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Adolescents & Non-Traditional Drug Use Erica Riggs & Virginia Sanchez-Valdez.

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Presentation on theme: "Adolescents & Non-Traditional Drug Use Erica Riggs & Virginia Sanchez-Valdez."— Presentation transcript:

1 Adolescents & Non-Traditional Drug Use Erica Riggs & Virginia Sanchez-Valdez

2 Caffeine Caffeine Anhydrous is a power form of caffeine the recommended serving size is a sixteenth of a teaspoon. FDA confirmed that one teaspoon equates to 25 cups of coffee. Teens are using it to boost workouts, weight loss or energy. (Ungar, 2014)

3 Caffeine Also used by mixing into other energy drinks, homemade shakes, and coffee. Has no nutritional value Centers for disease control in many states are trying to band it. FDA officials urge consumers to avoid product Central Ohio Poison Center representative stated, “It’s like going to buy firecrackers and someone hands you dynamite.” news/index.ssf/2014/07/5_things_to_know_about_caffein.html

4 Effects of Caffeine Accessible on-line for $7 to $15 a pouch. It causes rapid or erratic heartbeat, kidney failure, seizures and death. More than two dozen student have been affected and one high school died from overdose Reports of abuse of this substance have been reported in TX, KY, IN,CA, OH and other states. (Ungar, 2014)

5 Video A Ohio teen, and former prom king, died due to toxic levels of caffeine found in his body. After ingesting caffeine powder, according to a coroner, Logan Stiner died from an irregular heartbeat and seizures. courier-journal.com:

6 Pump-it Powder Synthetic drug following K2 Marketed as an “enhanced plant vitamin” Methylhexanamine: (legal & found in geranium plant) Acts like an amphetamine (Emerging Drug Trends, 2014)

7 Pump-it Powder Effects: Seizures Hallucinations Paranoia Acceleration of heart Popular in Midwest & Plains States Sold in gas stations & novelty stores (Emerging Drug Trends, 2014)

8 Pump-it Powder $30/tin container Snorted “bumped”, injected, smoked, put into food Onset of high delayed High lasts 4-6 hours (Medtox Journal, 2012)

9 Sippin on some… kids-get-high-2D kids-get-high-2D Drink is made combining soda usually sprite, Jolly Ranchers, and prescription cough syrup with promethazine, hydrocodone or codeine Dr. Glatter of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, states, “ It can lend to seizures and essentially you can stop breathing.” Glamourized by some artists like Lil Wayne, Justin Bieber, Pimp C and DJ Screw deaths are attributed the use and abuse. (Davis, J., & Rossen, J. 2014)

10 Sizzurp, Purple Drank & Lean… Also called Barre, Purple Jelly, Texas Tea, and Tsikuni Rapper Lil Wayne was hospitalized for overdosing on codeine in March he has now spoken out against the drug. You tube if you search there are 102,000 results that include how to make the drink to glamourizing videos of people consuming it. (Davis, J., & Rossen, J. 2014)

11 Purple Drank Can be obtained by doctor shopping (going to different physicians for prescription), forged prescriptions and pharmacy theft. Cough Syrup is usually $12 per pint is sold for $300 per pint or $40-$80 an ounce. Drink produces euphoria can cause minor impairments that cause uses to move slow or lean over. Originated in TX in southern Hip Hop community Overdosing can be fatal Depresses central nervous system and can stop heart and lungs. (Adkins, 2014)

12 Youth Drug Use 2009 National Youth Risk Survey reported 20% of high school students used prescription drugs at some point. Youth from reported 3.1 use of non-medical psychotherapeutics use in one month. Rise of opiates is attributed in increased prescribing and availability. Illicit prescription drug use was more prevalent among rural teens. (Brandeis University, 2013)

13 Rural Communities

14 Misused Prescription Drugs National Survey of Youth (12-17yrs.) (Hanson, et.al.,2007)

15 Inhalants – It Starts Early Over 2.6 million children, aged 12 – 17, use an Inhalant each year to get high 1 in 4 students in America has abused a common household product by the time they reach the 8th grade 59% of children are aware of friends huffing at age 12 Inhalants are the 4th most-abused substance after alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Deaths by Inhalant Abuse each year is unknown because these deaths often are attributed to other causes (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

16 Commonly Abused Products Gases Nitrous oxide, butane lighters, helium, refrigerants, propane, whipped cream aerosols (whippets) Volatile Solvents Industrial or household solvents: paint thinner, removers, degreasers, dry-cleaning fluids, gasoline, lighter fluid Art or office supply: correction fluids, felt- tip marker fluid, glue (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2012)

17 Commonly Abused Products Aerosols Spray paint, hair spray, air freshener, deodorant, fabric protector, computer keyboard cleaners, oil sprays/PAM Nitrites – primarily used as sexual enhancers Cyclohexyl, butyl, amyl nitrites = “poppers” Marketed for illicit use in small brown bottles labeled “video head cleaner”, “room odorizer”, “leather cleaner”, or “liquid aroma” (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2012)

18 How Inhalants are Used Sniffing from a container, bag (“bagging”), cans, clothing Inhaling from a chemical-soaked rag, open container or balloon (“huffing”) Putting a bag over one’s head and huffing (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

19 Risks Nervous system and brain damage Irreversible damage to liver and kidneys, bone marrow Hearing loss Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome Individuals can die the first time or any time Usually associated with cardiac arrest (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004) (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2012)

20 What to Look For “Highs” are temporary First clues Change in behaviors at home and school Drop in grades, loss of interest in favorite activities Change in group of friends or activities Medical signs are often non-specific Healthcare professionals often baffled by symptoms No quick diagnostic tests available (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

21 What to Look For Investigate if you see: Drunk, dazed or dizzy appearance Glassy, dazed or watery eyes and nose Slurred or disoriented speech Physical lack of coordination Nausea and/or loss of appetite Spots and/or sores around the mouth Chemical odor on clothing or breath Often has sniffles, similar to a cold Unkempt appearance (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004) (Drugs and Society, 2015) HELPful way to remember: Hidden chemical-soaked rags or clothes Eyes and nose red or runny Loss of appetite or nausea Paint or chemical stains on face or fingers HELPful way to remember: Hidden chemical-soaked rags or clothes Eyes and nose red or runny Loss of appetite or nausea Paint or chemical stains on face or fingers

22 Be on the Lookout For Having multiple household products without a reason Hidden baggies, rags, or empty aerosols in unusual places Whipped topping or other aerosols are always low on propellant Child overuses perfumes, body sprays, breath mints to mask odor of solvent-based inhalants (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

23 Be on the Lookout For Paint or other products on face, lips, nose or fingers Fingernails painted with permanent markers or correction fluid Constant smelling of clothing, markers, rags Butane lighters (empty or partially filled ) or refill cans especially if student doesn’t smoke Multiple cans or overuse of computer keyboard cleaners (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

24 Treatment Traditional drug treatment facilities do not like to admit inhalant abusers Failure rate is very high Treatment takes months, possibly years Addiction to inhalants is as strong as that to cocaine Treatment is complicated Requires more time and resources Most treatment facilities not equipped to handle complexity of abusers’ needs Resource: (Alliance for Consumer Education, 2004)

25 References Adkins, J. (2014). Emerging drug trends. Regional Organized Crime Information Center. Retrieved from: rocic.riss.net/publications/emerging-drugtrends. Alliance for Consumer Education (2004). Inhalant abuse prevention. Associated Press, (2014). 5 things to know about caffeine powder after high school students death.,PennLive LLC. Retrieved from:http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/breaking-news/index.ssf/2014/07/5_things_to_know_about_caffein.htmlhttp://www.lehighvalleylive.com/breaking-news/index.ssf/2014/07/5_things_to_know_about_caffein.html Brandeis University. (2013). The Prescription Drug Epidemic. PDMP Center of Excellence. Retrieved from: Davis, J., & Rossen, J. (2014). What’s ‘sizzurp’? A dangerous way for kids to get high. TodayNews. Retrieved from:http://www.today.com/news/whats-sizzurp-dangerous-way-kids-get-high-2D http://www.today.com/news/whats-sizzurp-dangerous-way-kids-get-high-2D Gilberts, A. (2012). "Pump-it powder" emerges as latest synthetic drug of concern. Medtox Journal on Drug Abuse Recognition. Hanson, G. R., Venturelli, P. J., and Fleckenstein, A. E., (2007). Drugs and Society (11 th ed.). Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. National Institute of Drug Abuse (2012). Inhalants Retrieved from on October 13, Ungar, Laura (2014). Concerns Raised about dangers of powdered caffenine. USAToday: retrieved fromhttp://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/16/poison-control-warning-caffeine-powder-teens/ /http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/16/poison-control-warning-caffeine-powder-teens/ /


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