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The CSG Industry – Working Together To Address our Safety Challenges Joint Industry – Contract – Regulator Forum 6 May 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "The CSG Industry – Working Together To Address our Safety Challenges Joint Industry – Contract – Regulator Forum 6 May 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 The CSG Industry – Working Together To Address our Safety Challenges Joint Industry – Contract – Regulator Forum 6 May 2011

2 CSG Industry Fatigue Risk Management Guideline Dr Kirsty McCulloch

3 Sleep, Alertness & Fatigue Accident Risk Performance Health/Social Big consequences if we don’t get it right…

4 Fatigue Risk Management Models Restricted Hours Industrially Negotiated Largely Ineffective at FRM Traditional FRM Multiple Controls “Red Flag” System Identify Risk  Manage Risk Proposed CSG FRM

5 Managing Fatigue: It’s All About Sleep! Sleep Opportunity (Work Hours) Actual Sleep Symptoms and Behaviours Errors & Near-misses INCIDENTS Dawson & McCulloch (2005), Sleep Medicine Reviews, 9 (5),

6 Sleep Opportunity: Planned Work Hours Guidelines Max work hours in a 24-h period 12 hours Min break length between shifts 10 hours Max number of shifts worked in a row 15 shifts Min number of days off per 28 days 7 Min breaks within shifts 30 minutes every 4 hrs Window of Work * * Any work should be conducted within these hours, but is not expected to last for the duration

7 Sleep Opportunity: Actual Work Hours Guidelines Max work hours in a 24-h period (once off basis) 16 hours Max work hours in a 24-h period (for 2 or more days in a row) 14 hours Min break length between shifts 8 hours Max number of shifts worked in a row 21 shifts Min number of days off per 28 days 7 Min breaks within shifts 30 minutes every 5 hrs

8 Summarising Hours of Work Guidelines  Planned work hours − Red flag  Fatigue Management Plan − Consider impact on safety critical tasks − Fatigue modelling to maximise sleep opportunity & recovery  Actual work hours − Avoid excursions from planned work hours − Where required, stay within the prescribed limits − Business/safety requirement to exceed actual work hours limits – only with individual’s consent, and with formally documented strategies in place  Work Environment/Work Tasks

9 Managing Fatigue: It’s All About Sleep! Sleep Opportunity (Work Hours) Actual Sleep Symptoms and Behaviours Errors & Near-misses INCIDENTS Dawson & McCulloch (2005), Sleep Medicine Reviews, 9 (5),

10 Actual Sleep: Personal Fitness for Work Caffeine (mg/head/day) Sleep (hrs)

11 Actual Sleep: Personal Fitness for Work Minimum of 6 hours sleep every 24 hours  How do we achieve this? − Training & education − Culture & FFW expectations − Encourage self-reporting for trend analysis  Challenges − Perceptions of ‘fatigue’ as a threat − Travel to work & start shift − Short changes − Sleep disorders

12 Symptoms & Behaviours: Personal Fitness for Work Physical Yawning Heavy Limbs Appearance Headache/Nausea Sore Eyes Poor Coordination Slow Reaction Speed Extreme Drowsiness Heavy Eyelids Micro-sleeps Falling Asleep Mental Poor Concentration Disorganisation Easily Distracted Poor Communication Situational Awareness Poor Info Processing Poor Memory Poor Decision Making Risk Taking Behaviour Errors Emotional Quiet and Withdrawn Lack of Motivation Increased Stress Levels Mood Change Decreased Tolerance Irritability Uncontrolled Temper Aggression

13 Symptoms & Behaviours: Personal Fitness for Work Active intervention for symptoms of moderate or high severity  How do we achieve this? − Training & education − Culture & FFW expectations − Encourage self- & peer-reporting for trend analysis  Challenges − Perceptions of ‘fatigue’ as a threat − Perceptions of ‘dobbing’ − Flexibility with mitigation strategies

14 Risk Identification  Risk Mitigation Have rostered hours been exceeded? ID Has the individual obtained at least 6hrs sleep in the last 24hrs? ID Is the individual experiencing fatigue-related symptoms or behaviours? ID What safety critical tasks is this individual performing? What could potentially go wrong if they’re tired? Mitigation Should this individual continue with planned work? What can be done to reduce the likelihood of error? Mitigation

15 Incident Investigation  Fatigue is an unrecognised contributor to many workplace incidents  The more info we can gather about the nature & consequence of fatigue, the better we can manage it  Investigations should consider: − Work history − Number of consecutive night shifts − Breaks during the shift − Nature & demands of work tasks & work environment − Travel time before and after shifts − Sleep history of the individual(s) involved − Medical issues that may contribute to fatigue (e.g. sleep disorders) − Observed fatigue-related symptoms & behaviours − Substances likely to cause drowsiness or prevent sleep

16 Questions? Dr Kirsty McCulloch Santos Ltd p: (08) m:


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