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Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of.

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Presentation on theme: "Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of Public Instruction Early Childhood Special Education Cross-System Collaboration 1

2 Who’s Facilitating Today? Ruth Chvojicek – Statewide Part B Child Outcomes Coordinator Dana Romary – State Birth-to-3 Program Program & Policy Specialist Elizabeth Wahl – Birth-to-3 Program Professional Development Specialist 2

3 Raise your hand if: You are new in your position and new to child outcomes work… You are not new in your position but new to child outcomes work… You haven’t participated in a child outcomes professional development in many years (4 years ago or more)… You have participated in a child outcomes or indicator professional development in the last two years… 3

4 Today’s Objectives Participants will know and be able to: 1. State the purpose of Part C Indicator 3 / Part B Indicator7; 2. Demonstrate an understanding of typical child development within the context of the three Child Outcomes; 3. Utilize functional assessment practices in the Child Outcomes rating process; 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the 7-point rating framework; 5. Apply the Child Outcomes rating process with fidelity to accurately rate a child; 6. Analyze current rating patterns for accuracy; 7. Appraise current IFSP or IEP process to identify areas for possible improvement in obtaining quality Child Outcome data. 4

5 Do you have something to ask or a resource to share? Put it on the backchannel… 5

6 Housekeeping Post your questions on TodaysMeet Use breaks and lunch to respond to email and phone Discussion time built into the day 6

7 Integrating Child Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process 7

8 Action Planning Guide 8

9 Next Steps - Fidelity 9

10 Section One: Purpose of the Indicator Objective One : State the purpose of Indicator 3/7 10

11 ECO Goal Statement “…To enable young children to be active and successful participants during the early childhood years and in the future in a variety of settings – in their homes with their families, in child care, in preschool or school programs, and in the community.” (from Early Childhood Outcomes Center, 11

12 Table Discussion What does active participation look like in typically developing children? 12

13 A Paradigm Shift… We are “thinking about children differently ” Comparison of child to typical development – NOT individual progress of child Focus on everyday “global” functional behavior – NOT discreet skills Integrated behavior – NOT behavior described in domains or “silos” 13

14 Value of Child Outcomes Data Federal government is driving force behind child outcomes data collection But there are many reasons to collect and use the child outcomes: –Examine program effectiveness –Use data for program improvement –Ultimately, to better serve children and families 14

15 Program Evaluation The percent of preschool children with IFSPs or IEPs who demonstrate improved – Positive social emotional skills – Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills, and – Appropriate action to meet needs. 15

16 Data Sent to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in the Annual Performance Report (APR) Summary Statement One – The % of Children Who Substantially Increased Their Rate of Growth By The Time They Exited The Program Summary Statement Two – The % of Children Who Were Functioning Within Age-Expectations By The Time They Exited the Program Outcome One – Positive Social Emotional Skills 56.1%62.3% Outcome Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills 62.3%45.9% Outcome Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs 66.9%64.5% 16

17 Section Two: The Three Outcomes Objective Two: Demonstrate an understanding of typical child development within the context of the three Child Outcomes 17

18 The Three Outcomes

19 Step by Step Video 19

20 Table Discussion 20

21 Louie 21

22 Austin & Sander 22

23 Alecia 23

24 Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Because of this, Ed’s parents have enrolled him in the district’s four-year old kindergarten program (4K). Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. 24

25 Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Because of this, Ed’s parents have enrolled him in the district’s four-year old kindergarten program (4K). Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. 25

26 One – Social Emotional Skills Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. 26

27 Practice - Directions On your table is a sample narrative of a child’s summary of development. Using the hand highlighters provided, decide which behaviors fall into each of the three outcomes. Highlight the behaviors in a different color for each of the three outcome areas. 27

28 Activity – Practice Answer 28

29 Timer 29

30 Section Three: Functional Assessment Objective Three: Utilize functional assessment practices in the Child Outcomes rating process 30

31 Table Discussion What comes to mind when you hear the word assessment? 31

32 DEC Recommended Practices - Assessment Revised 2014 At your tables review the 11 recommended practices What practices are you carrying out well? What practices are more challenging for you? 32 http://www.dec-sped.org/recommendedpractices

33 What is Functional Assessment? Assessment of the young child’s skills in the real life contexts of family, culture and community rather than discrete isolated tasks irrelevant to daily life 33 “the science of the strange behavior of children, with strange adults, in strange settings for the briefest possible period of time.” Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

34 Functional Assessment Our Focus Shifts FromTo Knows how to make eye contact, smile, and give a hug Initiates affection toward caregivers and respond to others’ affection Knows how to imitate a gesture when prompted by others Watches what a peer says or does and incorporate it into his/her own play Uses finger in pointing motion Points to indicate needs or wants Shows a skill in a specific situation Uses a skill in actions across settings and situations to accomplish something meaningful to the child 34

35 Who performs Functional Assessment? Families and familiar, knowledgeable caregivers in the child’s life Providers Teachers Others, less familiar, can also contribute 35

36 W hen is Functional Assessment performed? Over Time “One-time observations even in the natural context, are insufficient and often misleading.” 36 Bagnato, S.J., Neisworth, J.T., & Pretti-Frontczak, K. Linking Authentic Assessment and Early Childhood Intervention - Best Measures for Best Practices, Second Edition. Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, MD. 2010.

37 How is Functional Assessment performed? Knowing the purpose for the assessment is important Observation is essential: –Keep a focus on being objective vs. subjective Record keeping is key: –Qualitative –Quantitative Hearing from others who know the child is critical – involve families! 37

38 Where is Functional Assessment performed? Only in the children’s natural everyday settings, activities, and routines 38

39 A Functional Assessment Conversation As you listen to this brief conversation, the right side of the room will listen for the types of questions being asked that provide information on each of the three outcome areas. What types of questions did you find helpful in gathering information about the child’s functioning in the three outcome areas? 39

40 A Functional Assessment Conversation The left side of the room will listen for information about the child’s functional development. What types of things did you learn about the child in outcome 1-2-3? 40

41 Practice Discussion Form groups of three - select a parent, caregiver and observer. Have a conversation to gather information on the child’s functioning in the three outcomes. Use “Discussion Prompts” handout for ideas of questions. Observers record what you hear about the child’s functioning in the three outcomes. 41

42 Reflecting on Your Discussions For the caregivers: What did it feel like for you to have this conversation? For the interviewer: What was this experience like for you? What did you learn about the process of asking questions? For the observers: Did you get information about the child’s functioning in the three outcomes? Did you get enough information? 42

43 Team Discussion Working in your county or district team, think about your assessment process “back home”. – How is a functional assessment conversation the same or different from your current assessment practices to gather information on a child’s functional behavior? – Who is gathering information on a child’s everyday functioning? – How is it gathered and documented? – When is it done? – How is it shared with others on your team? – How are all team members, including OT/PT and other therapists included in this discussion? – How do you document the child’s functioning in an ongoing way to track child’s progress AND to inform ratings? – How do your practices compare to the 11 DEC Recommended Practices on Assessment? Record your ideas for possible enhancement of your program practices on your Action Planning Guide 43

44 44

45 45 Assessment Tools “Age-Anchoring” Assessment tools provide information on the age level a child is functioning for each of the three outcome areas. Limitations with Assessment Tools: – There is no assessment tool that assesses the three child outcomes directly – Each assessment tool carries its own organizing framework, or lens – Many are organized around domains – The content of the domains isn’t always the same, even if the names are the same

46 46 Selection of an Assessment Tool Purpose for assessment drives the selection of assessment tools, e.g. – Screening: point in time look at a child – does the child need further evaluation? (Screening tool) – Evaluation: determines eligibility for services. (Norm- referenced tool) In ongoing assessment, curriculum or criterion-based assessment tools (in tandem with direct observation of children in multiple natural environments…) Curriculum or criterion-based assessment tools – informs of child’s progress & for program planning

47 47 Wisconsin’s Recommended Assessment Tools Criterion – Referenced or Curriculum Based Tools (Appropriate for ongoing assessment) AEPS Brigance (IED-II) Carolina DAYC22 DP-3 E-LAP & LAP-3 Hawaii Early Learning Profile (HELP) High Scope CORE Infant/Toddler and Preschool IGDI: 0-3 Portage Guide 3 Teaching Strategies GOLD Trans-Disciplinary Play-Based Assessment The Ounce Scale Work Sampling System Norm-Referenced Tools (Appropriate for determining eligibility) AEPS-I Battelle II Brigance (IED-II) DAYC-2 DP-3

48 48 Assessment Tools and the Child Outcomes Rating Process Does the child ever function in ways that would be considered age-appropriate with regard to [this outcome]…? (If no) Does the child use any immediate foundational skills related to [this outcome]…? To what extent is the child using these skills across settings and situations?

49 49 Age Expected (AE) / Immediate Foundational (IF) / Foundational (F) Age-Appropriate Skills & Behavior Immediate Foundational Skills Foundational Skills Foundational Skills

50 From Assessment to Rating 50 Determine what the child is doing at age-expected, immediate foundational or foundational levels.

51 Sample Child Rating Prep Tool Age-Expected Immediate Foundational Foundational Outcome One Occasionally responds to adults when asked questions using a 1-2 word response Plays next to peers in child care but not interacting yet. Outcome Two Puts together train puzzle. Listens to book being read by familiar adult but doesn’t respond to questions Plays only with hot wheels and train puzzle. Outcome Three Uses pull-up at night. Uses utensils to feed self Uses 1-2 words to express needs when hungry or thirsty 51 36 month-old child

52 52

53 Table Activity Child Rating Prep Tool 53

54 Section Four: Child Outcome 7-Point Rating Scale Objective Four: Demonstrate an understanding of the 7-point rating framework 54

55 55 A Closer Look at the 7-Point Rating Scale

56 7-Point Rating Scale Please refer to handout – “The Bucket List”

57 Practice Time! Child is 25 months old and exhibits most behaviors and skills in the 18-24 month age range across all areas of development. A few of her behaviors exhibited both at home and in child care are in the 10-12 month age range.

58 Practice Time! Child is 36-months old and when at home displays some behaviors in the 24-36 month range and some in the 36-48 range. In other settings and situations he is in, including Head Start, and at his grandparent’s house on weekends, he displays a few behaviors in the 24-36 month range but the majority of the time, in this outcome area, his functional behaviors are in the 36-48 month range.

59 Practice Time! Child is 38-months old and some of the child’s functioning falls in the 24-36 month range but more falls in the 12-24 month range. The child displays these behaviors at home but not at the grandparent’s home.

60 Practice Time! Child is 37-months old and is displaying functioning in the 36-48 month range in outcome two at home, child care and in all other settings he participates in. He occasionally has angry outbursts and has trouble calming himself. What is his rating in outcome two?

61 Practice Time! Child is 58-months old and is displaying some functional behaviors in the 4-5 yrs. age range. He displays these behaviors only in the home setting. He does not display these behaviors in other settings such as school, the library or swimming lessons. He also displays numerous behaviors that are in the 3-4 yrs. age range.

62 Practice Time! Child is 24 months old and displays functional behavior at the 6 month level in all areas of development.

63 Practice Time! Child is 26 months old and is consistently displaying behaviors in the 24-28 month age range at home, in child care and other settings. There are concerns about his behavior in child care. He refuses to ask for things he wants and takes what he wants from others even though he has the vocabulary to ask or request. When a child takes his toy, he drops to the floor kicking and screaming. This behavior is not observed in the home while interacting with his older brother.

64 Section Five: The Child Outcomes Rating Process Objective Five: Apply the Child Outcomes rating process with fidelity to accurately rate a child. 64

65 Best Practices in the Rating Process Team decision making process Always include parent/caregiver input Looking at functional behavior Behavior across settings Reference an assessment tool to determine AE-IF-F Use the Decision Tree and Bucket List in rating process Include cultural considerations when rating Do not lower rating for use of adaptive equipment Do not adjust for prematurity 65

66 Video Example Rating Process 66

67 Rating Practice 1.Working in small groups at your table, review the child rating worksheet completed previously. 2.Rate child in all three outcome areas. 3.As you are rating, discuss and record your evidence for why you are rating the child the way you did. 67

68 Completing the COSF OutcomeRelevant Evidence Outcome One – Positive Social Emotional Skills No A-E functioning. Plays next to children, observes but does not initiate play – Foundational Level. Comfortable socializing with grandparents and some adults at EHS but not other children. Outcome Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills Functioning primarily at IF level e.g. follows 1-2 step direction, uses 1-2 word sentences. Doing one thing at A-E level (7-9 piece puzzle but that is all). Not consistent across settings - listens to book with grandparents but not as long at school. Outcome Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs 68

69 Including Parents in the Rating Process? Functional Assessment Process (gathering information on child’s everyday functioning) – Parents always included Decision Making Process (rating of the child) – Use professional judgment Is the parent emotionally prepared and/or how much is the parent aware of child development? What words do you use? Do you share the ratings? 69

70 Resource for Parents An Introduction to Child Outcomes 70

71 Team Discussion - Reflection on Rating Practices Reflect on your current practices: – Are you using a team decision-making process? – How do you include parent/caregiver input? – Are you looking at functional behavior? – Are you considering the child’s behavior across settings? – Are you referencing an assessment tool? – Are you using the Decision Tree and Bucket List in the rating process? – Are you considering the unique culture of the child/family? What are you doing well? What might you need some improvement or additional focus? How does your team stay grounded in typical development? Record your thoughts on your Action Planning Guide 71

72 Section Six: Data Accuracy & Using the Data Objective Six: Analyze current rating patterns for accuracy. 72

73 From Ratings to Summary Statements 73

74 Progress categories Please refer to handout “Child Outcomes Data Conversion” Percentage of children who: a.Did not improve functioning b.Improved functioning, but not sufficient to move nearer to functioning comparable to same-aged peers c.Improved functioning to a level nearer to same-aged peers but did not reach it d.Improved functioning to reach a level comparable to same- aged peers e.Maintained functioning at a level comparable to same-aged peers 74

75

76 Summary Statement #1 Please see handout – “Summary Statements for Target Setting 1.Of those children who entered the program below age expectations in each Outcome, the percent who substantially increased their rate of growth by the time they exited the program. c + d___ a + b + c + d 76

77 Summary Statement #2 2.The percent of children who were functioning within age expectations in each Outcome by the time they exited the program. d + e__ a + b + c + d + e 77

78 Quality Data = Meaningful Summary Statements! Quality Data is: – Complete: Do you have ratings for all the children you should? – Accurate: Are they rated accurately? 78

79 Predicted Pattern – Entry Rating Distribution Children will differ from one another in their entry scores in reasonable ways (e.g., fewer scores at the high and low ends of the distribution, more scores in the middle). Rationale: Evidence suggests EI and ECSE serve more mildly than severely impaired children (e.g., few ratings/scores at lowest end). Few children receiving services would be expected to be considered as functioning typically (few ratings/scores in the typical range). 79

80 7-Point Rating Scale Please refer to handout – “The Bucket List”

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83 83

84 District & County Data Available Today Counties – Data from analytic calculator showing Progress Categories, Summary Statement Percentages, and Entry/Exit Rating Graphs. Districts – Charts with 2012-13 Exit Rating Distribution by Disability, and 2013-14 Entry Rating Distribution by Disability. 84

85 Sample from Progress Calculator 85

86 Sample from Progress Calculator 86

87 Team Data Discussion: Questions to Consider What do you notice about your data? What is your data telling you? What questions do you have when you look at your data? Is it what you would expect to see? Why, why not? Do the ratings appear to accurately reflect the children who exited in 2012-2013? 87

88 Next Steps – Final Action Planning Objective Seven: Appraise current IFSP or IEP process to identify areas for possible improvement in obtaining quality child outcome data. 88

89 Action Planning Guide Highlight the top three priorities for you or your team. Tear off the white copy of your Action Planning Guide and drop off on your way out. 89

90 Wrap-Up In your teams create a 2-3 sentence statement that summarizes the intent or purpose of this indicator that can be shared with your families, team and stakeholders. (Please record on the “Purpose Statement” in your vinyl folder and drop off on your way out.) 90

91 Thank You for Your Participation Today Watch for the Evaluation in Your Email in the Next Few Days and Thank You for Sharing Your Feedback With Us! 91


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