnerable Adults From Abuse.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Entrusted To Our Care Adult Volunteer Training How to Protect Our Children and Vulnerable Adults From Abuse."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Entrusted To Our Care Adult Volunteer Training How to Protect Our Children and Vulnerable Adults From Abuse

3 Let Us Pray

4 Preventing Sexual Abuse The Catholic Diocese of Spokane is committed to providing a safe environment for all children and vulnerable adults in our care. In order to effectively facilitate this safe environment, all personnel and volunteers are required to undergo Sexual Abuse Prevention Training and to become familiar with our Diocesan Code of Conduct.

5 Preventing Sexual Abuse The Diocese is also committed to providing a Personal Safety education program to all children attending our Catholic schools and religious education programs and ongoing sexual abuse prevention training for all of their parents/guardians. The Diocese is also committed to providing a Personal Safety education program to all children attending our Catholic schools and religious education programs and ongoing sexual abuse prevention training for all of their parents/guardians.

6 Training Outcomes Participants will: Identify signs and symptoms of abuse Identify signs and symptoms of abuse Describe sexual predator characteristics Describe sexual predator characteristics Describe how to properly respond to disclosure Describe how to properly respond to disclosure Describe the reporting process Describe the reporting process Have a basic understanding of the Diocesan Administrative Policy for Responding to Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Inappropriate Behavior By Church Personnel Have a basic understanding of the Diocesan Administrative Policy for Responding to Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Inappropriate Behavior By Church Personnel Have a basic understanding of the Diocesan Code of Conduct. Have a basic understanding of the Diocesan Code of Conduct.

7 Boundary Violations

8 Sexual abuse is a serious boundary violation!!!

9 DEFINITION OF A BOUNDARY Boundaries are limits that allow for a safe that allow for a safe connection based on need.

10 What is child sexual abuse? Child sexual abuse is the use of a child for sexual purposes by an adult or older, more powerful person, including an older child. Child sexual abuse is called incest when it happens between family members.

11 There are many forms of sexual abuse that do not involve touching the child: Asking a child to touch someone else’s private parts Asking a child to touch someone else’s private parts Exposing oneself to a child Exposing oneself to a child Making obscene phone calls to a child Making obscene phone calls to a child Taking photographs of a child for sexual purposes Taking photographs of a child for sexual purposes Communicating with a child in a sexual way via or the Internet Communicating with a child in a sexual way via or the Internet Showing a child sexually explicit materials or making a child watch others engaged in sexual acts Showing a child sexually explicit materials or making a child watch others engaged in sexual acts

12 Child Pornography: Washington State Law A person is guilty of sexual exploitation of a minor if the person: (a) Compels a minor by threat or force to engage in sexually explicit conduct, knowing that such conduct will be photographed or part of a live performance; (b) Aids, invites, employs, authorizes, or causes a minor to engage in sexually explicit conduct, knowing that such conduct will be photographed or part of a live performance; (c) Being a parent, legal guardian, or person having custody or control of a minor, permits the minor to engage in sexually explicit conduct, knowing that the conduct will be photographed or part of a live performance.

13 Child Pornography: Washington State Law A person commits the crime of dealing in depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct in the first degree when he or she: Knowingly develops, duplicates, publishes, prints, disseminates, exchanges, finances, attempts to finance, or sells a visual or printed matter that depicts a minor engaged in an act of sexually explicit conduct. Possesses with intent to develop, duplicate, publish, print, disseminate, exchange, or sell any visual or printed matter that depicts a minor engaged in an act of sexually explicit conduct.

14 Child Pornography: Washington State Law A person commits the crime of sending or bringing into the state depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct in the first degree when he or she knowingly sends or causes to be sent, or brings or causes to be brought, into this state for sale or distribution, a visual or printed matter that depicts a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct. For the purposes of determining the unit of prosecution under this subsection, each depiction or image of visual or printed matter constitutes a separate offense.

15 Child Pornography: Washington State Law A person commits the crime of possession of depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct in the first degree when he or she knowingly possesses a visual or printed matter depicting a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct. For the purposes of determining the unit of prosecution under this subsection, each depiction or image of visual or printed matter constitutes a separate offense

16 Child Pornography: Washington State Law A person who intentionally views over the internet visual or printed matter depicting a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct is guilty of viewing depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct in the first degree, a class B felony punishable under chapter 9A.20 RCW.9A.20

17 Reporting A person who, in the course of processing or producing visual or printed matter either privately or commercially, has reasonable cause to believe that the visual or printed matter submitted for processing or producing depicts a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct shall immediately report such incident, or cause a report to be made, to the proper law enforcement agency. Persons failing to do so are guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

18 Reporting If, in the course of repairing, modifying, or maintaining a computer that has been submitted either privately or commercially for repair, modification, or maintenance, a person has reasonable cause to believe that the computer stores visual or printed matter that depicts a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct, the person performing the repair, modification, or maintenance may report such incident, or cause a report to be made, to the proper law enforcement agency. A person who makes a report in good faith under this section is immune from civil liability resulting from the report.

19 COMMON FACTS ABOUT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE Boys, as well as girls are at risk. Victims can be of any age. Young children are especially at risk. Incest and sexual assault are problems in all socio- economic classes. Sexual abuse crosses racial, educational and religious beliefs. Children very rarely make up stories about sexual abuse. Offenders often blame the victim for provoking the sexual assault. The offender, not the victim, is at fault for violating the rights of another person.

20 Who is a Vulnerable Adult? A vulnerable adult is defined by law in Washington State as: a person 60 years of age or older who lacks the functional, physical, or mental ability to care for him or herself; a person 60 years of age or older who lacks the functional, physical, or mental ability to care for him or herself; an adult with a developmental disability per 71A ; an adult with a developmental disability per 71A ;71A an adult with a legal guardian per an adult with a legal guardian per RCW; RCW;11.88 RCW11.88 RCW an adult living in a long-term care an adult living in a long-term care facility (an adult family home, boarding facility (an adult family home, boarding home or nursing home); home or nursing home); an adult living in their own or family’s home receiving services from an agency or contracted individual provider; or an adult living in their own or family’s home receiving services from an agency or contracted individual provider; or an adult self-directing their care per law ( RCW) an adult self-directing their care per law ( RCW) RCW RCW

21 Abuse/Mistreatment of a Vulnerable Adult Defined Definitions in state law vary considerably from state to state in terms of what constitutes abuse, neglect, or exploitation of a vulnerable adult. Researchers also have used varying definitions to describe and study the problem. Broadly defined, however, there are three basic categories of abuse: Domestic abuse Institutional abuse Self-neglect or self-abuse While state definitions may vary, in most states, definitions of abuse of a vulnerable adult generally fall within these three categories.

22 Domestic Abuse Domestic abuse generally refers to any of several forms of maltreatment of a vulnerable adult by someone who has a special relationship with the person (a spouse, a sibling, a child, a friend, or a caregiver), that occur in the vulnerable adult’s home, or in the home of a caregiver.

23 Institutional Abuse Institutional abuse, on the other hand, generally refers to abuse that occurs in residential facilities for these persons (e.g., nursing homes, foster homes, group homes, board and care facilities). Perpetrators of institutional abuse usually are persons who have a legal or contractual obligation to provide the victims with care and protection (e.g., paid caregivers, staff, professionals).

24 Self-Neglect or Self-Abuse Self-neglect is characterized as the behavior of a vulnerable adult that threatens his/her own health or safety. Self-neglect generally manifests itself in the person as a refusal or failure to provide himself/herself with adequate food, water, clothing, shelter, personal hygiene, medication (when indicated), and safety precautions.

25 Child Sexual Abuse

26 WHAT WE FEAR  A dangerous weird stranger.  Isolated incident.  Out of the blue.  Rare and extreme.  A violent attack.  A person they know, a relative or friend of the family, is more often the offender (85% of the cases).  Over and over again.  A situation that develops over a period of time.  Frequent incidents. There are many forms of sexual assault.  Subtle, rather than extreme force. WHAT IS MORE LIKELY TO HAPPEN

27 There’s a New Stranger Danger! Many predators are now scanning personal social network sites (e.g. My Space, Facebook) to find their next victims. Young adolescents can be easy prey to these very devious predators.

28 SEXUAL PREDATOR CHARACTERISTICS BE AWARE:  of family patterns: many times child abuse in families is inter-generational. The abused becomes the abuser.  of why an individual wants to work with children; many abusers want to work with children because they are sweet, innocent or non-judgmental. Many times the child-focused adult wants to work with children to fulfill his need for love, affection and control.  of the individual who spends most of his leisure time participating in child activities or spends all free time with children.

29  of the individual who has a preference or reservations about working with a particular age group. Many times sexual abusers have preference for a particular aged child. Some have a preference for a certain gender, physical trait, personality characteristics.  of an individual who has a need to control. Listen carefully to the individual and note signs that the individual may use psychological abuse to discipline.  inappropriate behaviors which demonstrate a lack of respect for children and adult’s feelings and thoughts.

30  of the individual who advocates keeping secrets. Individuals should be aware of the difference between secrets and surprises.  of the individual who is too anxious, too charming, too perfect and too good to be true. They probably are. Information adapted from the YMCA Abuse Training

31 Common Grooming Techniques The sexual abuser: Begins the grooming process with a trust- building period. Begins the grooming process with a trust- building period. Gains the friendship of a child Gains the friendship of a child Slowly breaks down the victim’s guard against inappropriate touching and sexual contact Slowly breaks down the victim’s guard against inappropriate touching and sexual contact May threaten the victim in order to keep “the secret” May threaten the victim in order to keep “the secret” Seeks out potential victims who have low self- esteem Seeks out potential victims who have low self- esteem Gains the trust of the victim’s parent(s) Gains the trust of the victim’s parent(s) Invites the victim on overnights and gives the victim gifts Invites the victim on overnights and gives the victim gifts

32 “This is our secret!” It is very important for the predator to keep the child from telling! As a result, the child is often threatened: “If you tell, no one will believe you and you will be in serious trouble!” “If you tell, I will kill you!”

33 SIGNS OF SEXUAL ABUSE Consider the possibility of sexual abuse when the child:  Has difficulty walking or sitting  Suddenly refuses to change for gym or to participate in physical activities  Demonstrates bizarre, sophisticated, or unusual sexual knowledge or behavior.  Becomes pregnant or contracts an STD, particularly if under age of 14  Runs away, or  Reports sexual abuse by a parent or another adult caregiver

34 THE CHILD  Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance  Has learning problems that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes  Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen  Lacks adult supervision  Is overly compliant, an overachiever, or too responsible  Comes to school early, stays late, and does not want to go home

35 THE CHILD may… Exhibit Signs of Stress Exhibit Signs of Stress Experience Insomnia Experience Insomnia Experience Depression Experience Depression Exhibit Seductive Behavior Exhibit Seductive Behavior Become Passive or Withdrawn Become Passive or Withdrawn Make References to an Adult Friend Make References to an Adult Friend

36 SIGNS OF SEXUAL ABUSE Consider the possibility of sexual abuse when the parent or caregiver:  Is unduly protective of the child, severely limits the child's contact with other children, especially of the opposite sex  Is secretive and isolated, or  Describes marital difficulties involving family power struggles or sexual relations

37 FAMILY INDICATORS  Extreme paternal dominance and restrictiveness  Family isolated from community and support systems emotionally and/or physically  Lack of boundaries  Marked role reversal between mother and child  History of above for either parent

38 SPECIAL VULNERABILITY “Let’s be special friends” Appeals to: Lonely Child Troubled Child

39 SOCIALIZATION  “Be polite” Sometimes it may be OK not to be polite.  “Don’t tattle” Sometimes you must tell.  “Mind the baby-sitter” Sometimes baby-sitters are abusers.

40 Abuse of Vulnerable Adults Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Emotional Abuse Abandonment Financial Exploitation Self-Neglect

41 Signs and Symptoms of Physical Abuse bruises, black eyes, welts, lacerations, and rope marks; bone fractures, broken bones, and skull fractures; open wounds, cuts, punctures, untreated injuries in various stages of healing; sprains, dislocations, and internal injuries/bleeding;

42 Signs and Symptoms of Physical Abuse broken eyeglasses/frames, physical signs of being subjected to punishment, and signs of being restrained; laboratory findings of medication overdose or under utilization of prescribed drugs; an vulnerable adult’s report of being hit, slapped, kicked, or mistreated; sudden changes in behavior; and the caregiver's refusal to allow visitors to see the vulnerable adult alone.

43 Signs and Symptoms of Sexual Abuse bruises around the breasts or genital area; unexplained venereal disease or genital infections; unexplained vaginal or anal bleeding; torn, stained, or bloody underclothing; and an vulnerable adult’s report of being sexually assaulted or raped.

44 Signs and Symptoms of Emotional or Psychological Abuse being emotionally upset or agitated; being extremely withdrawn and non communicative or non responsive; unusual behavior usually attributed to dementia (e.g., sucking, biting, rocking); and A vulnerable adult’s report of being verbally or emotionally mistreated.

45 Signs and Symptoms of Abandonment the desertion of a vulnerable adult at a hospital, a nursing facility, or other similar institution; the desertion of a vulnerable adult at a shopping center or other public location; and A vulnerable adult’s own report of being abandoned.

46 Signs and Symptoms of Financial or Material Exploitation sudden changes in bank account or banking practice, including an unexplained withdrawal of large sums of money by a person accompanying the vulnerable adult; the inclusion of additional names on the vulnerable adult's bank signature card; unauthorized withdrawal of the vulnerable adult's funds using the vulnerable adult’s ATM card; abrupt changes in a will or other financial documents; unexplained disappearance of funds or valuable possessions;

47 Signs and Symptoms of Financial or Material Exploitation substandard care being provided or bills unpaid despite the availability of adequate financial resources; discovery of the vulnerable adult’s signature being forged for financial transactions or for the titles of his/her possessions; sudden appearance of previously uninvolved relatives claiming their rights to the vulnerable adult's affairs and possessions; unexplained sudden transfer of assets to a family member or someone outside the family; the provision of services that are not necessary; and a vulnerable adult's report of financial exploitation.

48 Signs and Symptoms of Self- Neglect dehydration, malnutrition, untreated or improperly attended medical conditions, and poor personal hygiene; hazardous or unsafe living conditions/arrangements (e.g., improper wiring, no indoor plumbing, no heat, no running water); unsanitary or unclean living quarters (e.g., animal/insect infestation, no functioning toilet, fecal/urine smell); inappropriate and/or inadequate clothing, lack of the necessary medical aids (e.g., eyeglasses, hearing aids, dentures); and grossly inadequate housing or homelessness.

49 IGNORANCE A general lack of information and knowledge regarding the abuse of children and vulnerable adults increases the risk of abuse and provides opportunity for the predator.

50 Education is the Key! Children who have had Personal Safety education are more likely to report that they are being sexually abused.

51 Education is the Key! Adults who have been trained about abuse can be the eyes and ears within our communities that will be sensitive to the possible abuse of our children and vulnerable adults and, as a result, will make our communities safer for all.

52 “THE BIG THREE” SYMPTOMS of child sexual abuse 1.Knowledge that is too sophisticated for age group 2.Sexual behavior with peers or adults 3.Statement from child (Direct Disclosure)

53 SYMPTOMS Any Clusters of Behaviors/Symptoms may be a warning signal. CAUTION

54 SOME CHILD ABUSE VICTIMS SHOW NO SIGNS, SYMPTOMS OR BEHAVIORS

55 Child Abuse Victims may… Experience periodic flashbacks of the abuse Experience periodic flashbacks of the abuse Develop extreme anger towards those who did not prevent or stop the abuse Develop extreme anger towards those who did not prevent or stop the abuse Engage in self-mutilation Engage in self-mutilation Experience difficulty with trust Experience difficulty with trust Develop overwhelming feelings of guilt Develop overwhelming feelings of guilt Experience mood swings, behavioral episodes, and intense anger Experience mood swings, behavioral episodes, and intense anger

56 LONG-TERM EFFECTS  Low self-esteem  Guilt and shame  Depression  Difficulty in trusting relationships  Loneliness  Destructive acting-out  Drug and alcohol abuse  Eating disorders  Sexual dysfunction  Difficulty in parenting  Confused family relations  Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

57 Responding to Disclosure Regarding Child Abuse Remain Calm Remain Calm Reassure the child by saying: I’m glad you told me. It’s not your fault. I am always here for you. Reassure the child by saying: I’m glad you told me. It’s not your fault. I am always here for you. Report the disclosure to your supervisor, CPS, and law enforcement. Report the disclosure to your supervisor, CPS, and law enforcement. Do NOT question the child or attempt to investigate Do NOT question the child or attempt to investigate

58 SCHOOL PERSONNEL & WASHINGTON STATE LAW  “Reasonable cause” to suspect abuse or neglect  Civil immunity for good faith reporting  Failure to report = gross misdemeanor charge

59

60 CONTACT Child Protective Services (CPS) and Child Protective Services (CPS) and Law Enforcement Law Enforcement

61 At the Time of the Report record… The day and time of your report The day and time of your report The name of the person who took your report The name of the person who took your report The report/case number The report/case number An exact narrative of what was reported An exact narrative of what was reported

62 MAKING A REPORT  MAKE WITHIN 24 HOURS  TELEPHONE EARLY IN THE DAY  CONTACT THE FAMILY DO NOT

63 Adult Protective Services Adult Protective Services (APS) is the principal public agency responsible both for investigating reported cases of vulnerable adult abuse and for providing victims with treatment and protective services. Although most APS agencies also handle adult abuse cases (serving clients between 18 and 59 years of age), nearly 70 percent of their caseloads involve elder abuse.

64 Reporting Abuse As soon as you have reason to believe that abuse is occurring, call for help. You do not need absolute proof to report suspected abuse or to give your name. Remember, law enforcement and social service agencies cannot be everywhere. It takes all of us to help make sure that those who need protection are safe.

65 Reporting Abuse To report abuse or neglect of a vulnerable adult or a child in Washington State, call the DSHS toll-free EndHarm hotline anytime day or night at ENDHARM is TTY accessible. When you call, you will speak with a real person, who will connect you to the direct, local number to make your report.

66 Reporting Abuse You can also call the Complaint Resolution Unit toll-free hotline at if the person that you suspect is being abused or neglected is living in a nursing home, boarding home, or adult family home. If it's an emergency and the person is in immediate danger, call the police.

67 When you call… You will be asked to give the person’s name, address, contact information and details about why you are concerned. You will also be asked for your name and number or some way of contacting you if the investigator has follow up questions. Unless there is a court action, law enforcement has been called in, or you agree, your identity is confidential. If you report in good faith, you cannot be held liable for any damages resulting from reporting.

68 Discussion Questions: What is your initial response to this brief overview? What is your initial response to this brief overview? What are some red flags that might alert you to possible abuse? What are some red flags that might alert you to possible abuse? What are the key things to remember if a child or vulnerable adult discloses a potential abuse or neglect situation? What are the key things to remember if a child or vulnerable adult discloses a potential abuse or neglect situation? What other questions do you have regarding the abuse of children or vulnerable adults? What other questions do you have regarding the abuse of children or vulnerable adults?

69 BREAK

70 The Diocesan Administrative Policy for Responding to Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Inappropriate Behavior By Church Personnel can be found on the diocesan website.

71 Protecting Our Children

72 The Diocesan Administrative Policy for Responding to Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Inappropriate Behavior By Church Personnel I. Preamble II. Diocesan Review Board III. Procedures to be followed in Cases of Sexual Abuse of a Minor or Vulnerable Adult Involving Church Personnel IV. Procedures for Other Instances of Abuse or Inappropriate Behavior V. Reporting Suspected Abuse VI. Requirements for Education on Issues of Abuse VII. Background Checks for New Employees and Volunteers VIII. Background Checks for Ministerial Candidates IX. Code of Conduct

73 Code of Conduct The Diocesan Code of Conduct is contained within the Diocesan Administrative Policy for Responding to Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Inappropriate Behavior By Church Personnel. Read it and Sign it!

74 Code of Conduct Touching Touching Verbal and Nonverbal Communication Verbal and Nonverbal Communication Transportation and Outings Transportation and Outings Relationships Relationships Drugs and Alcohol Drugs and Alcohol Environment Environment

75 VIDEO Entrusted to Our Care The Diocesan Code of Conduct

76 Discussion Questions Why is it important for the Diocese to have a Code of Conduct? Why is it important for the Diocese to have a Code of Conduct? What challenges do you believe the Code of Conduct poses for you in your role? What challenges do you believe the Code of Conduct poses for you in your role? What questions do you have regarding the Code of Conduct? What questions do you have regarding the Code of Conduct?

77 Before you leave… Have you completed and signed a Background check permission form? Have you completed and signed a Background check permission form? Have you completed and signed a disclosure statement? Have you completed and signed a disclosure statement? Have you read and signed a Diocesan Code of Conduct form? Have you read and signed a Diocesan Code of Conduct form? Have you signed the training roster? Have you signed the training roster?

78 ETS System All clergy, employees and volunteers who have participated in the FULL safe environment training for adults are required to take an annual on-line update and renewal test. Individuals who have not participated in the initial training will not be permitted to participate in the on- line update and renewal.

79 The ANNUAL online update and renewal MUST take place between July 1 st and November 1st

80 CLOSING PRAYER!


Download ppt "Entrusted To Our Care Adult Volunteer Training How to Protect Our Children and Vulnerable Adults From Abuse."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google