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Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of.

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Presentation on theme: "Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Child Outcomes Professional Development – Integrating Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process
A Department of Health Birth-to-3 Program and Department of Public Instruction Early Childhood Special Education Cross-System Collaboration All three – Dana, Elizabeth, Ruth HO – Power point slides (3 slides per page with lines for notes) Show slide as participants enter room Welcome participants – express appreciation of them taking a day of their time to participate in this child outcomes professional development opportunity. Share this has been a collaboration between the Department of Health Services – Birth-to-3 Program and the Department of Public Instruction Section 619.

2 Who’s Facilitating Today?
Ruth Chvojicek – Statewide Part B Child Outcomes Coordinator Dana Romary – State Birth-to-3 Program Program & Policy Specialist Elizabeth Wahl – Birth-to-3 Program Professional Development Specialist Each person introduces self Dana Introduce other state staff, RESource staff, and/or PST’s present who will help facilitate small group discussions.

3 Raise your hand if: You are new in your position and new to child outcomes work… You are not new in your position but new to child outcomes work… You haven’t participated in a child outcomes professional development in many years (4 years ago or more)… You have participated in a child outcomes or indicator professional development in the last two years… Dana To get a sense of the level of knowledge & experience in the room - click through questions one at a time. Also, ask participants to raise hand by position: early childhood teacher/educator, speech/language pathologist, director of special education, county coordinator, OT/PT, psych, other?

4 Today’s Objectives Participants will know and be able to:
State the purpose of Part C Indicator 3 / Part B Indicator7; Demonstrate an understanding of typical child development within the context of the three Child Outcomes; Utilize functional assessment practices in the Child Outcomes rating process; Demonstrate an understanding of the 7-point rating framework; Apply the Child Outcomes rating process with fidelity to accurately rate a child; Analyze current rating patterns for accuracy; Appraise current IFSP or IEP process to identify areas for possible improvement in obtaining quality Child Outcome data. Dana Explain that we approached this day by thinking about what folks need to know or be able to do regardless of whether you work with children in B-3 or 3-5 age range. So, the all the activities we will be doing today apply across the entire B-6 age range. The work is the same. We will be including aspects of the work that is specific to B-3 or 3 through 5 – such as how and where to enter the data. Explain that these objectives are each connected to activities in which participants will demonstrate their ability to carry out the objectives throughout the day.

5 Do you have something to ask or a resource to share?
Put it on the backchannel… Ruth Explain that Today’s Meet is like a web-based “parking lot”. Participants can ask questions or post resources. Give the web address (could also put on brightly colored paper on the tables) and go to the live site. Post a welcome question to show how to enter something. Someone will monitor the conversation throughout the day. Also show how to get the transcript – the transcript will be available for a month following the training.

6 Housekeeping Post your questions on TodaysMeet
Use breaks and lunch to respond to and phone Discussion time built into the day Ruth Break / Lunchtime for /phone calls Discussion time built in – encourage keeping sidebar conversations down for sound purposes Encourage to stay the entire day Share where restrooms are

7 Integrating Child Outcomes Into the IFSP / IEP Process
Conduct Functional Assessment within Child’s Everyday Settings Share 3 Outcome Areas with Family Pre IFSP / IEP Probe for Functioning in Outcome Areas Summary of Child’s Present Level of Development Described in Outcome Areas Complete Entry Rating at Time of IFSP / IEP Report Entry Rating Data IFSP / IEP Conduct Ongoing Assessment to Track Child’s Progress Inform Family of Child’s Progress in Outcome Areas Complete Exit Rating at Time of Exit Using Information from Ongoing Assessment Across Settings Report Exit Rating Data Post Initial IFSP/IEP to Exit Ruth Reference HO: Integrating Child and Family Outcomes into the IFSP Process / flip side … IEP Process Explain that carrying out the child outcomes procedures is intended to flow naturally into the work already being done in the IFSP / IEP process. For example, prior to the IFSP / IEP Meeting you are already gathering information on the child’s functioning for purpose of evaluating the child for services. In this training we will practice how to enhance that process for child outcomes. During the IFSP / IEP meeting you are already sharing information about the child’s development in a discussion of the child’s “Summary of Development” or for districts, “Present Level of Academic Achievement & Functional Performance”. We will practice how to organize that discussion, and the associated paperwork, according to the three outcome areas. And finally, once services begin following the IFSP or IEP the process of doing ongoing assessment to track the child’s progress can also be done to inform you of the child’s functioning in the three outcome areas. Our hope and intent is that you will see how this is “not just something extra to do”. Rather, the work of this indicator should enhance and ultimately strengthen your current work by thinking about children in a more functional way.

8 What it Takes to Carry Out Child Outcome with Fidelity
Action Planning Guide What it Takes to Carry Out Child Outcome with Fidelity Infrastructure Leadership Staff Competence Elizabeth Introduce the HO – Action Planning Guide Throughout the training as you hear ideas for possible enhancements to your system we encourage you to jot them down on your Action Planning Guide. There will be several specific times that we will give your team time to discuss your system. This Action Planning Guide is on carbonless paper because at the end of the day we will be collecting one copy from you that we will use to inform and guide our future regional and statewide technical assistance.

9 Next Steps - Fidelity Infrastructure Leadership Staff Competence
Team Meeting Time for Rating Process Implementing New IFSP / IEP Structured in 3 Outcomes Implementing Ongoing Assessment Tool Leadership Leadership Understanding and Support Run Data Reports and Share with Team on Regular Basis Recognize and Support Team Time Staff Competence More Training Typical Child Development More Practice in How to Have Conversation with Families Training in Ongoing Assessment and Use of Tool Viewing Children More Functionally Elizabeth

10 Section One: Purpose of the Indicator
Objective One : State the purpose of Indicator 3/7 Ruth In section one we will begin by discussing the purpose of this indicator. Across the state we frequently hear questions and comments from folks wondering why we are doing this indicator. What is the data used for? How do we know this isn’t just more “busy work?” As the objective states, one of the goals for this day is that you will not only understand why you are doing this but you will also be able to clearly delineate the purpose to parents and stakeholders you work with.

11 ECO Goal Statement “…To enable young children to be active and successful participants during the early childhood years and in the future in a variety of settings – in their homes with their families, in child care, in preschool or school programs, and in the community.” (from Early Childhood Outcomes Center, Ruth Reference HO – Child Outcomes At-a-Glance Share – When this indicator appeared in IDEA in 2004, ECO – or the Early Childhood Outcomes Center which was the federal technical assistance center operating at that time developed this statement that has been instrumental in guiding the development of our WI statewide child outcomes procedures. Review parts of the statement: “to be active and successful participant” – nationally we have a common reference for what active and successful means and that is “typically developing functional behavior”. That is why we ask you, as part of the rating process to determine whether the child is functioning at age-expected ways. “in a variety of settings” – It is important to always gather information on how the child functions across settings when determining if the child has an exceptional educational need and also for the accurate rating of a child for outcomes.

12 Table Discussion What does active participation look like in typically developing children? Ruth Directions: Assign picture to table(s) (reference the pictures – playing at the playground, grocery shopping, eating meals, swimming, or being in a group in school. Remember to tell them to write down their notes – will be coming back to this. If you are B-3 think about an 18-month old child and if you are 3-5 think of a 48-month old child. What are things you would a typically developing child to do (or behave like) in the situation you selected? Think about what you will actually see the child doing. Have at least one person on your table write down these behaviors because we are going to be referring to the list later in the day. Gather some of the behaviors from the large group – try to get a few behaviors from each picture/situation. List the functional behaviors that are shared. In discussion point out the FUNCTIONALITY of the behaviors as opposed to being skill focused.

13 A Paradigm Shift… We are “thinking about children differently” Comparison of child to typical development – NOT individual progress of child Focus on everyday “global” functional behavior – NOT discreet skills Integrated behavior – NOT behavior described in domains or “silos” Dana Over the past few years we are hearing from district and county teams that they find they are “thinking about children differently”. What does this mean? This indicator is forcing us to thinking about the functional behaviors of children – which has always been important when developing functional goals. This indicator is placing heightened emphasis on this. This indicator is also pushing us to look at children in a more integrated fashion and not in those isolated “domains” or “silos” many of us are well versed in (large motor, social emotional, cognitive, etc.) As an example reference the picture and ask, “What’s happening there?” The other thing that is happening in the child outcomes rating process is the need to compare the child to typical development. Typical development is the benchmark. In the IFSP/IEP process you will still be capturing the child’s individual growth for the family. But, the purpose of this indicator it to be able to measure the progress of children across the state collectively – not individually. This is a paradigm shift – and often paradigm shifts are difficult. It takes time to “think differently”. But, the more you use the strategies we are suggesting today, the more you will find your mind making the shift naturally.

14 Value of Child Outcomes Data
8/13/2014 Value of Child Outcomes Data Federal government is driving force behind child outcomes data collection But there are many reasons to collect and use the child outcomes: Examine program effectiveness Use data for program improvement Ultimately, to better serve children and families Dana So, why are we gathering this child outcomes data. What is the ultimate purpose? Federally, we are being asked to be more accountable for our work. The main intent of this indicator is that the data be used to enhance program effectiveness…. Which ultimately helps us to serve children and families better.

15 Program Evaluation The percent of preschool children with IFSPs or IEPs who demonstrate improved Positive social emotional skills Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills, and Appropriate action to meet needs. Dana This is the wording of the Indicator from IDEA 2004. Intent is NOT child specific evaluation. It is also NOT connected to your funding or teacher effectiveness. You will however be able to use this data to analyze in different ways to explore how children are making progress as a result of you providing early intervention / special education services to them.

16 Data Sent to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in the Annual Performance Report (APR)
Summary Statement One – The % of Children Who Substantially Increased Their Rate of Growth By The Time They Exited The Program Summary Statement Two – The % of Children Who Were Functioning Within Age-Expectations By The Time They Exited the Program Outcome One – Positive Social Emotional Skills 56.1% 62.3% Outcome Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills 45.9% Outcome Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs 66.9% 64.5% Dana This is what the data looks like that is sent in on the Annual Performance Report to the Office of Special Education Programs. There are two Summary Statements that all the data gets condensed into: read SS#1 and SS#1. We are not going into detail on what these numbers mean right now - later in the day we will be explaining how these %’s are arrived at.

17 Section Two: The Three Outcomes
Objective Two: Demonstrate an understanding of typical child development within the context of the three Child Outcomes Outcome One: Positive Social Emotional Skills Outcome Three: Appropriate Action to Meet Needs Outcome Two: Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills Elizabeth In section two we will dig deeper into the three outcomes. One of the core pieces of knowledge that folks must have is a clear understanding of the skills and behaviors that fall into each of the three outcome areas. Reference Handout: The Three Outcomes We encourage people to reference this handout that lists the categories of behaviors that fall into each of the three outcomes. The COSF contains only a few bullet points of behaviors and does not include a full definition of the outcomes. This handout is how the three outcomes are defined across the country.

18 The Three Outcomes Outcome One: Positive Social Emotional Skills
Outcome Three: Appropriate Action to Meet Needs Outcome Two: Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills Elizabeth Refer to HO: The Three Outcomes The list of behaviors listed on this handout is federally defined and this is what is used by all states. One of the important pieces of knowledge needed to carry out the child outcomes process is to have a clear understanding of what behaviors fall into each of the three outcome areas.

19 Step by Step Video

20 Table Discussion Elizabeth Directions for participants:
Bring out the list of functional behaviors that you brainstormed earlier when we showed this slide. Now, working again within your table group, divide these behaviors according to the outcome the behavior falls into. For example, what outcome would a behavior such as “Child asks for more food while eating a meal” – outcome three. In large group ask what they discovered in this process.

21 Louie Elizabeth

22 Austin & Sander

23 Alecia Elizabeth Review directions on screen. Encourage to note behaviors in writing as we will be asking them for their observations following the clip. Notes on Alecia – Alecia uses own language to try to communicate with other children so there isn’t two-way communication. The functionality of the communication isn’t present.

24 Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults
Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Because of this, Ed’s parents have enrolled him in the district’s four-year old kindergarten program (4K). Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. Elizabeth In the objective for this part of the training states that “Participants will demonstrate an understanding of the behaviors that fall within each of the three outcome areas. You have been practicing doing this in the video clips but another way you can use your knowledge of the outcome areas within your day-to-day work is to write your IFSP Summary or Development OR IEP Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) organized according to the three outcomes – rather than the traditional domains and/or narrative that we have historically used. This is an example of a PLAAFP statement written in a narrative format. This comes from a document on the DPI Website – Guide to Writing IEPs

25 Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults
Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Because of this, Ed’s parents have enrolled him in the district’s four-year old kindergarten program (4K). Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. Elizabeth This is the same information except it has been color coded according to the outcome to which the information applies. The red is outcome one, green is outcome two, and blue is outcome three. (Pause a few seconds for participants to review).

26 Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults.
One – Social Emotional Skills Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs Ed is a four-year-old student who spends most of his time with adults. He has had few experiences playing with children his age. Ed’s mom reports he likes to “have his own way” and “doesn’t listen.” When with other children, he cannot share or interact with toys without adult assistance. He becomes frustrated and bangs his toys or objects on the floor, or throws them at the other children. His parents find it difficult to read stories to Ed because of his short attention span (less than three minutes). He is able to play alone with toys for two to three minutes. His short attention span and frustration level interferes with his ability to recall information from books read to him and with learning new concepts through interaction with toys in his environment. Ed is able to eat by himself and put on his underclothes, t-shirt and elastic band pants. He is not fully toilet trained at this time. He averages 5 to 6 “accidents” per week. Ed is able to walk, run, and jump independently. He is very active and especially likes to play on the swing set. Elizabeth Now on this slide, it is exactly the same content again, but the information is reordered so that it is now organized by the three outcomes. Once again, it is exactly the same content as the information that was on the previous slide. The information about Ed’s functional behavior is still there, and it is still adequate baseline information. By organizing the information into the three outcomes, however, it makes the task of rating Ed in the three outcome areas – which is a federal requirement – a little easier. The information in this slide was developed before consideration of Indicator 7. As I was preparing this slide, it occurred to me that some additional information could be added to these statements that would be helpful in rating Ed for Indicator 7. For example, these statements say nothing about whether Ed is displaying these behaviors at home or just at 4K, and it doesn’t mention how Ed displays these behaviors in other settings, if there are any, such as the park. This information would be helpful not just when doing the rating for Indicator 7 but also when writing the goal statements. There is one other large area of Ed’s development that is not represented in this example. Ask if anyone wants to guess what area that is? (Speech-language)

27 Practice - Directions On your table is a sample narrative of a child’s summary of development. Using the hand highlighters provided, decide which behaviors fall into each of the three outcomes. Highlight the behaviors in a different color for each of the three outcome areas. Elizabeth Activity Handout: Jessa Explain directions on slide – use highlighters on table.

28 Activity – Practice Answer
Elizabeth Screen shows answer key to highlighting Reference – Handouts: Timothy - I9 Present Level, and B-3 IFSP

29 Timer Put up online timer to show time remaining

30 Section Three: Functional Assessment
Objective Three: Utilize functional assessment practices in the Child Outcomes rating process Ruth Section Three is on the topic of Functional Assessment. Hopefully participants had a chance to review the online module on Assessment in Early Childhood Setting so that we all have a common language. The objective for this section is that you will Utilize Functional Assessment Practices as part of the Child Rating Process. And, actually, we hope that you will utilize functional assessment practices in your day-to-day practices and not just for outcomes rating purposes.

31 Table Discussion What comes to mind when you hear the word assessment?
Ruth Post question on screen to participants and give a few minutes to discuss. Gather a few responses from large group. It’s likely that what came to mind for some of you was something along the lines of evaluation, for some of you the screening process may come to mind, and for some of you the process used in ongoing assessment may have been the first thing in that came to you. If you were able to view the pre-module on Assessment in Early Childhood Settings you heard that there are five basic types or purposes of assessment that are done within the early childhood world: 1. Screening 2. Evaluation 3. Program Evaluation 4. Assessment to Track a Child’s Progress 5. Assessment to Inform Intervention/Instruction (Note Assessment to track a child’s progress and inform instruction is commonly referred to as ongoing assessment – which is what we will be discussing in more detail today.

32 DEC Recommended Practices - Assessment Revised 2014
At your tables review the 11 recommended practices What practices are you carrying out well? What practices are more challenging for you? Ruth Another excellent resource available to us are the Division of Early Childhood (DEC) Recommended practices on Assessment. They were recently updated and made available on the DEC website. Reference HO – DEC Recommended Practices – Assessment Activity: In table groups read through the practices and briefly discuss the principles that you feel you are carrying out well and those that are more challenging for you. This may be an area of future PD for you

33 What is Functional Assessment?
Assessment of the young child’s skills in the real life contexts of family, culture and community rather than discrete isolated tasks irrelevant to daily life “the science of the strange behavior of children, with strange adults, in strange settings for the briefest possible period of time.” Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Ruth Our objective for this section is that participants will utilize functional assessment practices in the child outcomes process. We’ve been discussing evidence-based assessment practices but we’ve now introduced this new term – “Functional Assessment”. So what is Functional Assessment? Read definition on top of slide and play fun clip. Functional or authentic assessment of a young child’s skills happens in the real life contexts of family, culture and community rather than in isolation. Functional assessment results in reflecting the “whole child”. Urie Bronfenbrenner (Ecological Systems Theorist) quipped that assessment is “the science of the strange behavior of children, with strange adults, in strange settings for the briefest possible period of time.” There are many right ways to provide functional assessment including a transdisciplinary play-based model, or in conjunction with intentionally designed ongoing functional assessment. When we truly value authentic information gathered from a functional assessment we can approach more traditional evaluation in ways that are child and family friendly. Functional assessment takes place in the context of everyday behaviors with familiar adults in comfortable, known settings and over time. It relies on information reported by those who know the child well and have observed the child’s ongoing development and learning. NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

34 Functional Assessment
Our Focus Shifts From To Knows how to make eye contact, smile, and give a hug Initiates affection toward caregivers and respond to others’ affection Knows how to imitate a gesture when prompted by others Watches what a peer says or does and incorporate it into his/her own play Uses finger in pointing motion Points to indicate needs or wants Shows a skill in a specific situation Uses a skill in actions across settings and situations to accomplish something meaningful to the child Ruth Our focus shifts from specific skills in specific situations to a more complete functional picture of the child. For example, our focus shifts from noticing that the child makes eye contact, smiles and gives hugs to noticing how the child initiates affection with the important people in his/her life. Trainer Notes: Review the examples on the slide and invite participants to share their own examples. NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

35 Who performs Functional Assessment?
Families and familiar, knowledgeable caregivers in the child’s life Providers Teachers Others, less familiar, can also contribute Ruth The authentic assessment of infants/toddlers and preschoolers requires specialized training and skills beyond the training and skills needed for older children. Team members should include individuals who have the expertise necessary to assess the unique needs of the young child suspected of having a disability. Functional Assessment is conducted by a team of families and professionals from various disciplines. The team can observe and analyze a wide range of tasks/skills and provide a greater sampling of behaviors in real and natural contexts. Functional information enhances team observations and validates team findings. Of course, when we work in teams, communication between and among team members is needed to provide a coordinated process, minimize the intrusiveness of the process for the child, family, and others in the setting, and to ensure that a comprehensive process is completed. NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

36 When is Functional Assessment performed?
Over Time “One-time observations even in the natural context, are insufficient and often misleading.” Ruth You’ve probably already noticed that observation is a theme throughout this section. Functional assessment involves: observation of the child in natural circumstances, and information shared about the observations of people familiar with the child. When families share their observations, we develop a more complete and accurate picture of the child. It’s important to let families know that you value their observations and participation in ongoing authentic assessment. Giving families concrete examples of the kinds of information you would like them to share is helpful. Functional assessment is conducted over time and across settings. Bagnato, S.J., Neisworth, J.T., & Pretti-Frontczak, K. Linking Authentic Assessment and Early Childhood Intervention -Best Measures for Best Practices, Second Edition. Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, MD NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

37 How is Functional Assessment performed?
Knowing the purpose for the assessment is important Observation is essential: Keep a focus on being objective vs. subjective Record keeping is key: Qualitative Quantitative Hearing from others who know the child is critical – involve families! Ruth Functional assessment is done through gathering and compiling information about the child’s functioning from multiple sources, using multiple approaches to assessment, and observing across multiple settings in order to yield information that links assessment to services, programs and outcomes. Selecting appropriate assessment tools is an important part of the functional assessment process, so being clear about the purpose of the assessment is critical. Tests may be norm referenced, criterion referenced or curriculum based; however, the most reliable information about young children is generated when these tools are used within an authentic/functional assessment model, which includes record review, developmental history, interviews, checklists/rating scales, anecdotal recordings, portfolios, technology and observation. It is important to note that data gathered from more traditional methods are not as effective in providing functional information for developing IFSPs and IEPs, developing outcomes or goals, in planning services, or in measuring the 3 global outcomes, hence the need for using multiple sources of information. NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

38 Where is Functional Assessment performed?
Only in the children’s natural everyday settings, activities, and routines Ruth Where is functional assessment conducted? It is conducted only in the child’s natural everyday settings, activities and routines. Trainer notes: Ask the participants:  “How do you know where that is?” Then respond, “Ask the family!” NECTAC/ECO/WRRC 2012

39 A Functional Assessment Conversation
As you listen to this brief conversation, the right side of the room will listen for the types of questions being asked that provide information on each of the three outcome areas. What types of questions did you find helpful in gathering information about the child’s functioning in the three outcome areas? Dana / Elizabeth Dana and either Ruth or Elizabeth role play a conversation. Can also ask a participant with a young child to volunteer talking with Dana. Divide room in half, give directions. After role play gather a few answers. Pose reflection question to think about for county/district discussion later.

40 A Functional Assessment Conversation
The left side of the room will listen for information about the child’s functional development. What types of things did you learn about the child in outcome 1-2-3? Continue from previous slide

41 Practice Discussion Form groups of three - select a parent, caregiver and observer. Have a conversation to gather information on the child’s functioning in the three outcomes. Use “Discussion Prompts” handout for ideas of questions. Observers record what you hear about the child’s functioning in the three outcomes. Dana Activity - Practice Discussions Give directions on slide Reference HO – Discussion Prompts and HO - Child Outcomes Web Note: Caregiver can be anyone who knows the child well e.g. parent, grandparent, childcare provider, etc. – select using a real child to make the discussion as real as possible. Give about 10 minutes for the conversation.

42 Reflecting on Your Discussions
For the caregivers: What did it feel like for you to have this conversation? For the interviewer: What was this experience like for you? What did you learn about the process of asking questions? For the observers: Did you get information about the child’s functioning in the three outcomes? Did you get enough information? Dana Ask questions to large group.

43 Team Discussion Working in your county or district team, think about your assessment process “back home”. How is a functional assessment conversation the same or different from your current assessment practices to gather information on a child’s functional behavior? Who is gathering information on a child’s everyday functioning? How is it gathered and documented? When is it done? How is it shared with others on your team? How are all team members, including OT/PT and other therapists included in this discussion? How do you document the child’s functioning in an ongoing way to track child’s progress AND to inform ratings? How do your practices compare to the 11 DEC Recommended Practices on Assessment? Record your ideas for possible enhancement of your program practices on your Action Planning Guide Dana County / District Team Discussion Remind participants to put notes on Action Plan

44 Let group know time we are starting again

45 Assessment Tools “Age-Anchoring” Assessment tools provide information on the age level a child is functioning for each of the three outcome areas. Limitations with Assessment Tools: There is no assessment tool that assesses the three child outcomes directly Each assessment tool carries its own organizing framework, or lens Many are organized around domains The content of the domains isn’t always the same, even if the names are the same Ruth Information gathered on a child from an assessment tool is evidence that justifies your responses about what age-level the child is functioning at in all three outcomes. Nationally the term “Age-Anchoring” Assessment Tool is being used. But, there are also limitations with using assessment tools. There is no one instrument that assesses the three outcomes directly. Information from formal or published assessment tools can be very useful, but it needs to be understood and used in the context of achievement of the three outcomes.

46 Selection of an Assessment Tool
Purpose for assessment drives the selection of assessment tools, e.g. Screening: point in time look at a child – does the child need further evaluation? (Screening tool) Evaluation: determines eligibility for services. (Norm-referenced tool) In ongoing assessment, curriculum or criterion-based assessment tools (in tandem with direct observation of children in multiple natural environments…) Curriculum or criterion-based assessment tools – informs of child’s progress & for program planning Ruth The selection of an appropriate assessment tool can be overwhelming but an important criteria that should always be considered is the purpose of the tool. A screen tool is used for screening purposes. A norm-referenced (which is often standardized) tool is appropriate for determining eligibility for special education services. A criterion-referenced, or as they are sometimes called, curriculum-based assessment tool is appropriate for ongoing assessment. This type of tool is an appropriate choice when looking at a child’s functioning across settings over a prolonged period of time. Show document Promoting Positive Outcomes (DEC/NAEYC Position Paper) – reference available on

47 Wisconsin’s Recommended Assessment Tools
Criterion – Referenced or Curriculum Based Tools (Appropriate for ongoing assessment) Norm-Referenced Tools (Appropriate for determining eligibility) AEPS-I Battelle II Brigance (IED-II) DAYC-2 DP-3 AEPS Brigance (IED-II) Carolina DAYC22 DP-3 E-LAP & LAP-3 Hawaii Early Learning Profile (HELP) High Scope CORE Infant/Toddler and Preschool IGDI: 0-3 Portage Guide 3 Teaching Strategies GOLD Trans-Disciplinary Play-Based Assessment The Ounce Scale Work Sampling System Ruth Reference HO – Wisconsin’s Recommended Assessment Tools Unfortunately, we don’t have time within this day to delve into detail about specifics of certain assessment tools. For districts this is something that your local CESA PST can help you with. Some of the CESAs throughout the state are also offering trainings on Assessment (that Ruth is doing) so check with your local PST. Ruth have available flyer with assessment trainings in CESA

48 Assessment Tools and the Child Outcomes Rating Process
Does the child ever function in ways that would be considered age-appropriate with regard to [this outcome]…? (If no) Does the child use any immediate foundational skills related to [this outcome]…? To what extent is the child using these skills across settings and situations? Elizabeth Reference HO: The Decision Tree There are two basic questions that are asked on The Decision Tree and discussed when determining the child’s entry or exit rating. They are: Does the child ever function in ways that would be considered age-appropriate with regard to [this outcome]? (If no) Does the child use any immediate foundational skills related to [this outcome]? And, To what extent is the child using these skills across settings and situations? As we stated earlier, data gathered from an assessment tool is the evidence that justifies your answer to these questions. It makes the whole decision making process more objective / less subjective and ultimately helps make your data more accurate. Add little picture of the Decision Tree

49 Age Expected (AE) / Immediate Foundational (IF) / Foundational (F)
Age-Appropriate Skills & Behavior Immediate Foundational Skills Elizabeth Foundational skills are those that occur earlier than, and serve as the foundation for, later skill development. Immediate foundational skills are those that immediately precede age-appropriate skills and behavior on a developmental continuum. For example, children play along side one another, or do parallel play, before they engage in cooperative play When the answer to the first question on the decision tree is no then the second question being asked is referring to immediate foundational skills. It is especially important to use information provided by the ongoing assessment tool done on the child when answering this question. Foundational Skills Foundational Skills

50 From Assessment to Rating
Functional Assessment Preparing for the IFSP/ IEP & Rating Child Outcomes Rating Elizabeth In preparation for rating the child – and ultimately in preparation for the child’s initial IFSP/IEP – there is a valuable step that you can take that will make the actual rating of the child go easily and quickly AND more reliable or accurate. It involves gathering all the information you’ve collected on a child and organizing the information into what the child is exhibiting at Age-Expected, Immediate Foundational, or Foundational Levels. Again, this is why using a tool is very important because it’s going to keep you grounded in what typical development is. Determine what the child is doing at age-expected, immediate foundational or foundational levels.

51 Sample Child Rating Prep Tool
36 month-old child Age-Expected Immediate Foundational Foundational Outcome One Occasionally responds to adults when asked questions using a 1-2 word response Plays next to peers in child care but not interacting yet. Outcome Two Puts together train puzzle. Listens to book being read by familiar adult but doesn’t respond to questions Plays only with hot wheels and train puzzle. Outcome Three Uses pull-up at night. Uses utensils to feed self Uses 1-2 words to express needs when hungry or thirsty Elizabeth Reference Handout – Child Rating Prep Tool (previous Child Rating Worksheet) Explain sample on screen completed for fictional child.

52 Nevaeh 36-months New Portage Guide ASQ – III
Head Start Parents, Grandparents, Older Brother Served Inclusively in Head Start by ECSE Birth-to-3 since 18 Months New Portage Guide ASQ – III Medical Evaluation related to Seizures Observations Completed: Home Grandparents Elizabeth Reference Navaeh - Case Study Briefly introduce the case study child . Share the child’s background and environments. Also share what has been done to gather information on the child e.g. RBI, New Portage Guide, Observations at the child’s child care and at home. .

53 Table Activity Child Rating Prep Tool
Elizabeth Material – Child Rating Prep Tool (extra on table) Material – Nevaeh Portage Guide 3 Directions: Working together at table, refer to NPG Synopsis and complete the Child Rating Prep Tool

54 Section Four: Child Outcome 7-Point Rating Scale
Objective Four: Demonstrate an understanding of the 7-point rating framework Ruth In this section we will review the description of each of the 7 points on the rating scale and will practice our understanding of the distinctions. between them.

55 A Closer Look at the 7-Point Rating Scale
Ruth Reference HANDOUT – The Decision Tree again We will now take a closer look at the 7-Point Rating Scale. Having a clear understanding of the distinction between the 7 points will make the decision made by the team less subjective and more objective. You will note that the 7-Point Scale on page 2 of the COSF and the 7-Points at the bottom of the Decision Tree are the same.

56 7-Point Rating Scale Please refer to handout – “The Bucket List”
Ruth This is the 7-point rating scale used in the Child Outcome Summary process. This slide is the same information that is found on the handout, “The Bucket List”. In review, when a child is rated a 6 or 7 that is essentially saying that a child is functioning at an age-expected level in the specific outcome level. At the other end of the continuum, a rating of 1 is saying the child is functioning below both age-expected and immediate foundational levels. A rating of 4 and 5 is saying that a child is functioning with a combination of age-expected and immediate foundational skills. And, a rating of 2 and 3 is saying that a child is functioning with a combination of foundational and immediate foundational skills. We will now look at a patterns of rating within Wisconsin. It will be helpful to keep The Bucket List handout in front of you to reference throughout this discussion.

57 Practice Time! Child is 25 months old and exhibits most behaviors and skills in the month age range across all areas of development. A few of her behaviors exhibited both at home and in child care are in the month age range. Ruth Reference Activity Handout – 7-Point Rating Practice Directions: Participants may work together in small groups or at their tables to determine the rating # for each of the 7 descriptions. Review the answers pointing out the key factors that is the “evidence” or determines the rating #.

58 Practice Time! Child is 36-months old and when at home displays some behaviors in the month range and some in the range. In other settings and situations he is in, including Head Start, and at his grandparent’s house on weekends, he displays a few behaviors in the month range but the majority of the time, in this outcome area, his functional behaviors are in the month range. Ruth

59 Practice Time! Child is 38-months old and some of the child’s functioning falls in the month range but more falls in the month range. The child displays these behaviors at home but not at the grandparent’s home. Ruth

60 Practice Time! Child is 37-months old and is displaying functioning in the month range in outcome two at home, child care and in all other settings he participates in. He occasionally has angry outbursts and has trouble calming himself. What is his rating in outcome two? Ruth

61 Practice Time! Child is 58-months old and is displaying some functional behaviors in the 4-5 yrs. age range. He displays these behaviors only in the home setting. He does not display these behaviors in other settings such as school, the library or swimming lessons. He also displays numerous behaviors that are in the 3-4 yrs. age range. Ruth

62 Practice Time! Child is 24 months old and displays functional behavior at the 6 month level in all areas of development. Ruth

63 Practice Time! Child is 26 months old and is consistently displaying behaviors in the month age range at home, in child care and other settings. There are concerns about his behavior in child care. He refuses to ask for things he wants and takes what he wants from others even though he has the vocabulary to ask or request. When a child takes his toy, he drops to the floor kicking and screaming. This behavior is not observed in the home while interacting with his older brother. Ruth

64 Section Five: The Child Outcomes Rating Process
Objective Five: Apply the Child Outcomes rating process with fidelity to accurately rate a child. Dana The objective for the fifth section is, “To apply the child outcomes rating process with fidelity to accurately rate a child.” In this section participants will hear the best practices that lead to an accurate rating and will also have the opportunity to practice rating a child.

65 Best Practices in the Rating Process
Team decision making process Always include parent/caregiver input Looking at functional behavior Behavior across settings Reference an assessment tool to determine AE-IF-F Use the Decision Tree and Bucket List in rating process Include cultural considerations when rating Do not lower rating for use of adaptive equipment Do not adjust for prematurity Dana These are best practices that will help you to carry out the rating process with fidelity – to reach an accurate rating. Reference Inter-Rater Reliability Briefly review the points on the slide. Cultural considerations and adaptive equipment is part of the rating discussion. Ratings should reflect the child’s level of functioning using whatever assistive technology or special accommodations are present in the child’s day-to-day settings. Don’t adjust for prematurity

66 Video Example Rating Process
Dana Show Birth-to-3 Team discussion on child. If there are video team members present, acknowledge them to the audience. Ask for questions / comments on the video.

67 Rating Practice Working in small groups at your table, review the child rating worksheet completed previously. Rate child in all three outcome areas. As you are rating, discuss and record your evidence for why you are rating the child the way you did. Dana Directions: Review directions on slide. Review the information created earlier on Nevaeh – reference the Child Rating Prep Tool completed earlier. In follow-up discussion share option for Birth to 3, if you use the IFSP with ratings then don’t need to use COSF. Ask for ratings in each outcome and process discussion if there are questions.

68 Completing the COSF Outcome Relevant Evidence
Outcome One – Positive Social Emotional Skills No A-E functioning. Plays next to children, observes but does not initiate play – Foundational Level. Comfortable socializing with grandparents and some adults at EHS but not other children. Outcome Two – Acquisition & Use of Knowledge & Skills Functioning primarily at IF level e.g. follows 1-2 step direction, uses 1-2 word sentences. Doing one thing at A-E level (7-9 piece puzzle but that is all). Not consistent across settings - listens to book with grandparents but not as long at school. Outcome Three – Appropriate Action to Meet Needs Dana Reference HO – The Child Outcomes Summary Form Show relevant evidence of 2 outcomes and have small group do relevant evidence for final outcome and process out in large group.

69 Including Parents in the Rating Process?
Functional Assessment Process (gathering information on child’s everyday functioning) Parents always included Decision Making Process (rating of the child) Use professional judgment Is the parent emotionally prepared and/or how much is the parent aware of child development? What words do you use? Do you share the ratings? Dana Parents will always be included in the outcomes process in the process of doing the functional assessment. This will continue in the IFSP/IEP conversation in discussion of the child’s strengths and present level. Ask if participants include parents and how. FACETS recommendation is to use your professional development. This process can begin at intake by introducing the idea that we measure children’s progress and we are getting their input on how they are functioning to help us with those measures. Reference HO – Parent Brochure available on collaboratingpartners.com

70 An Introduction to Child Outcomes
Resource for Parents An Introduction to Child Outcomes Dana Reference Handout – An Introduction to Child Outcomes Click on hyperlink on screen to show where it’s available on collaboratingpartners.com

71 Team Discussion - Reflection on Rating Practices
Reflect on your current practices: Are you using a team decision-making process? How do you include parent/caregiver input? Are you looking at functional behavior? Are you considering the child’s behavior across settings? Are you referencing an assessment tool? Are you using the Decision Tree and Bucket List in the rating process? Are you considering the unique culture of the child/family? What are you doing well? What might you need some improvement or additional focus? How does your team stay grounded in typical development? Record your thoughts on your Action Planning Guide Dana Team Discussion – Give minutes Again remind participants to record ideas/plans on Action Planning Guide

72 Section Six: Data Accuracy & Using the Data
Objective Six: Analyze current rating patterns for accuracy. Ruth Our objective for this section is to introduce you to the question, “Do I have accurate or quality data?” The data discussion is a whole other day of discussion but we wanted to give you enough today to get you started in looking at the data to see if you think it reflects accurate data.

73 From Ratings to Summary Statements
Entry/Exit 1-7 Progress Categories A-B-C-D-E Summary Statement’s 1 & 2 Ruth Reference HO – Data Conversion Discussion: We started our professional development today by sharing with you the final data that gets submitted in the state Annual Performance Report to OSEP. Remind participants of the Summary Statement Percentages that were reported on by Dana at the start of the day. In this section we dig into the data a little bit further. Using the Data Conversion ho briefly explain how the entry/exit ratings get converted to Progress Categories and then the formulas that convert it to the Summary Statements that are reported to OSEP.

74 Progress categories Please refer to handout “Child Outcomes Data Conversion”
Percentage of children who: a. Did not improve functioning b. Improved functioning, but not sufficient to move nearer to functioning comparable to same-aged peers c. Improved functioning to a level nearer to same-aged peers but did not reach it d. Improved functioning to reach a level comparable to same-aged peers e. Maintained functioning at a level comparable to same-aged peers Explain the 5 progress categories using the Developmental Trajectory chart on next slide (note - C- ‘narrow the gap’; D- ‘close the gap’)

75

76 Summary Statement #1 Please see handout – “Summary Statements for Target Setting
Of those children who entered the program below age expectations in each Outcome, the percent who substantially increased their rate of growth by the time they exited the program. c + d___ a + b + c + d (Reference Data Conversion handout) At the beginning of the day we showed you an example of the data that is reported to OSEP. This is Summary Statement again – showing you the algebraic formula used in formulating the %’s reported. For each of the 3 outcome areas, states must report on children who substantially increased their rate of growth. The numerator includes ‘c’ the children who narrowed the gap and ‘d’ the children who closed the gap. Notice the denominator does not include the ‘e’ category which are the children who came in functioning at age level in that outcome area. Don’t forget, these outcome areas are measured and reported independently. So, a child may enter the program performing at age expectations in one or more of the areas. Explain that low numbers of children in your child outcomes cohort (or your county/district “n” size will definitely influence your percentage. It is often more helpful to look at the progress category percentages reported than at the Summary Statement %’s. The key concept here is ‘increased rate of growth’ (those children who narrowed the gap and those who closed the gap or caught all the way up)

77 Summary Statement #2 The percent of children who were functioning within age expectations in each Outcome by the time they exited the program. d + e__ a + b + c + d + e For each outcome area, a state must report on the percent of children who were functioning within age expectations by the time they exited the program. The numerator includes ‘d’ the children who closed the gap and ‘e’ the children who entered the program at age expectation. Some have likened this summary statement to the ‘readiness or ready to learn’ concept. These are the children leaving the program at age expectations.

78 Quality Data = Meaningful Summary Statements!
Quality Data is: Complete: Do you have ratings for all the children you should? Accurate: Are they rated accurately? Ruth Accurate data leads to meaningful and useful summary statements. When we talk about “Quality” or “Accurate” data it means we are looking at (click) – do you have all the data you should (or all the children you should) and (click) are they rated accurately? To rate accurately involves all the things we have been talking about today – engaging in thorough functional assessment of children, understanding what behaviors are part of each outcome, understanding the 7-point rating scale, using recommended practices when engaging in the rating process, and so on.

79 Predicted Pattern – Entry Rating Distribution
Children will differ from one another in their entry scores in reasonable ways (e.g., fewer scores at the high and low ends of the distribution, more scores in the middle). Rationale: Evidence suggests EI and ECSE serve more mildly than severely impaired children (e.g., few ratings/scores at lowest end). Few children receiving services would be expected to be considered as functioning typically (few ratings/scores in the typical range). Ruth This is a simple pattern check that has been found extremely helpful. So, using what we would expect, and, the research cited on this page that across the county we serve more children that fall in the mildly impaired range than severely impaired range, when we look at our entry rating distribution we would expect the highest percentage of children to fall in that mid-range.

80 7-Point Rating Scale Please refer to handout – “The Bucket List”
1 Child does not yet show functioning expected of a child his or her age in any situation. Child’s functioning does not yet include immediate foundational skills upon which to build age-appropriate functioning. Child functioning reflects skills that developmentally come before immediate foundational skills. Child’s functioning might be described as like that of a much younger child. 2 Child occasionally uses immediate foundational skills across settings and situation. More functioning reflects skills that are not immediate foundational than are immediate foundational. 3 Child does not yet show functioning expected for a child of his or her age in any situation. Child uses immediate foundational skills, most or all of the time, skills upon which to build age-appropriate functioning. Functioning might be described as like that of a younger child. 4 Child shows occasional age-appropriate functioning across settings and situations. More functioning is not age-appropriate than age-appropriate. 5 Child shows functioning expected for his or her age some of the time and/or in some settings and situations. Child’s functioning is a mix of age-appropriate and not age-appropriate behaviors and skills. Childs functioning might be described as like that of a slightly younger child. 6 Child’s functioning generally is considered appropriate for his or her age but there are some significant concerns about the child’s functioning in this outcome area. These concerns are substantial enough to suggest monitoring or possible additional support. Although age-appropriate, the child’s functioning may border on not keeping pace with age expectations. 7 Child shows functioning expected for his or her age in all or almost all everyday situations that are part of the child’s life. Functioning is considered appropriate for his or her age. No one has any concerns about the child’s functioning in this outcome area. Ruth If you were to plot the distribution of children’s entry ratings on a graph – where would you expect the majority would fall at the time of entry into early intervention? Gather input from participants. We would expect the majority of children would fall in the mid range 3-5.

81 This is an example from the Part B Data about the entry rating distribution from the last three years of data. Explain what is being shown on the graph. Also explain that after we began doing data reviews to look at the accuracy of the ratings we have seen a change in the rating patterns.

82 Here is an example of the Part B Outcome 2 entry rating pattern
Here is an example of the Part B Outcome 2 entry rating pattern. You might notice that we see a pattern that indicates children are being rated more accurately in outcome two (ask why they think this might be).

83 Ruth Here is another example that compares the entry rating distribution of the four eligibility categories with the most children. Explain the 4 eligibility criteria and ask, “What do you notice”? OHI and Autism have higher percentages of children that are rated lower – Does this make sense? Is this what you would expect? Yes Also point out the S/L distribution that has changed a great deal over the past three years.

84 District & County Data Available Today
Counties – Data from analytic calculator showing Progress Categories, Summary Statement Percentages, and Entry/Exit Rating Graphs. Districts – Charts with Exit Rating Distribution by Disability, and Entry Rating Distribution by Disability. Dana explain B-Three data available to counties in the Adobe Meeting Rooms and Ruth explains the data given to districts. District Handout – Exit Information and Entry Information Ruth Not going into more detail in looking at data quality today, explain upcoming data reviews that will be happening Feb-April in CESA’s. BIG Question – Can B-3 be invited?

85 Sample from Progress Calculator

86 Sample from Progress Calculator

87 Team Data Discussion: Questions to Consider
What do you notice about your data? What is your data telling you? What questions do you have when you look at your data? Is it what you would expect to see? Why, why not? Do the ratings appear to accurately reflect the children who exited in ? Ruth

88 Next Steps – Final Action Planning
Infrastructure Team Meeting Time for Rating Process Implementing New IFSP Structured in 3 Outcomes Implementing Ongoing Assessment Tool Leadership Leadership Understanding and Support Run Data Reports and Share with Team on Regular Basis Recognize and Support Team Time Staff Competence More Training Typical Child Development More Practice in How to have Conversation with Families Training in Ongoing Assessment and Use of Tool Viewing Children More Functionally Objective Seven: Appraise current IFSP or IEP process to identify areas for possible improvement in obtaining quality child outcome data. Elizabeth Reference : Handout - Action Planning Guide Review again the Action Planning Guide given out in the beginning of the day and share again ideas for what a next step might look like. Give 15 min or so for team to meet a final time. Think about the data section just completed and add to the action plan if desired. Share there is one more brief activity after the action planning time.

89 Action Planning Guide Highlight the top three priorities for you or your team. Tear off the white copy of your Action Planning Guide and drop off on your way out. Directions: Highlight the top three priorities your team would like to address first. Remind to leave copy of Action Planning Guide in put box on table on way out

90 Wrap-Up In your teams create a 2-3 sentence statement that summarizes the intent or purpose of this indicator that can be shared with your families, team and stakeholders. (Please record on the “Purpose Statement” in your vinyl folder and drop off on your way out.) Elizabeth Ask for volunteers to share if they choose to.

91 for Your Participation Today
Thank You for Your Participation Today Watch for the Evaluation in Your in the Next Few Days and Thank You for Sharing Your Feedback With Us! Dana / Ruth / Elizabeth Thank participants for their time and hard work today. Certificate of Attendance Certificate of Attendance available if desired on table in back.


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