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The Link: The Link: Preschool Service Options &

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1 The Link: The Link: Preschool Service Options &
Individual Education Programs (IEPs) 1.      Welcome and Introduction of team 2.      Getting to know the participants ·       What do you hope to learn today? ·       How do you feel about being here? Have participants discuss these questions with 3 other people they don’t know. From the large group ask for summary of responses. Record participant statements on large chart paper. 3.      Participants should write questions they have on sticky notes and put on parking lot. Use SIG stickys to write down any new information or ideas “ah ha’s” that will help change their parctice 9/5/03

2 Setting the Stage Why? What? How? What next?

3 Song of Our Children (video)

4 Video Resources http://www.wispdg.org/ec/video.html
Foundations of Inclusion Video DPI video Including Samuel Video

5 Why “Inclusion does not mean trying to fit students with special needs into the mainstream; instead it means creating a mainstream where everyone fits.” Snell & Janney 1992, p245

6 Full Inclusion vs LRE What is your district philosophy?
Does your community have policies in place related to inclusion? How do these policies apply to preschool? What does the law say about inclusion?

7 Why Preschool Service Options?
All children have the right to……… a free appropriate public education (FAPE) be educated in the least restrictive environment (LRE) 9/5/03

8 What does LRE mean? Each public agency shall ensure:
To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities are educated with children who are nondisabled. 34 C.F.R (a)(2)(i) 9/5/03

9 What does LRE mean? Each public agency shall ensure:
Special classes, separate schooling or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular education environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily. 34 C.F.R (a)(2)(ii) 9/5/03

10 What does the IEP have to do with LRE?
The IEP is…… the most important document written for children with disabilities. The vehicle for providing a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment (LRE). 9/5/03

11 IEP and LRE ? (continued)
The IEP is…… A communication vehicle between parents and school personnel Team of Equal participants Joint, informed decisions regarding: child’s needs and appropriate goals extent to which the child will participate in the general curriculum and regular education environment. Team listens and reacts to concerns and information Spirit and Intent of the Law (IDEA) 9/5/03

12 Every school district? Each public agency shall ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities. Self-contained is a service option along the continuum and may be an appropriate placement for some children. However, we need ensure and consider alternative placements for all children. 34 C.F.R (a) 9/5/03

13 State Performance Plan Preschool Target for Least Restrictive Environment
Preschool LRE: Increase percent of preschool children with IEPs who received special education and related services in settings with typically developing peers (e.g., early childhood settings, home and part-time early childhood special education settings). 9/5/03

14 Does your district need to comply with LRE requirement?
School district failed to comply with LRE requirement. Decision of Seventh Circuit Court: Madison Due Process Hearing Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) applies to preschool Parents of a three year old with Down syndrome disputed the placement offers made by the school district. Not having their own program for children with disabilities the district proposed placement in a program limited to students with disabilities located 5 miles form the child’s home in another district. After the parents rejected this offer the district offered to have the IEP team consider a state funded “at risk” program called Project IDEAL. There was no evidence that the district evaluated the program for the student or considered how the services would assist the child in progress in achieving the goals of the IEP. This federal decision in the 7th circuit is particularly of note to us since Wisconsin is within the 7th circuit A copy of the decision can be found in your handouts. 9/5/03

15 What does the research say?
Review References Highlight several findings from the ODOM book. Pat Wesley Handout 9/5/03

16 What is supporting us to consider LRE options?
What’s best for children and families? IDEA - It’s the law! Birth-To-3 Natural environments 3-5 A full continuum of alternative placements Wisconsin State Performance Plan State Preschool System Change Grants and mini-grants to districts Expanding Community Options Remember that LRE needs to be considered even in the smallest of school districts What’s best for children and families? What are the services being considered or implemented that are consumer driven by families and communities. What services are changing based on Early Childhood Brain Research? Transition to new slide- We have just talked about what’s best for kids. Now lets talk about kids. 9/5/03

17 How Quality legal process in place Child find IEP Eligibility
Present level…. Functional goals Measurement and reporting Placement

18 Child Find and the Law IDEA Sec. 612(a)(3) (http://idea.ed.gov.explore ) (3) Child find.-- (A) In general.--All children with disabilities residing in the State, including children with disabilities who are homeless children or are wards of the State and children with disabilities attending private schools, regardless of the severity of their disabilities, and who are in need of special education and related services, are identified, located, and evaluated and a practical method is developed and implemented to determine which children with disabilities are currently receiving needed special education and related services. Regulation in Federal Register Sec Child find.

19 Child Find and the Law Wisconsin Chapter 115
(3)(a)       (a) Ensuring that all children with disabilities, including children who are not yet 3 years of age, who reside in this state and who are in need of special education and related services are identified, located and evaluated.

20 Child Find in Wisconsin
Informed Referral Network Public Notice Community Screening Opportunities Types of Screening Developmental Vision Hearing Immunizations Health Status

21 Child Find Resources CESA 6
Collaborating Partners website

22 Quality IEP Process and Product
What constitutes a quality IEP process and product? We are going to introduce a young child and his family to you and demonstrate what a quality IEP process and product can look like. 9/5/03

23 Considering a Continuum of Alternative Placements
The discussion begins with these questions: Where does this child spend time during the day? Where are typically developing children this age in this community? Can the child’s goal and objectives be implemented in the current setting(s) and/or in other settings with same age peers? What other settings for service delivery would address the child’s goals and objectives? What settings have been considered and rejected? Will special education and related services be provided at no cost to the parents?

24 Spirit and intent of IDEA
Parents……….. Required involvement & participation in: Evaluation IEP Placement Parents and school personnel are EQUAL participants Cheri’s slide Why involve the family. It’s at the heart of the spirit and intent of the law. The family is involved throughout the process. 9/5/03

25 Family Involvement “Effective partnerships between parents and professionals require collaboration. It is hard work.” Janice Fialka Cheri’s slide “Effective partnerships between parents and professionals require collaboration. Plopped right in the middle of that word you will find the word “labor.” Partnership is labor. It is hard work.” Cite book “Do You Hear What I hear” 9/5/03

26 First Step: Making an Eligibility Determination
9/5/03

27 Eligibility Is there an impairment?
Is there a need for special education? (e.g. Does the impairment adversely effect the child’s educational performance?) PI (2) Add note from PI 11.35 9/5/03

28 Areas of Impairment Cognitive Disability
Orthopedic Impairment Visual Impairment Hearing Impairment Speech or Language Impairment Specific Learning Disability Emotional Behavioral Disability Autism Traumatic Brain Injury Other Health Impaired Significant Developmental Delay Federal law provides general definition of eligibility for services but each state is responsible for exact criteria and procedures. 9/5/03

29 Assessment Assessment results are not useful unless referenced against expectations in the natural environment. (Bronfenbrenner, 1977) Diagnostic instruments compare a child to a norming population. They are useful in identifying developmental deficits. Diagnostic instruments do not tell us what children need to learn to participate in activities and routines. In planning functional goals and objectives, the use of diagnostic assessment instruments should be supplemented with information gathered from interviews or observations of the child’s typical functioning in the natural environment. 9/5/03

30 Assessment Assessment is pre-planned Assessment is individualized
Assessment provides useful information Decision making is collaborative McLean 2003 9/5/03

31 Assessment Current trends in best practice Family centered assessment
Utilizing natural environments Collaborative approaches to assessment by all team members Hand out on components of quality assessment McLean, Wolery, &Bailey. (2004). Assessing Infants and Preschoolers with Special Needs. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall 9/5/03

32 Prepare Parents for Participation
Formal and informal discussion (identify who will work with the family) Routines Based Interviewing (trademarked process) Step Ahead at Age 3 (birth-to-3 resource) Positive Student Profile

33 Routines Based Interview
Prepare Families to Report Routines. Families Report on their Routines. Teacher (child care or preschool) reports on classroom routines. Interviewer Reviews Concerns and Strengths. Family has key role in Prioritizing Outcomes or Goals Functional Intervention Planning: The Routines Based Interview-handout in section 5

34 Timothy Turning Three-Years-Old Spends his day in child care
Received Birth-To-3 service at child care Birth-To-3 made referral to the school district Describe Ed and discuss parent involvement in the assessment process. 9/5/03

35 Timothy’s Evaluation for Eligibility
Review of current assessment Observation of Timothy Timothy’s family involved in the assessment process Routines Based Interview Other team members involved Look at Ed’s Summary of findings. 9/5/03

36 See Facilitating the IEP Team Process
Facilitator Put everyone at ease Identify purpose of meeting Introductions Encourage information from all participants Clarify, rephrase and summarize Keep meeting focused Record on charts See Facilitating the IEP Team Process 9/5/03

37 See Facilitating the IEP Team Process
Recorder Record information on IEP forms Clarify if necessary See Facilitating the IEP Team Process 9/5/03

38 Parents Required involvement and participation in: Evaluation IEP
Placement 9/5/03

39 General Education Teacher
Required involvement and participation in: Development of the IEP Review and revision of the IEP 9/5/03

40 LEA Representative Local Education Agency representative
Administrator or person delegated with authority to commit the resources of the district

41 Special Education Providers
Identified when the referral was made Review and/or conduct evaluation with specific expertise Be prepared to address eligibility and need for special education at the meeting based on criteria and the law

42 Model Eligibility Discussion

43 Second Step: Developing the IEP
9/5/03

44 IEP Process and Product
9/5/03

45 What is the purpose of the IEP?
9/5/03

46 How do our beliefs about the IEP process influence that process?
How does our experience influence the IEP process? How is it that we can change our process to a new, more family friendly and functional process?

47 How do we facilitate the IEP meeting so everyone has opportunity to dialogue and plan together?
9/5/03

48 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004
9/5/03

49 The IEP is not a….. form 9/5/03

50 The IEP must…. ….be viewed as a PROCESS 9/5/03

51 ….is only one element of the process
The IEP document….. ….is only one element of the process The product (IEP) is developed during the process (dialogue). 9/5/03

52 See IEP Guide (page 1) - Process and Product
Prior to the meeting: Identify Roles Facilitator Recorder Post large charts See IEP Guide (page 1) - Process and Product 9/5/03

53 See Facilitating the IEP Team Process
Facilitator Put everyone at ease Identify purpose of meeting Introductions Encourage information from all participants Clarify, rephrase and summarize Keep meeting focused Record on charts See Facilitating the IEP Team Process 9/5/03

54 See Facilitating the IEP Team Process
Recorder Record information on IEP forms Clarify if necessary See Facilitating the IEP Team Process 9/5/03

55 Parents Required involvement and participation in: Evaluation IEP
Placement 9/5/03

56 General Education Teacher
Required involvement and participation in: Development of the IEP Review and revision of the IEP 9/5/03

57 The IEP is: Joint, informed decisions regarding the child’s needs, goals, and participation in general curriculum and environment 9/5/03

58 Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
What is Timothy doing now? Setting the Stage - Introductions - Role explanations e.g. facilitator and recorder See IEP Guide (pages 1-2) - Process and Product 9/5/03

59 Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
Family’s view of the situation, e.g. description of the child, strengths, expectations, concerns - Professionals acknowledge the family’s efforts - Respond to the family’s views See IEP Guide (page 8) - Present Level 9/5/03

60 Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
Professionals share information Initial Assessment Ongoing Assessment Instructional Strategies Strengths and concerns regarding the child Confirm family and professional agreement See IEP Guide (page 8) - Present Level 9/5/03

61 Sue will share information about this team meeting.
9/5/03

62 IDEA 2004 Intent is: Access to the General Curriculum (for preschool, age appropriate activities) Instructional Planning Student progress and accountability Links to general education curriculum Meaningful general education participation 9/5/03

63 See Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards
Consider state/local standards and benchmarks when developing goals and objectives Participants review “The Decision Making Process: How do I use General Education Standards to Develop the IEP?”-slide57 Consider what other children are able to do at this child’s age level. Using state and local standards and benchmarks shows that you are considering how the child will make progress toward the general curriculum. See Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards 9/5/03

64 Functional Goals Are naturally occurring Have a natural cue
Authentic circumstances Woven into natural child-driven activities Have a natural cue Opportunity to practice in a typical environment Real life activities allow practice of real life skills Have a critical effect Activity matters to the child Meaningful in the child’s daily life Important to family Has a purpose or function 9/5/03

65 High quality IEP goals:
Developed from a comprehensive assessment process Directly linked to intervention and ongoing evaluation Likely to contribute to Individualization of services Improved outcomes for young children Pretti-Frontczak, Bricker, 2000 9/5/03

66 Criteria for Functional Goals
Reflect the priorities of the family/teachers/other caregivers (RBI) Reflect real life situations Understandable Measurable NIPIP 9/5/03

67 Is the goal useful and meaningful to the family and other caregivers?
#1 Does the goal reflect the priorities of the family/caregivers/teachers? Ask yourself: Is the goal useful and meaningful to the family and other caregivers? Why should the child work on this goal? The answer should be immediately apparent Does it address Engagement Interaction (social relationships) Independence NIPIP 9/5/03

68 #2 Does the goal reflect real life situations?
Ask yourself: Can the goal be addressed by: multiple people, at multiple times of the day, during normal routines & activities? Is the context clear? NIPIP 9/5/03

69 #3 Is the goal understandable?
Ask yourself: Does it make sense? Can most anyone understand what is expected? Is it free of jargon? NIPIP 9/5/03

70 Examples of Functional Measurable Goals
While engaging in pretend play with at least one adult or child, Samuel will use both hands to play with toys for five minutes 9 out of 10 play opportunities. Can the skill be seen and/or heard? Can the skill be directly counted, e.g., frequency, duration, distance measures? Does the skill contain or lend itself to determination of performance criteria? 9/5/03

71 Examples of Functional Measurable Goals
When conversing with adults and peers, Nicole will increase the amount of time she is understandable to the average listener 75% of the time. Can the skill be seen and/or heard? Can the skill be directly counted, e.g., frequency, duration, distance measures? Does the skill contain or lend itself to determination of performance criteria? 9/5/03

72 Examples of Functional Measurable Goals
When presented with a choice of two actions, objects, or toys, Susan will make a choice from a set of two or three options 4 of 5 opportunities (may use vocalizations or an augmentative switch activated device). Can the skill be seen and/or heard? Can the skill be directly counted, e.g., frequency, duration, distance measures? Does the skill contain or lend itself to determination of performance criteria? 9/5/03

73 See IEP Guide (page 10) - Goal
Goals What should Timothy be doing? Related to meeting the child’s needs resulting from the disability Related to disability needs identified in the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance How will the goals be accomplished? Benchmarks and short term objectives (optional; not required) See IEP Guide (page 10) - Goal 9/5/03

74 See IEP Guide (page 10) - Goals
Synthesize the discussion Periodically review if goals address prior concerns of family and professionals Do the goals make sense to the family and professionals? Do the goals support interaction, engagement and independence? See IEP Guide (page 10) - Goals 9/5/03

75 Procedures for measuring progress toward meeting goals
How do we measure progress? Formal/informal evaluation Charting Anecdotal reports When will we report progress? Scheduled reports to parents Conferences and home visits Phone calls See IEP Guide (page 11) - Goals, Measurement and Reporting 9/5/03

76 Step Three: Determining Services and Placement
How will we determine which services are necessary to meet or attain the goals and objectives we have developed? 9/5/03

77 Considering a Continuum of Alternative Placements
The discussion begins with these questions: Where do typically developing children this child’s age spend their day in this community? Where does this child spend time during the day? Can the child’s goal and objectives be addressed with the use of supplementary aids and services (special education and related services) in settings with same age peers? What other settings for service delivery would address the child’s goals and objectives? Will the special education and related services be provided at no cost to the parent?

78 Least Restrictive Environment
General education curriculum Regular education environment

79 Program Summary of Instructional Services
What services will Timothy need to achieve the goals? Specially designed instruction Supplementary aids and services Related services Program modifications or supports for school personnel See IEP Guide (page 15) - Program Summary of Instructional Services 9/5/03

80 See IEP Guide (page 19) - Placement Considerations
Placement and LRE Utilize discussion of present level, goals, objectives/benchmarks Consider maximum time appropriate in general environment Consider accommodations in the general curriculum Consider specially designed instruction See IEP Guide (page 19) - Placement Considerations 9/5/03

81 Considering a Continuum of Alternative Placements
The discussion begins with these questions: Where does this child spend time during the day? Where are typically developing children this age in this community? Can the child’s goal and objectives be implemented in the current setting(s) and/or in other settings with same age peers? What other settings for service delivery would address the child’s goals and objectives? What settings have been considered and rejected? Will special education and related services be provided at no cost to the parents?

82 Purposes of the IEP… Communication Mutual agreement
Commitment of resources Management tool Monitoring document Evaluation device 9/5/03

83 After the Meeting Make any necessary edits so that the document is clear and maintains the integrity of the IEP team dialogue. Send IEP to parents Meet again if parents have concerns Review and modify IEP when needed District’s plan to fine-tune child’s IEP withstands parents’ FAPE challenge.  (2009, May 1).  Individuals With Disabilities Education Law Report, 52(2), p. II-3. Review and change shows district willingness to modify IEP and responsiveness to child’s needs. 9/5/03

84 9/5/03

85 The Link: The Link: Preschool Service Options &
Individual Education Programs (IEPs) 1.      Welcome and Introduction of team 2.      Getting to know the participants ·       What do you hope to learn today? ·       How do you feel about being here? Have participants discuss these questions with 3 other people they don’t know. From the large group ask for summary of responses. Record participant statements on large chart paper. 3.      Participants should write questions they have on sticky notes and put on parking lot. Use SIG stickys to write down any new information or ideas “ah ha’s” that will help change their parctice 9/5/03


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